9 Martha Stewart Recipes We Can’t Stop Making—From One-Pan Pasta to Slab Pie

According to my mother, Martha Stewart is the queen of, well, everything. From her chic crafting supplies and flower-arranging tips to her party decor ideas and her cooking show with Snoop Dogg (yes, that Snoop Dogg), there doesn’t seem to be anything …

According to my mother, Martha Stewart is the queen of, well, everything. From her chic crafting supplies and flower-arranging tips to her party decor ideas and her cooking show with Snoop Dogg (yes, that Snoop Dogg), there doesn't seem to be anything she can't do. And at 80, the lifestyle guru continues to evolve. She has launched a line of CBD products for both humans and dogs; written close to 100 books; starred in a mini-series on HGTV called Martha Knows Best featuring a very handsome lineup of guests like Richard Gere, Antoni Porowski, and Zac Posen; and she even will soon be in the freezer section of your grocery store (in the form of high-quality prepared dinners).

But of all the things Martha has mastered, her recipes are her greatest contribution—at least to my life. Timeless and foolproof, Martha Stewart’s recipes have been a staple in my kitchen ever since I moved into my first apartment (we inaugurated those digs with her classic macaroni and cheese). And while I've never had a Martha recipe steer me in the wrong direction, there are a handful of favorites I turn to time and time again, most of which happen to live right here on Food52. One of her most popular recipes of all time is One-Pan Pasta, which calls for cooking spaghetti, cherry tomatoes, garlic, basil, and onions all in one large pasta pot in less than 10 minutes. It looks just as good cooking in the pan as it does when it’s twirled into a perfect mound on the plate, and it’s perfect for days when sweating over the stove for a long time is not an option. Martha also makes use of beloved appliances like the Instant Pot and slow-cooker for recipes like Vietnamese-Style Chicken Soup and Italian-Braised Pork

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Food52’s Ultimate Guide to the Long Weekend

There’s no better feeling than realizing on a Sunday evening that, “Hey, wait—I have off tomorrow!” The glory of the long weekend. This year, summer weekends feel especially sweet with many Americans slowly resuming pre-pandemic activities and reunitin…

There's no better feeling than realizing on a Sunday evening that, "Hey, wait—I have off tomorrow!" The glory of the long weekend. This year, summer weekends feel especially sweet with many Americans slowly resuming pre-pandemic activities and reuniting with loved ones after spending so much time apart.

To ensure you're making the most of every long weekend made available to you, we've come up with a guide to help you prepare for them all. Whether you're kicking back à la staycation, playing host to friends or family, or getting away yourself, we've got a menu idea, cleaning hack, or trusted product to make it easier for everyone.

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20 Best Baking Recipes We Can’t Wait to Make This Weekend

Happy weekend. If Monday through Friday is all about quick and easy (and did I mention quick?) dinners, Saturday and Sunday are about leisurely baking projects: warm bread, buttery scones, gooey blondies, extra-chocolatey cake. Treats you plan to sha…


Happy weekend. If Monday through Friday is all about quick and easy (and did I mention quick?) dinners, Saturday and Sunday are about leisurely baking projects: warm bread, buttery scones, gooey blondies, extra-chocolatey cake. Treats you plan to share with your neighbors, but end up eating most of on the couch while binge-watching You on Netflix. Here are 20 recipes on our must-bake list right now.


Muffins & Cakes

Photo by Mark Weinberg

Cornmeal-Cherry Scones

Cornbread, meet scones. Scones, meet cornbread. You two are gonna love each other. Note: This recipe calls for dried cherries, but feel free to swap in fresh ones (or even any berry).

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A Gateway Fresh Pasta for Those Who Want the Project, but Not the Fuss

When I want fresh, homemade pasta—but don’t want the fuss of an elaborate cooking project—I turn to my favorite Sardinian pasta shape: malloreddus (1). Also known as gnocchetti sardi, this shape requires neither a rolling pin nor a hand crank, and the …

When I want fresh, homemade pasta—but don’t want the fuss of an elaborate cooking project—I turn to my favorite Sardinian pasta shape: malloreddus (1). Also known as gnocchetti sardi, this shape requires neither a rolling pin nor a hand crank, and the process of making them is so simple that it can become a truly relaxing, even meditative, cooking project.

Most traditional fresh pastas are made using eggs and finely ground white flour. The malloreddus dough, on the other hand, is comprised of water and durum wheat semolina flour. If you don’t have a lot of experience making homemade pasta, then this eggless malloreddus dough is perfect practice because it’s exceedingly forgiving and utterly affordable.

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What Are You Cooking This Weekend?

Jenny is in perpetual search for easy recipes to attempt to feed her family. When they balk, she just eats more. Today, she’s back with a new column in light of what’s happening in our world right now.

We are marking time now, noticing what is missi…

Jenny is in perpetual search for easy recipes to attempt to feed her family. When they balk, she just eats more. Today, she's back with a new column in light of what's happening in our world right now.


We are marking time now, noticing what is missing from our days: train rides to work, soccer practice, ACT tests, happy hours, dinners alone at our favorite bars. But also what somehow still remains: sunrises, dog walks, passive aggressive encounters with colleagues (now via conference calls where someone always refuses to mute), and the delivery of mail.

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How to Make Puff Pastry, According to the Fearless Baker

I’ve always had a thing for dough. Bread dough, pie dough, biscuit dough…I love diving into a big bowl of ingredients and coming out of it with floury hands and something delicious to show for my efforts. This is why, despite being one of the m…

I’ve always had a thing for dough. Bread dough, pie dough, biscuit dough...I love diving into a big bowl of ingredients and coming out of it with floury hands and something delicious to show for my efforts. This is why, despite being one of the more complicated recipes on my long list of doughy loves, I adore making puff pastry. 

Puff pastry is made using a method known as lamination, where a block of butter is wrapped fully and sealed inside a dough. The dough then goes through a series of folds, where it is rolled out to a certain thickness and folded over onto itself. The first fold creates a series of layers (thin, alternating layers of dough and butter). The subsequent folds increase these layers, ultimately creating a versatile dough that can be used to make a huge variety of impressive desserts. (The dough for puff pastry can also be yeasted, which is then used to make things like croissants and Danish, and while the method is similar, this article focuses on a non-yeasted puff.) When the dough hits the heat of the oven, the moisture inside the thin layers of butter evaporate, creating steam, which creates the crisp, insanely flaky dough that is puff pastry. 

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3 Easy, Foolproof Desserts for the Weekend

Maybe you don’t bake or you are, like me, a baker who’s insecure about his prowess. You’re surrounded by friends and professional bakers who whip up the most gorgeous puddings. You, on the other hand, are clumsy in the kitchen and imprecise when you co…

Maybe you don't bake or you are, like me, a baker who’s insecure about his prowess. You’re surrounded by friends and professional bakers who whip up the most gorgeous puddings. You, on the other hand, are clumsy in the kitchen and imprecise when you cook—which, in everyday food, makes for adequate, sometimes even delicious results because it's cooked by instinct and by experience, and always to taste.

But in baking, which they say is a science, your inexactitude can mean a broken custard or a soapy banana bread.

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55 Crock-Pot Recipes to Set & Forget

A couple of years ago I wrote that I’d never throw out my Crock-Pot, a priceless, light blue checkered heirloom piece of scrap metal named Hal. Update: I still haven’t. Despite all of the love letters I’ve written to the Instant Pot this year, I’m happ…

A couple of years ago I wrote that I'd never throw out my Crock-Pot, a priceless, light blue checkered heirloom piece of scrap metal named Hal. Update: I still haven't. Despite all of the love letters I've written to the Instant Pot this year, I'm happy to report that Hal is alive and well, and sitting on my bookshelf as we speak.

Do I use him as often as my Instant Pot? Maybe not. But I do love him more. I love that he only has three options for me (Off, Low, and High), and that I can carry him under one arm. My Instant Pot may cook up a mean short rib, but it's heavy, ugly, and doesn't have a name—because no matter how many fancy appliances come into my life and sweep me off my feet, Hal the Crock-Pot will always be my bread and butter when it comes to slow-cooking.

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Moussaka, but Make It Bulgarian

While many are most familiar with Greek-style moussaka (consisting of layers of eggplant, potatoes, and minced meat topped with a white sauce), this dish has variations all throughout the Eastern Mediterranean. The origin of the word moussaka actually …

While many are most familiar with Greek-style moussaka (consisting of layers of eggplant, potatoes, and minced meat topped with a white sauce), this dish has variations all throughout the Eastern Mediterranean. The origin of the word moussaka actually comes from the Arabic musaqqa’a (مسقعة), which roughly means “to moisten,” referring to the fact that many versions of this dish consist of slices of eggplant that soak up a zesty tomato sauce.

Some food historians suggest that the origin of this dish is found in the Ottoman Empire, and a version of moussaka is served in Turkey to this day. This theory makes the most sense considering that the spread of moussaka throughout the Mediterranean coincides with the reach of the Ottoman Empire at its peak. Currently, you can find versions of this dish in the Levant (the area around Lebanon), Egypt, Romania, Greece, and the Balkans, and each former Ottoman territory has its own way of preparing it.

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Why You Should Cook a Whole Dang Squash in Your Slow Cooker

Welcome to Set It & Forget It, a series about all the ways we rely on our slow cookers, Instant Pots, and ovens during the colder months. Whether it’s a long braise on the stove or a quick burst in the pressure cooker, one thing’s for sure: Comfort…

Welcome to Set It & Forget It, a series about all the ways we rely on our slow cookers, Instant Pots, and ovens during the colder months. Whether it’s a long braise on the stove or a quick burst in the pressure cooker, one thing’s for sure: Comfort food means comfort cooking.


The humble winter squash is a beloved cold-weather staple, but when was the last time you changed up your cooking method for those butternuts and acorns? I can’t tell you how many times I’ve slid a tray of oiled and salted wedges into the oven for roasting, pureed cubes into soup, stirred a puree into a dip or batter. Were the results of those squash-y endeavors a delight to eat? Of course. Still, none excites me in a way I want to write home about, as they say.

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