Classic Gazpacho

This classic gazpacho recipe is a vibrant red-orange and full of traditional Spanish flavor! It’s quick to blend up this…

A Couple Cooks – Recipes worth repeating.

This classic gazpacho recipe is a vibrant red-orange and full of traditional Spanish flavor! It’s quick to blend up this summer soup.

Gazpacho recipe

What’s better than a creamy, cool gazpacho on a blazing hot day? Sure, some Americans aren’t into cold soups. But this Spanish soup, born in the heat of Southern Spain, is the true definition of refreshing. The cool puree of tomato and cucumber against the zing of the sherry vinegar and rich olive oil is truly one of life’s great pleasures. Finally, we’ve got a great recipe for a summer gazpacho: made like the Spanish do.

What’s gazpacho, exactly?

Gazpacho is a cold tomato-based soup from the Andalusia region of Southern Spain. It’s made of raw, pureed vegetables and is now eaten around the world. An important thing about gazpacho: it’s intended as a refreshment on a hot day, not to be a filling main course! So it’s usually served as a starter or tapas recipe. There are a few similar Spanish soups, like salmorejo (creamier and made with bread) and ajoblanco (a white garlic version).

Lucky for us, Alex and I have been able to experience first hand a good, cold gazpacho in the Spanish heat! It was our first meal in country on a trip to Spain a few years ago, in a tiny restaurant in the center of a white-washed village. Dang, was it refreshing! Since then, we’ve been perfecting our perfect gazpacho recipe to recreate that special moment.

Spain travel | Frigiliana Spain
Here’s the Spanish village where we had the transcendental gazpacho

Ingredients in a classic gazpacho recipe

The ingredients in a classic Spanish gazpacho vary, like any traditional recipe. Everyone has their perfect way to make gazpacho! Here are the ingredients we selected to make this gazpacho similar to our perfect Spanish rendition:

  • Ripe tomatoes: only the best, ripe summer tomatoes will do
  • Cucumber
  • Red bell pepper
  • Shallot: this brings a more subtle flavor than onion, which can be spicy
  • Garlic
  • Olive oil
  • Sherry vinegar: traditionally used in Spanish recipes and brings in that authentic flavor
  • Smoked paprika: the secret ingredient! See below.
  • Salt
Gazpacho recipe

What makes this gazpacho recipe great

There are good gazpacho recipes, and there are great ones. We hope you’ll find this one to be in the latter category! We’ve studied the Spanish tradition and tried to stick as close to authentic as possible. Here are a few notes on what makes this recipe great:

  • Sherry vinegar and smoked paprika bring authentic flavor. Smoked paprika (aka pimentón) is a traditional Spanish ingredient and adds just the right hint of complexity here. Sherry vinegar is another Spanish ingredient, and it’s astringent flavor lends just the right flair. It’s worth finding for this recipe.
  • It nixes the bread. Some Spanish gazpacho recipes use soaked bread for creaminess, but it can dilute the flavor. Plus, we took cues from our favorite Spanish Chef (José Andrés) who doesn’t use it in his. Try a Salmorejo recipe for a bread-thickened soup.
  • It’s pureed, but not strained. Some chefs strain their gazpacho, but we like ours pureed, right from the blender. But we think a good gazpacho should be blended, not chunky! Chunky gazpacho seems to be more of an American creation, not Spanish.

Chill until cold, about 2 hours (or up to 3 days)

Gazpacho is very simple to make: simply throw the ingredients in a blender, and blend until pureed! The hardest part is waiting for it to chill. Here are a few notes:

  • Chilling makes it cold, and helps the flavors meld. Don’t be tempted to throw it in the freezer to speed things up. The timing helps the flavors to mesh while they also cool.
  • Refrigerate up to 3 days. Personally we like it within 1 day of making. But you can also make in advance and refrigerate until serving.
Gazpacho

How to garnish gazpacho

A great gazpacho is also all about the garnish! It works in either bowls or small cups or glasses. It’s most often served with chopped veggies and a crusty piece of bread. Here’s what to use for a garnish for gazpacho:

  • Chopped tomatoes, cucumbers or shallot
  • Fresh herbs like oregano, chives or basil
  • Crusty bread like crostini or grilled bread
  • Olive oil drizzle

More Spanish recipes

Love Spanish recipes? After studying in Spain years ago, I fell head over heels with this special cuisine. Here are a few more of the Spanish recipes we love to make at home:

This gazpacho recipe is…

Vegetarian, vegan, plant-based, dairy-free, and gluten-free.

Print
Gazpacho

Gazpacho


  • Author: Sonja Overhiser
  • Prep Time: 10 minutes
  • Cook Time: 0 minutes
  • Total Time: 10 minutes
  • Yield: 4 small servings (about 4 cups)
  • Diet: Vegan

Ingredients

  • 2 pounds ripe quality tomatoes, cored and roughly chopped (about 3 large)
  • 1/2 medium cucumber, peeled and roughly chopped
  • 1/2 red bell pepper, roughly chopped
  • 1 tablespoon minced shallot
  • 1 small garlic clove, peeled
  • ¼ cup olive oil
  • 2 tablespoons sherry vinegar (or red wine vinegar)
  • ¾ teaspoon kosher salt
  • ¼ teaspoon smoked paprika (pimenton)

Instructions

  1. Place all ingredients in a blender, and blend until smooth. Taste and adjust salt as needed.
  2. Refrigerate until cold, about 2 hours, or up to 3 days before serving.
  3. Serve topped with additional chopped veggies, a drizzle of olive oil, and toasted bread. 
  • Category: Soup
  • Method: Blended
  • Cuisine: Spanish

Keywords: Gazpacho, gazpacho recipe

A Couple Cooks - Recipes worth repeating.

Pan Con Tomate

Pan con tomate (“bread with tomato”) is an easy Spanish tapas recipe! It’s quite possibly the best way to use…

A Couple Cooks – Recipes worth repeating.

Pan con tomate (“bread with tomato”) is an easy Spanish tapas recipe! It’s quite possibly the best way to use a ripe tomato…period.

Pan Con Tomate

Got a ripe summer tomato? Here’s quite possibly one of the best ways to use it…in the world. Try Pan Con Tomate, a Spanish tapas recipe with only a few ingredients but immeasurably massive flavor. Take one bite and it’s like ingesting the pure soul of a tomato: all its memories of growing plump in the summer sun. This transcendental summer tomato recipe will make you a quick convert.

What is pan con tomate?

Pan con tomate translates to “bread with tomato,” a Spanish dish that consists of toasted bread topped with tomato pulp, garlic and olive oil. It’s served throughout Spain as tapas or a snack, and it’s especially common in Catalan cuisine where it’s called Pa amb tomàquet.

I fell in love with pan con tomate when I lived in Madrid in university, then again when Alex and I visited Spain recently. Many tapas-style restaurants have popped up in the US since then that have imported the concept. It’s important to honor the heritage of this incredible dish: Spanish cuisine, which has also brought us iconic dishes like paella, sangria, gazpacho, and more.

Pan con tomate

Ingredients for pan con tomate

Pan con tomate is one summer’s best concepts: this Spanish recipe uses just 5 ingredients with no real cooking involved! It’s best for when you’ve got a big, juicy summer tomato. One bite, and you’ll be happy dancing with the explosive flavors! Here’s what you’ll need:

  • Ripe tomatoes
  • Bread
  • Olive oil
  • Garlic
  • Salt

Grill or broil the bread

The bread for pan con tomate can be grilled or toasted in the broiler. Either way, spread the bread slices with a bit of olive oil and salt before cooking it. Here are the pros and cons to each method:

  • Grilled bread: Grilled bread is very traditional and adds a charred flavor. This is best flavor-wise, but it does take time to preheat the grill.
  • Broiled bread: Broiled bread doesn’t have a charred flavor, but it’s quick and easy in the broiler! Broiling gets it nice and crispy, with dark edges.
Pan con tomate

Grate the tomatoes

How to get that beautiful tomato essence in pan con tomate? You’ll grate the tomatoes. Yes, grab a box grater and use the large holes to grate the tomato into a bowl. You’ll feel like you’re destroying it! But take one taste of the pulp, and it will make your tastebuds sing! Season it with a few pinches of kosher salt.

Rub the bread with garlic

The other key to pan con tomate is seasoning the bread with garlic. Unlike a bruschetta where you mince the garlic, with this Spanish tapas recipe you’ll rub the garlic right onto the toast.

  • Peel the garlic and slice it in half.
  • Take the cut side and rub it right onto the bread. You won’t see anything on the bread, and it will feel like you haven’t done anything. But one taste and you’ll see that it’s infused with the intoxicating aroma of fresh garlic!
Pan con tomate

Make pan con tomate right before serving

Take one bite of pan con tomate, and it’s absolute magic: the crunch of the bread, the juicy tomato pulp, and the golden rich drizzle of olive oil. In fact, you’ll want to eat it every day. But here’s the thing: the tomatoes do make the bread soggy over time. So it’s best to eat this treat right away!

If you’re serving this as a tapas appetizer at a party, try to avoid letting it sit out on a table for hours. Pass it around or have people enjoy it right as it comes out of the kitchen. If you want to make it in advance, here’s what to do:

  • Grate the tomatoes and refrigerate the pulp. Bring it to room temperature before serving.
  • Toast the bread and assemble right before serving. You’ll want to keep that bread deliciously crunchy!

More Spanish recipes

If you’ve followed us for a while, you’ll know we love studying traditional Spanish recipes. Here are a few of our favorites to make at home:

This pan con tomato recipe is…

Vegetarian, vegan, plant-based, and dairy-free.

Print

Pan Con Tomate


  • Author: Sonja Overhiser
  • Prep Time: 15 minutes
  • Cook Time: 0 minutes
  • Total Time: 15 minutes
  • Yield: 4 servings
  • Diet: Vegan

Description

Pan con tomate (“bread with tomato”) is an easy Spanish tapas recipe! It’s quite possibly the best way to use a ripe tomato…period.


Ingredients

  • 1/2 rustic baguette (8 slices)
  • 2 large ripe tomatoes (1 pound)
  • 2 large garlic cloves, peeled and cut in half
  • Olive oil
  • Kosher salt

Instructions

  1. Grill or broil the bread: Cut bread into 1/2-inch slices cut on the bias. Place the slices on a baking sheet. Drizzle olive oil onto each slice, followed by a sprinkle of kosher salt. Grill the bread or broil it on high until the bread until toasted and crispy, about 2 to 3 minutes per side. (As a quicker method, you can use a toaster.)
  2. Grate the tomato: Meanwhile, use the large holes of a box grater to grate the tomatoes into a bowl, discarding the skins (you will get about 1 cup pup). Season the grated tomatoes with ¼ teaspoon kosher salt, or more to taste.
  3. Serve: When the bread is done, rub each piece of bread with the cut side of the garlic (this will infuse a large amount of garlic flavor into the toast). Spoon the tomato pulp onto each slice. Top with a drizzle of olive oil and serve immediately. The bread becomes soggy after a few minutes, so top with the tomatoes directly before serving.
  • Category: Appetizer
  • Method: Grilled
  • Cuisine: Spanish

Keywords: Pan con tomate

A Couple Cooks - Recipes worth repeating.

Sangria

Learn how to make authentic Spanish sangria with this easy sangria recipe. It only takes a few minutes to prep, it’s easy to customize with your favorite wine and fruit, and it’s great for entertaining a crowd! Ever since we moved to Barcelona, I’ve received lots of requests for an authentic Spanish sangria recipe here […]

Learn how to make authentic Spanish sangria with this easy sangria recipe. It only takes a few minutes to prep, it’s easy to customize with your favorite wine and fruit, and it’s great for entertaining a crowd!

Sangria Recipe

Ever since we moved to Barcelona, I’ve received lots of requests for an authentic Spanish sangria recipe here on the blog. But as it turns out…locals here actually don’t really drink much sangria. (Which came as a total surprise to us too!)

If you glance around a restaurant here in Spain, it’s almost always the tourists who are the ones with pitchers of sangria on their tables. When locals here are craving a cold drink, they usually opt instead for a glass of vermut (here in Catalonia) or sidra (in Asturias) or tinto de verano (wine with lemon soda down in the south) or kalimotxo (wine with Coke in the Basque country). Granted, Spaniards do proudly take the credit for sangria, although the details of its origins are a bit murky. And my Spanish friends also made sure to note as I was writing this post that they do occasionally make a batch of sangria at home in the summertime, especially when they’re looking for a cheap and easy way to provide drinks for a crowd. But with amazing high-quality wine being so affordable and abundant here in Spain, most of the time people here would much prefer to just drink it straight instead of diluting it into sangria.

Still though, even if sangria is admittedly more of a touristy thing in Spain, I love making it this time of year! It has long been my go-to cocktail for summer entertaining, especially since it’s so easy to make (less than 10 minutes or prep), relatively affordable (and a perfect use for inexpensive wine), completely customizable with your favorite ingredients (hello, colorful fruit that’s in season), and it always tastes so light and refreshing (perfect for summer). It’s also easy to prep a few hours in advance, making it a great drink for easy summer entertaining. And in my experience, it’s always a hit with a crowd.

So if you are interested in learning how to make authentic sangria, here is the way that sangria is prepared here in Spain. There may be a few surprise ingredients in here, so read on!

Sangria Recipe | 1-Minute Video

Fresh fruit for authentic Spanish sangria

Spanish Sangria Ingredients:

If you ask bartenders here in Spain how to make sangria, they will be the first to tell you that — technically — there is no standard way to make sangria. It’s really just a wine punch made with seasonal fruit, sweetener, a good splash of brandy, and possibly something fizzy added in. But beyond that, the details are 100% up to you! I’ve included lots of tips below for how to customize your own sangria recipe. But as a starting place, here are the sangria ingredients that are used most commonly here in Spain:

  • Spanish red wine: As the world’s third largest wine producer, Spaniards would absolutely insist that you choose a decent Spanish red for your sangria. (Rioja wine is the popular choice, which typically features garnacha and/or tempranillo grapes.)  But no need to splurge on an expensive bottle. Sangria is the perfect way to gussy up any inexpensive or leftover wine that you might have on hand.
  • Brandy: This is the spirit most commonly added to Spanish sangria recipes. But if you don’t have any on hand, feel free to sub in cognac or orange liqueur instead.
  • Fresh chopped fruit: The standard three fruits you will see most often in Spain are oranges, lemons and green apples. But as I mention below, feel free to also add in other juicy fruits that you happen to have on hand.
  • Cinnamon stick: Yep, cinnamon! This was a fun surprise moving to Spain — there’s almost always a cinnamon stick floating in every pitcher of sangria here, and I love the subtle hint of warming spice that it adds.
  • Sweetener: Feel free to add as much sweetener to your sangria you would like. Sugar or brown sugar is standard here in Spain (melted into a simple syrup, with equal parts boiling water and sugar). But feel free to use maple syrup or honey for a natural alternative.
  • Bubbles: Totally up to you if you would like to make your sangria a bit fizzy! I prefer mine flat, but feel free to top your glasses off with a light soda (such as Sprite, La Casera or ginger ale) or sparkling water just before serving if you would like.

Sangria Pitcher

How To Make Sangria:

Homemade sangria couldn’t be easier to make. Simply…

  1. Chop your fruit: Dice the orange, lemon and green apple into evenly-sized pieces.
  2. Stir everything together: Combine the diced fruit, wine, brandy, the juice of one orange, and a cinnamon stick together in a large pitcher.
  3. (Optional) Add sweetener: If you prefer a sweeter sangria, feel free to add in a tablespoon or two of sweetener at a time until the sangria reaches your desired level of sweetness.
  4. Cover and refrigerate: Pop the pitcher in the fridge for at least 30 minutes or up to 4 hours before serving, in order to let those flavors meld together.
  5. Serve: Then serve the sangria over ice, topping off each glass with a splash of bubbly soda (or sparkling water) if desired.

Spanish Sangria Recipe

Sangria Recipe Variations:

As I mentioned above, the beauty of sangria is that it’s really more of a method than an exact recipe. So just gather whatever ingredients you have on hand and customize a batch to your liking. For example, feel free to…

  • Use a different wine: Red wine is traditional with Spanish sangria. But a good Spanish white or rosé wine would also work great!
  • Use a different liqueur: If brandy isn’t your thing, cognac or orange liqueur (such as Cointreau, Grand Marnier or Triple Sec) are also popular additions to sangria here in Spain.
  • Add different fruit: Sangria is the perfect use for leftover fresh or frozen fruit, so feel free to add in whatever you have on hand. Any juicy fruits (such as citrus, berries, grapes, pineapple, mango, kiwi, etc.) would be delicious.
  • Add fresh ginger: If you would like to give your sangria a bit of a kick, muddle in a few slices of fresh ginger.
  • Make it spicy: This is 100% non-traditional, as Spaniards typically don’t like to add much heat to their food or drinks, but I sometimes love to muddle in a jalapeño slice or two to give the sangria a subtle but interesting kick.

Sangria

More Authentic Spanish Recipes:

Looking for more authentic Spanish or Catalan recipes to try? Here are a few of my favorites that I’ve learned to make while we have been living in Barcelona…

Print
Sangria Recipe

Sangria

  • Prep Time: 10 minutes
  • Total Time: 10 minutes
  • Yield: 12 servings

Description

Learn how to make authentic Spanish sangria with this easy sangria recipe.  It only takes a few minutes to prep, it’s easy to customize with your favorite wine and fruit, and it’s great for entertaining a crowd!


Ingredients

  • 2 bottles Spanish red wine (Rioja wine is most popular)
  • 1/2 cup brandy
  • 2 oranges, one juiced and one diced
  • 1 green apple, diced
  • 1 lemon, diced
  • 1 cinnamon stick
  • optional sweetener: simple syrup* or maple syrup
  • optional bubbles: lemon-lime soda, ginger ale or sparkling water

Instructions

  1. Add the wine, brandy, orange juice, diced orange, diced apple, diced lemon and cinnamon stick to a large pitcher.  Stir to combine.  Taste and add in a few tablespoons of sweetener, if desired.
  2. Cover and refrigerate for at least 30 minutes or up to 4 hours.
  3. Serve the sangria over ice, topping off each glass with a splash of bubbly soda (or sparkling water) if desired.

Notes

Simple Syrup: To make simple syrup, just combine equal parts sugar (or honey) with water.  Give the mixture a stir and heat until the sugar (or honey) has dissolved.  Then use immediately, or cover and refrigerate in a sealed container until ready to use.

The BEST Sangria Recipe from Gimme Some Oven

Sangria

Learn how to make authentic Spanish sangria with this easy sangria recipe. It only takes a few minutes to prep, it’s easy to customize with your favorite wine and fruit, and it’s great for entertaining a crowd! Ever since we moved to Barcelona, I’ve received lots of requests for an authentic Spanish sangria recipe here […]

Learn how to make authentic Spanish sangria with this easy sangria recipe. It only takes a few minutes to prep, it’s easy to customize with your favorite wine and fruit, and it’s great for entertaining a crowd!

Sangria Recipe

Ever since we moved to Barcelona, I’ve received lots of requests for an authentic Spanish sangria recipe here on the blog. But as it turns out…locals here actually don’t really drink much sangria. (Which came as a total surprise to us too!)

If you glance around a restaurant here in Spain, it’s almost always the tourists who are the ones with pitchers of sangria on their tables. When locals here are craving a cold drink, they usually opt instead for a glass of vermut (here in Catalonia) or sidra (in Asturias) or tinto de verano (wine with lemon soda down in the south) or kalimotxo (wine with Coke in the Basque country). Granted, Spaniards do proudly take the credit for sangria, although the details of its origins are a bit murky. And my Spanish friends also made sure to note as I was writing this post that they do occasionally make a batch of sangria at home in the summertime, especially when they’re looking for a cheap and easy way to provide drinks for a crowd. But with amazing high-quality wine being so affordable and abundant here in Spain, most of the time people here would much prefer to just drink it straight instead of diluting it into sangria.

Still though, even if sangria is admittedly more of a touristy thing in Spain, I love making it this time of year! It has long been my go-to cocktail for summer entertaining, especially since it’s so easy to make (less than 10 minutes or prep), relatively affordable (and a perfect use for inexpensive wine), completely customizable with your favorite ingredients (hello, colorful fruit that’s in season), and it always tastes so light and refreshing (perfect for summer). It’s also easy to prep a few hours in advance, making it a great drink for easy summer entertaining. And in my experience, it’s always a hit with a crowd.

So if you are interested in learning how to make authentic sangria, here is the way that sangria is prepared here in Spain. There may be a few surprise ingredients in here, so read on!

Sangria Recipe | 1-Minute Video

Fresh fruit for authentic Spanish sangria

Spanish Sangria Ingredients:

If you ask bartenders here in Spain how to make sangria, they will be the first to tell you that — technically — there is no standard way to make sangria. It’s really just a wine punch made with seasonal fruit, sweetener, a good splash of brandy, and possibly something fizzy added in. But beyond that, the details are 100% up to you! I’ve included lots of tips below for how to customize your own sangria recipe. But as a starting place, here are the sangria ingredients that are used most commonly here in Spain:

  • Spanish red wine: As the world’s third largest wine producer, Spaniards would absolutely insist that you choose a decent Spanish red for your sangria. (Rioja wine is the popular choice, which typically features garnacha and/or tempranillo grapes.)  But no need to splurge on an expensive bottle. Sangria is the perfect way to gussy up any inexpensive or leftover wine that you might have on hand.
  • Brandy: This is the spirit most commonly added to Spanish sangria recipes. But if you don’t have any on hand, feel free to sub in cognac or orange liqueur instead.
  • Fresh chopped fruit: The standard three fruits you will see most often in Spain are oranges, lemons and green apples. But as I mention below, feel free to also add in other juicy fruits that you happen to have on hand.
  • Cinnamon stick: Yep, cinnamon! This was a fun surprise moving to Spain — there’s almost always a cinnamon stick floating in every pitcher of sangria here, and I love the subtle hint of warming spice that it adds.
  • Sweetener: Feel free to add as much sweetener to your sangria you would like. Sugar or brown sugar is standard here in Spain (melted into a simple syrup, with equal parts boiling water and sugar). But feel free to use maple syrup or honey for a natural alternative.
  • Bubbles: Totally up to you if you would like to make your sangria a bit fizzy! I prefer mine flat, but feel free to top your glasses off with a light soda (such as Sprite, La Casera or ginger ale) or sparkling water just before serving if you would like.

Sangria Pitcher

How To Make Sangria:

Homemade sangria couldn’t be easier to make. Simply…

  1. Chop your fruit: Dice the orange, lemon and green apple into evenly-sized pieces.
  2. Stir everything together: Combine the diced fruit, wine, brandy, the juice of one orange, and a cinnamon stick together in a large pitcher.
  3. (Optional) Add sweetener: If you prefer a sweeter sangria, feel free to add in a tablespoon or two of sweetener at a time until the sangria reaches your desired level of sweetness.
  4. Cover and refrigerate: Pop the pitcher in the fridge for at least 30 minutes or up to 4 hours before serving, in order to let those flavors meld together.
  5. Serve: Then serve the sangria over ice, topping off each glass with a splash of bubbly soda (or sparkling water) if desired.

Spanish Sangria Recipe

Sangria Recipe Variations:

As I mentioned above, the beauty of sangria is that it’s really more of a method than an exact recipe. So just gather whatever ingredients you have on hand and customize a batch to your liking. For example, feel free to…

  • Use a different wine: Red wine is traditional with Spanish sangria. But a good Spanish white or rosé wine would also work great!
  • Use a different liqueur: If brandy isn’t your thing, cognac or orange liqueur (such as Cointreau, Grand Marnier or Triple Sec) are also popular additions to sangria here in Spain.
  • Add different fruit: Sangria is the perfect use for leftover fresh or frozen fruit, so feel free to add in whatever you have on hand. Any juicy fruits (such as citrus, berries, grapes, pineapple, mango, kiwi, etc.) would be delicious.
  • Add fresh ginger: If you would like to give your sangria a bit of a kick, muddle in a few slices of fresh ginger.
  • Make it spicy: This is 100% non-traditional, as Spaniards typically don’t like to add much heat to their food or drinks, but I sometimes love to muddle in a jalapeño slice or two to give the sangria a subtle but interesting kick.

Sangria

More Authentic Spanish Recipes:

Looking for more authentic Spanish or Catalan recipes to try? Here are a few of my favorites that I’ve learned to make while we have been living in Barcelona…

Print
Sangria Recipe

Sangria

  • Prep Time: 10 minutes
  • Total Time: 10 minutes
  • Yield: 12 servings

Description

Learn how to make authentic Spanish sangria with this easy sangria recipe.  It only takes a few minutes to prep, it’s easy to customize with your favorite wine and fruit, and it’s great for entertaining a crowd!


Ingredients

  • 2 bottles Spanish red wine (Rioja wine is most popular)
  • 1/2 cup brandy
  • 2 oranges, one juiced and one diced
  • 1 green apple, diced
  • 1 lemon, diced
  • 1 cinnamon stick
  • optional sweetener: simple syrup* or maple syrup
  • optional bubbles: lemon-lime soda, ginger ale or sparkling water

Instructions

  1. Add the wine, brandy, orange juice, diced orange, diced apple, diced lemon and cinnamon stick to a large pitcher.  Stir to combine.  Taste and add in a few tablespoons of sweetener, if desired.
  2. Cover and refrigerate for at least 30 minutes or up to 4 hours.
  3. Serve the sangria over ice, topping off each glass with a splash of bubbly soda (or sparkling water) if desired.

Notes

Simple Syrup: To make simple syrup, just combine equal parts sugar (or honey) with water.  Give the mixture a stir and heat until the sugar (or honey) has dissolved.  Then use immediately, or cover and refrigerate in a sealed container until ready to use.

The BEST Sangria Recipe from Gimme Some Oven

Sangria

Learn how to make authentic Spanish sangria with this easy sangria recipe. It only takes a few minutes to prep, it’s easy to customize with your favorite wine and fruit, and it’s great for entertaining a crowd! Ever since we moved to Barcelona, I’ve received lots of requests for an authentic Spanish sangria recipe here […]

Learn how to make authentic Spanish sangria with this easy sangria recipe. It only takes a few minutes to prep, it’s easy to customize with your favorite wine and fruit, and it’s great for entertaining a crowd!

Sangria Recipe

Ever since we moved to Barcelona, I’ve received lots of requests for an authentic Spanish sangria recipe here on the blog. But as it turns out…locals here actually don’t really drink much sangria. (Which came as a total surprise to us too!)

If you glance around a restaurant here in Spain, it’s almost always the tourists who are the ones with pitchers of sangria on their tables. When locals here are craving a cold drink, they usually opt instead for a glass of vermut (here in Catalonia) or sidra (in Asturias) or tinto de verano (wine with lemon soda down in the south) or kalimotxo (wine with Coke in the Basque country). Granted, Spaniards do proudly take the credit for sangria, although the details of its origins are a bit murky. And my Spanish friends also made sure to note as I was writing this post that they do occasionally make a batch of sangria at home in the summertime, especially when they’re looking for a cheap and easy way to provide drinks for a crowd. But with amazing high-quality wine being so affordable and abundant here in Spain, most of the time people here would much prefer to just drink it straight instead of diluting it into sangria.

Still though, even if sangria is admittedly more of a touristy thing in Spain, I love making it this time of year! It has long been my go-to cocktail for summer entertaining, especially since it’s so easy to make (less than 10 minutes or prep), relatively affordable (and a perfect use for inexpensive wine), completely customizable with your favorite ingredients (hello, colorful fruit that’s in season), and it always tastes so light and refreshing (perfect for summer). It’s also easy to prep a few hours in advance, making it a great drink for easy summer entertaining. And in my experience, it’s always a hit with a crowd.

So if you are interested in learning how to make authentic sangria, here is the way that sangria is prepared here in Spain. There may be a few surprise ingredients in here, so read on!

Sangria Recipe | 1-Minute Video

Fresh fruit for authentic Spanish sangria

Spanish Sangria Ingredients:

If you ask bartenders here in Spain how to make sangria, they will be the first to tell you that — technically — there is no standard way to make sangria. It’s really just a wine punch made with seasonal fruit, sweetener, a good splash of brandy, and possibly something fizzy added in. But beyond that, the details are 100% up to you! I’ve included lots of tips below for how to customize your own sangria recipe. But as a starting place, here are the sangria ingredients that are used most commonly here in Spain:

  • Spanish red wine: As the world’s third largest wine producer, Spaniards would absolutely insist that you choose a decent Spanish red for your sangria. (Rioja wine is the popular choice, which typically features garnacha and/or tempranillo grapes.)  But no need to splurge on an expensive bottle. Sangria is the perfect way to gussy up any inexpensive or leftover wine that you might have on hand.
  • Brandy: This is the spirit most commonly added to Spanish sangria recipes. But if you don’t have any on hand, feel free to sub in cognac or orange liqueur instead.
  • Fresh chopped fruit: The standard three fruits you will see most often in Spain are oranges, lemons and green apples. But as I mention below, feel free to also add in other juicy fruits that you happen to have on hand.
  • Cinnamon stick: Yep, cinnamon! This was a fun surprise moving to Spain — there’s almost always a cinnamon stick floating in every pitcher of sangria here, and I love the subtle hint of warming spice that it adds.
  • Sweetener: Feel free to add as much sweetener to your sangria you would like. Sugar or brown sugar is standard here in Spain (melted into a simple syrup, with equal parts boiling water and sugar). But feel free to use maple syrup or honey for a natural alternative.
  • Bubbles: Totally up to you if you would like to make your sangria a bit fizzy! I prefer mine flat, but feel free to top your glasses off with a light soda (such as Sprite, La Casera or ginger ale) or sparkling water just before serving if you would like.

Sangria Pitcher

How To Make Sangria:

Homemade sangria couldn’t be easier to make. Simply…

  1. Chop your fruit: Dice the orange, lemon and green apple into evenly-sized pieces.
  2. Stir everything together: Combine the diced fruit, wine, brandy, the juice of one orange, and a cinnamon stick together in a large pitcher.
  3. (Optional) Add sweetener: If you prefer a sweeter sangria, feel free to add in a tablespoon or two of sweetener at a time until the sangria reaches your desired level of sweetness.
  4. Cover and refrigerate: Pop the pitcher in the fridge for at least 30 minutes or up to 4 hours before serving, in order to let those flavors meld together.
  5. Serve: Then serve the sangria over ice, topping off each glass with a splash of bubbly soda (or sparkling water) if desired.

Spanish Sangria Recipe

Sangria Recipe Variations:

As I mentioned above, the beauty of sangria is that it’s really more of a method than an exact recipe. So just gather whatever ingredients you have on hand and customize a batch to your liking. For example, feel free to…

  • Use a different wine: Red wine is traditional with Spanish sangria. But a good Spanish white or rosé wine would also work great!
  • Use a different liqueur: If brandy isn’t your thing, cognac or orange liqueur (such as Cointreau, Grand Marnier or Triple Sec) are also popular additions to sangria here in Spain.
  • Add different fruit: Sangria is the perfect use for leftover fresh or frozen fruit, so feel free to add in whatever you have on hand. Any juicy fruits (such as citrus, berries, grapes, pineapple, mango, kiwi, etc.) would be delicious.
  • Add fresh ginger: If you would like to give your sangria a bit of a kick, muddle in a few slices of fresh ginger.
  • Make it spicy: This is 100% non-traditional, as Spaniards typically don’t like to add much heat to their food or drinks, but I sometimes love to muddle in a jalapeño slice or two to give the sangria a subtle but interesting kick.

Sangria

More Authentic Spanish Recipes:

Looking for more authentic Spanish or Catalan recipes to try? Here are a few of my favorites that I’ve learned to make while we have been living in Barcelona…

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Sangria Recipe

Sangria

  • Prep Time: 10 minutes
  • Total Time: 10 minutes
  • Yield: 12 servings

Description

Learn how to make authentic Spanish sangria with this easy sangria recipe.  It only takes a few minutes to prep, it’s easy to customize with your favorite wine and fruit, and it’s great for entertaining a crowd!


Ingredients

  • 2 bottles Spanish red wine (Rioja wine is most popular)
  • 1/2 cup brandy
  • 2 oranges, one juiced and one diced
  • 1 green apple, diced
  • 1 lemon, diced
  • 1 cinnamon stick
  • optional sweetener: simple syrup* or maple syrup
  • optional bubbles: lemon-lime soda, ginger ale or sparkling water

Instructions

  1. Add the wine, brandy, orange juice, diced orange, diced apple, diced lemon and cinnamon stick to a large pitcher.  Stir to combine.  Taste and add in a few tablespoons of sweetener, if desired.
  2. Cover and refrigerate for at least 30 minutes or up to 4 hours.
  3. Serve the sangria over ice, topping off each glass with a splash of bubbly soda (or sparkling water) if desired.

Notes

Simple Syrup: To make simple syrup, just combine equal parts sugar (or honey) with water.  Give the mixture a stir and heat until the sugar (or honey) has dissolved.  Then use immediately, or cover and refrigerate in a sealed container until ready to use.

The BEST Sangria Recipe from Gimme Some Oven

Easy Vegetarian Paella

This vegetarian paella recipe is full of delicious, hearty flavor! A vegan spin on the classic Spanish recipe, it pleases…

A Couple Cooks – Recipes worth repeating.

This vegetarian paella recipe is full of delicious, hearty flavor! A vegan spin on the classic Spanish recipe, it pleases everyone.

Vegetarian paella

Here’s a recipe that’s guaranteed to get ooo’s and ahh’s whenever you serve it: this classic Vegetarian Paella! Paella is a traditional Spanish dish that has loads of variations. Often it’s made with seafood, but we’ve tasted many delicious vegetable-based versions while traveling in Spain! The saffron-scented rice is loaded with a colorful assortment of vegetables, and it’s a true delight. We love serving it for dinner guests, but if you’re organized this one is easy enough to work for a weeknight. (It’s a vegan paella, too!)

Ingredients in this vegetarian paella recipe

Vegetarian paella is also called paella de verduras: a rice dish cooked in a shallow pan and loaded with vegetables. This recipe is based on loads of research from our recent trip to Spain. Alex and I wanted this recipe to reflect vegetables you might see in a Spanish paella, not just any old veggies! Here’s what you’ll need for an epic vegetarian paella:

  • Traditional paella pan: you can also use a large skillet (see below)
  • Bomba rice: you can also use Arborio rice
  • Tomato, onion and garlic to make a quick “sofrito”
  • Saffron and pimentón aka smoked paprika (see below)
  • Artichokes
  • Peas
  • Chickpeas
  • Roasted red peppers (jarred)
  • Lemon wedges: garnishing with lemon is the perfect bright finish
Vegetarian paella recipe

Use a large skillet or paella pan

There are some people who say it’s not paella if it’s not made in a paella pan! (Purists.) But not everyone has access to this special type of pan, or wants to store it. We highly recommend one if you plan to make paella regularly. Here’s what to know about finding one:

  1. A paella pan is a large round, shallow pan with handles used for cooking paella. The shallow shape lets rice cook consistently. This recipe is for a 15-inch paella pan that serves 4 people. If you’re looking for one, here’s a link to purchase a 4-person paella pan.
  2. Don’t have one? Use your largest skillet. The larger the better! You may need to adjust the cook time slightly if you are using a skillet. Keep an eye on it!

Note that paella pans are made of carbon steel and can rust. If you buy one, make sure to dry the pan completely after cleaning it. Rub it with a bit of vegetable oil to prevent rusting.

Vegetarian paella

Best rice: bomba or arborio

The best rice for this vegetarian and vegan paella recipe? Bomba rice! Bomba rice is a white short grain rice that’s used for making paella. It can be hard to find at some grocery stores, but it’s easy to order it online: Bomba rice.

Another option is Arborio rice! This is the type of short grain rice that’s used for risotto. Arborio rice can result in a gummier texture than bomba, but it still works. Bomba is most consistent, if you can find it!

Paella spices: saffron and pimentón

There are two classic spices in a Spanish paella that bring in the authentic flavor. You may have heard of saffron, but it’s the combination with smoked paprika that makes the best hearty flavor in this vegetarian paella. (Bonus: we use it in lots of vegan recipes to bring in a meaty flavor.)

  • Saffron brings an earthy flavor and a beautiful color to the dish. It’s expensive but worth the splurge. If you can’t find it or don’t want to splurge, a good substitute is ½ teaspoon turmeric.
  • Smoked paprika (aka pimentón): This bright red spice gives the dish more color and a smoky undertone. Use leftovers for more of our top smoked paprika recipes.
Vegetarian paella recipe

How to cook vegetarian paella: a few tips!

Once you’re ready to cook this vegetarian paella, it’s mostly set it and forget it. Mostly! Here are a few tips for the cooking process:

  • Don’t stir it! That’s right: no stirring allowed! The broth and spices boil through the rice, leaving everything perfectly cooked. Traditional paella gets a nice brown crust on the bottom of the rice. The Spanish call this socarrat. (Note that it’s a little harder to get it if you’re using a skillet.)
  • Keep an eye on it. You’ll want to make sure the heat isn’t so hot that the broth cooks too fast or it will burn on the bottom and the rice will be uncooked! Slow and steady. See the recipe below for more tips!
  • If you’re using a paella pan, rotate the pan over the burners. Our paella pan can fit over multiple burners, so we rotate it during cooking so it stays even.

Side dishes for vegetarian paella

Once you’re done cooking, bring it to the table and spritz with lemon wedges. Unveil your brilliantly vegetable-filled vegan paella and everyone will ooo and ahh (we promise!). It’s great for entertaining, but we sometimes make them for weeknights too. What to serve with it to make it a meal? Here are a few ideas:

Vegan paella

More types of paella

Want to make paella over an open fire? Or use the traditional seafood? Here are our top variations on paella recipes:

This vegetarian and vegan paella recipe is…

Vegetarian, vegan, plant-based, dairy-free and gluten-free.

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Vegetarian paella

Easy Vegetarian Paella


  • Author: Sonja Overhiser
  • Prep Time: 15 minutes
  • Cook Time: 30 minutes
  • Total Time: 45 minutes
  • Yield: 4 to 6 servings
  • Diet: Vegan

Description

This vegetarian paella recipe is full of delicious, hearty flavor! A vegan spin on the classic Spanish recipe, it pleases everyone.


Ingredients

  • 1 medium yellow onion
  • 6 garlic cloves
  • 2 to 3 roma or plum tomatoes (1 ½ cups finely chopped)
  • ¼ cup olive oil
  • 15 ounce can chickpeas, drained and rinsed
  • 1 ½ teaspoons smoked paprika
  • ¼ teaspoon red pepper flakes (optional)
  • 1 large pinch saffron
  • 1 ¾ teaspoons kosher salt, divided
  • 3 cups vegetable stock
  • 1 ½ cups short grain Bomba rice or arborio rice
  • ½ cup frozen peas, rinsed under warm water
  • 12 ounces artichoke hearts, quartered (marinated if desired)
  • 1 to 2 jarred roasted red peppers, sliced into strips
  • Lemon wedges from ½ lemon
  • Chopped parsley, for garnish

Instructions

  1. Prep the vegetables: Mince the onion. Mince the garlic. Finely chop the tomatoes, removing the cores but keeping the seeds with their juices. Slice the roasted red peppers into strips, and set aside.
  2. Measure out the ingredients: Measure out all the remaining ingredients before you start. The cooking process goes fast!
  3. Cook the paella: In your largest skillet or a 4-serving paella pan, heat olive oil on medium heat. Saute the onion and garlic until just translucent, about 3 minutes, stirring frequently. Add the chopped tomatoes, the smoked paprika and red pepper flakes and ¼ teaspoon of the salt, and cook until the tomatoes have broken down and most of the liquid is evaporated, about 5 minutes. Stir in the stock, chickpeas, saffron and the remaining 1 ½ teaspoon kosher salt. Stir, then immediately sprinkle the rice evenly across the broth and tap the pan with a spoon to evenly spread the rice. Bring to a medium simmer and cook without stirring until liquid is absorbed, about 18 to 22 minutes (adjust the cook time as necessary if using a skillet). If your pan is large enough to span multiple burners on your stovetop, adjust the heat on each burner so you achieve a steady medium simmer. Rotate the pan every few minutes for an even cook.
  4. Add the artichokes and peas (10 minutes into cook time): When the top of the rice is beginning to show through the liquid, about 10 minutes into the cook time, press the artichokes, peas, and red pepper strips lightly into the rice.
  5. Assess whether the paella is done: In last few minutes, carefully watch the paella and rotate pan more frequently. As the paella finishes, you’ll see the steam start to slow down as the water cooks out. If desired, peek at the bottom of a pan by using a knife to scrape back the rice — you shouldn’t see any standing water. The sound will start to change from a simmer to a crackle. This indicates the crust is forming. Let the crackling continue for about 2 minutes before removing from the heat. If you smell any burning, remove immediately.
  6. Serve: When the paella is done, squeeze the lemon wedges onto the top of the pan. Sprinkle with a pinch or two of kosher salt and add the parsley, if using. Serve with additional lemon wedges.
  • Category: Main Dish
  • Method: Stovetop
  • Cuisine: Spanish

Keywords: Vegetarian paella, vegetarian paella recipe, vegan paella

A Couple Cooks - Recipes worth repeating.

YouTube’s Favorite Abuela Shines a Light on Mallorcan Cuisine

In Mallorca, 83-year-old Maria Gibert is a local celebrity. Her YouTube channel, Recetas Mallorquinas, a lo-fi cooking show where Gibert shares traditional Mallorcan recipes from her sunny kitchen in Palma, has nearly 40,000 subscribers. She’s appeared…

In Mallorca, 83-year-old Maria Gibert is a local celebrity. Her YouTube channel, Recetas Mallorquinas, a lo-fi cooking show where Gibert shares traditional Mallorcan recipes from her sunny kitchen in Palma, has nearly 40,000 subscribers. She’s appeared on Spanish national television, and regularly graces the pages of the local daily, Diario de Mallorca, both as a recipe contributor and the focus of feature articles. Though Gibert's grandchildren manage her social media, she’s aware of her influencer status. “People stop me in the streets and ask to take a photo with me,” says Gibert. The self-proclaimed #AbuelaYouTuber is the island’s home-cooking grandma—and the unofficial guardian of its cuisine, which is arguably underrated.

Spain is known for its regional gems, but the Balearic Islands have yet to fully claim a place on the culinary map. As my Mallorcan mother-in-law, Teresa, tells me, “People who travel to Mallorca think we eat dishes from other Spanish provinces—like Valencian paella or Asturian fabada. Even Spanish people think we eat just tree fruits and tomatoes,” she says with a laugh. “They have no idea that we have our own gastronomy.”

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Watermelon Gazpacho

This watermelon gazpacho recipe is the perfect balance of savory and sweet, it’s full of feel-good fresh ingredients, and always tastes so light and refreshing. Summertime = gazpacho time. ♡ And after sharing my favorite recipe for authentic (tomato) gazpacho with you years ago when we first moved to Spain, I thought that this summer we […]

This watermelon gazpacho recipe is the perfect balance of savory and sweet, it’s full of feel-good fresh ingredients, and always tastes so light and refreshing.

Watermelon Gazpacho

Summertime = gazpacho time. 

And after sharing my favorite recipe for authentic (tomato) gazpacho with you years ago when we first moved to Spain, I thought that this summer we could turn to its irresistibly sweet and savory cousin — watermelon gazpacho.

This refreshing chilled soup is the perfect way to use up a leftover hunk of watermelon that you might have hanging out in the fridge after last weekend’s picnic. When blended together with lots and lots of summer veggies, a handful of fresh mint, a slice of bread and some simple seasonings, this gazpacho tastes like summertime sunshine in a bowl. And it is delicious!

Bonus? This watermelon gazpacho recipe only takes about 15 minutes to prep and can be made up to two days in advance. Plus it’s made with fresh and healthy ingredients that are also naturally vegan and gluten-free (if you use gf bread), which makes gazpacho an especially great option if you happen to be cooking for a crowd this summer. We often turn to gazpacho when we’re entertaining this time of year since it’s so easy to prep ahead of time — usually just serving it up with a light salad and a loaf of crusty bread — and it hits the spot every time!

So grab some fresh watermelon and summer veggies, and let’s blend up a quick batch together!

(more…)

Watermelon Gazpacho

This watermelon gazpacho recipe is the perfect balance of savory and sweet, it’s full of feel-good fresh ingredients, and always tastes so light and refreshing. Summertime = gazpacho time. ♡ And after sharing my favorite recipe for authentic (tomato) gazpacho with you years ago when we first moved to Spain, I thought that this summer we […]

This watermelon gazpacho recipe is the perfect balance of savory and sweet, it’s full of feel-good fresh ingredients, and always tastes so light and refreshing.

Watermelon Gazpacho

Summertime = gazpacho time. 

And after sharing my favorite recipe for authentic (tomato) gazpacho with you years ago when we first moved to Spain, I thought that this summer we could turn to its irresistibly sweet and savory cousin — watermelon gazpacho.

This refreshing chilled soup is the perfect way to use up a leftover hunk of watermelon that you might have hanging out in the fridge after last weekend’s picnic. When blended together with lots and lots of summer veggies, a handful of fresh mint, a slice of bread and some simple seasonings, this gazpacho tastes like summertime sunshine in a bowl. And it is delicious!

Bonus?  This watermelon gazpacho recipe only takes about 15 minutes to prep and can be made up to two days in advance.  Plus it’s made with fresh and healthy ingredients that are also naturally vegan and gluten-free (if you use gf bread), which makes gazpacho an especially great option if you happen to be cooking for a crowd this summer.  We often turn to gazpacho when we’re entertaining this time of year since it’s so easy to prep ahead of time — usually just serving it up with a light salad and a loaf of crusty bread — and it hits the spot every time!

So grab some fresh watermelon and summer veggies, and let’s blend up a quick batch together!

(more…)

The 4 Basque-Pyrenees Pantry Essentials in My Kitchen

Welcome to Asha Loupy’s Pantry! In each installment of this series, a recipe developer will share with us the pantry items essential to their cooking. This month, we’re exploring four Basque-Pyrenees staples in Asha’s kitchen.

As a longtime home cook,…

Welcome to Asha Loupy’s Pantry! In each installment of this series, a recipe developer will share with us the pantry items essential to their cooking. This month, we're exploring four Basque-Pyrenees staples in Asha’s kitchen.

As a longtime home cook, former grocery buyer for a specialty food shop, and now recipe developer, my pantry remains much more well-traveled than I am—from Malaysian sambal and shrimp paste to Pragati turmeric from Andhra Pradesh, to Spanish extra-virgin olive oil and Basque peppers. The euphoria I was filled with at the first thought of sharing my pantry was quickly replaced by stomach-dropping dread—what region or country was I actually qualified to write about?

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