BAKED EGGPLANT WITH TAHINI

The eggplant is baked in the oven until tender and creamy. You can serve it plain, with olive oil and balsamic vinegar, pesto or salsa verde. Also with hummus or Greek yogurt.

The eggplant is baked in the oven until tender and creamy. You can serve it plain, with olive oil and balsamic vinegar, pesto or salsa verde. Also with hummus or Greek yogurt. A perfect standalone dish or side dish for steak or lamb. Don’t skip the salting step. It brings extra moisture out of the eggplants. The flesh is creamy, not watery, and not at all like a sponge.

The eggplant is baked in the oven until tender and creamy. You can serve it plain, with olive oil and balsamic vinegar, pesto or salsa verde. Also with hummus or Greek yogurt.

If you love baked eggplant and tahini like I do, try this Baba Ganoush Salad recipe.

Baked Eggplant with Tahini

Recipe

PREP TIME COOK TIME MAKES
30 minutes 50-55 minutes 2 servings

INGREDIENTS (serves 2)

  • 2 eggplants
  • 90 g (6 tbsp) tahini
  • 1 clove garlic
  • 2 pinches of ground coriander
  • 1½ tbsp lemon juice
  • 2 tbsp olive oil

To serve:

  • ½ chili pepper
  • 1 cup cilantro
  • 2 pinches of ground paprika
  • ½ sweet red onion

INSTRUCTIONS

  1. Cut the eggplants lengthwise into halves. With a sharp thin knife, make cuts in the flesh. Don’t cut through the skin.
  2. Slightly open the cuts and add salt. Leave it for 20-30 minutes. This will draw out the excess moisture and the eggplant won’t be mushy. This will draw out the excess moisture and the eggplant will be creamy and won’t be like a sponge.
  3. Preheat the oven to 220°C / 485°F
  4. Turn each eggplant half upside down and squeeze lightly over the sink. Blot with paper towels. Drizzle olive oil on the cut side.
  5. Line a baking tray with parchment paper. Place the eggplant halves cut side down and bake for 30-40 minutes until soft. 
Baked eggplant with tahini
  1. In the meantime, prepare the tahini. Mix together the tahini, pressed garlic, 1 tbsp lemon juice, and a pinch of salt. Gradually add cold water. I added 60 ml of water (4 tbsp). It all depends on the concentration of the tahini. Stir until it is the consistency of sour cream.
  2. Take the eggplants out of the oven. Cool slightly for 10-15 minutes. Drizzle with lemon juice (use ⅙ part of a lemon or ½ tbsp lemon juice) and olive oil (1 tbsp).
  3. Pour 2-3 tbsp of the tahini onto a plate. Place the two eggplant halves, sprinkle with paprika. Lay out the onions, chili rings, and cilantro leaves.

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What to Cook This Week?

BAKED DUCK LEGS WITH POTATOES, ONIONS, AND PEARS

There’s a magical combination of spices here. You get a full, complex flavor and aroma in an oriental style. Anise, rosemary, cinnamon, and onion combine and dance for your receptors.

I already have a great recipe for Christmas-flavored duck legs. It’s popular and everyone likes it. That’s Duck legs baked with tangerines, apples, and Chinese five-spice powder.  Check out both of these duck leg and thigh recipes.

This recipe for duck legs is very quick and easy. You just need to put them in a baking dish, just don’t forget to flip them. If you don’t have pears, you can replace them with apples or don’t use any fruit at all. 

There’s a magical combination of spices here. You get a full, complex flavor and aroma in an oriental style. Anise, rosemary, cinnamon, and onion combine and dance for your receptors.

Ок, How to cook a duck leg?

Baked duck leg with potato, onions, and pears

Recipe

duck legs with potatoes, onions, and pears
Baked duck legs with potato, onions, and pears
PREP TIME COOK TIME MAKES
3 minutes 90 minutes 2 servings

INGREDIENTS (serves 2)

  • 2 duck legs
  • 4 potatoes
  • 1 red onion
  • 2 medium pears
  • 2 tsp honey
  • 1 tbsp soy sauce
  • 1 sprig of rosemary
  • 2 stars of Chinese anise (badian)
  • 1 pinch of cinnamon
  • 1-2 pinches chili pepper (flakes or regular)
  • ½ tsp ground black pepper
  • 1 tbsp vegetable oil
  • ⅔ tsp salt

INSTRUCTIONS

  1. Preheat the oven to 180°C / 350°F.
  2. Mix together the oil, soy sauce, honey, salt, pepper, chili, cinnamon, and rosemary leaves.
  3. Place the duck legs in a large, deep baking dish. Brush them liberally with the marinade on both sides. Place the Chinese anise stars.
  1. Bake for 1 hour. Turn the duck every 20 minutes. 
  2. When the marinade begins to scorch (in about 20-30 minutes), add 2 tbsp water to the baking dish.
  3. Peel the potatoes. Cut into halves. Cover with cold water, bring to a boil, and cook until half-cooked, 10 minutes. Drain the water and lightly salt.
  4. Peel the onion and cut it into four pieces.

After an hour, go back to the duck. Check its readiness with a wooden skewer or toothpick. The duck should pierce and fall off the toothpick easily. If the duck is still tough, continue to cook it at the same temperature, turning it over and don’t add the vegetables yet.

  1. After one hour, increase the temperature to 210°C / 410°F. Add the potatoes and onions to the duck in the baking dish. Spread the gravy over the vegetables and bake for 15-20 minutes. Don’t forget to flip the duck!
  1. Cut the pear into 4 pieces (into 6 pieces if the pear is large). Cut out the core with a knife.
  1. Add the pear to the baking dish. Put the duck skin side up. Coat all the vegetables and duck with the gravy with a cooking brush. Bake until the pears are cooked through, about 10 minutes.

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Drinking French is Out!

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I’m excited to announce that Drinking French: The iconic cocktails, apéritifs, and café traditions in France, with 160 recipes is out!

My latest book features recipes for the iconic beverages of France, from café specialties hot chocolate, tisanes and infusions, and chilled chocolate frappés, to classic French apéritifs, recipes to make liqueurs, crèmes, wines, punches and cordials at home, as well as French-themed cocktails from my favorite bars in Paris. To make sure you and your guests are properly fed, there’s a whole chapter of Snacks for apéro hour, such as a Terrine facile (an easy-to-make, meaty terrine), savory Cornmeal-Bacon Madeleines, bite-size Mushroom-Roquefort Tartlets, a recipe for Duck Rillettes as well as another for Chicken Rillettes (spread), one being quite rich, and the other for those who want to eat a little lighter. Or those who can’t get duck. (Writing the book, I thought of everything…and everyone.) And there’s a Kale Crespèu, a specialty of Provence which is perfect for summer with glasses of chilled rosé.

Drinking French starts out as a typical French morning does; at a café with a small shot of coffee or a more leisurely wake-up at home with a steaming bowl of Café au lait. Later in the day, people enjoy other café favorites, such as Citron pressé, Lemonade, Fresh Mint Tea, and if it’s the summer, to beat the heat, nothing beats a chilled Chocolate Frappé. For those needing a little more of a boost, there’s a Coffee Frappé, as well as one that uses one of the most popular liqueurs in France (which, interestingly, isn’t French), in case you want something cool and spirited. But there are dozens of recipes that don’t have any alcohol, making Drinking French enjoyable to all.

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