How to Take a Cheese Plate on the Go

Whether you’re camping, road-tripping, picnicking, or spending time at the beach, a cheese plate by your side is always a welcome snack. I might be biased, but I love enjoying a plethora of great cheese and cured meat in any scenery, all year round. Ho…

Whether you’re camping, road-tripping, picnicking, or spending time at the beach, a cheese plate by your side is always a welcome snack. I might be biased, but I love enjoying a plethora of great cheese and cured meat in any scenery, all year round. However, my typical, carefully designed plates aren’t exactly simple to transport, especially when planning to enjoy them on the go. To keep your beautiful, cheesy creations intact outside the confines of your home, here are six tips.

1. Pick a Secure Base

When you’re out and about, forget about fancy platters or boards. I like to build my cheese plate directly in a wide reusable container or to-go box (you can even find boxes made specifically for this use). This way, everything is packed in and ready to eat once you arrive at your destination. It takes some extra work to bring all of the items separately to build on the spot, so arranging the plate beforehand saves a lot of time and eliminates the need for excess supplies, like a cutting board, sharp knife, and extra food packaging.

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How to Brine Meat—& Why You Should Bother

Have you ever suffered the travesty that is a dry, tasteless chicken breast? Or tried to cut into a pork chop, only to be rewarded with a bicep workout and a rumbling stomach? Or chewed your way through a turkey that tastes like it might’ve been made o…

Have you ever suffered the travesty that is a dry, tasteless chicken breast? Or tried to cut into a pork chop, only to be rewarded with a bicep workout and a rumbling stomach? Or chewed your way through a turkey that tastes like it might've been made out of sand? We have, too. It was unpleasant. Thankfully, it never has to happen again—just harness the power of science, and you can brine your way to consistently better meat. Brining meat should happen at least 12 hours in advance of when you want to cook the meat and can be done with water, salt, and sugar or a dry brine using a variety of herbs and spices. Here's why it works, and how to use our brine recipes for everything from a Thanksgiving turkey to everyday cuts of meat.

Why Do You Brine Before Cooking?

Brining was originally used for food preservation in the pre-refrigeration era. However, there are two solid reasons why you should brine your meat in the 21st-century: flavor and texture. Brining infuses the meat with savory, finger-lickin' flavors, all while tenderizing it to butter-soft texture. So how does it work?

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So, You’re Pregnant—Here’s What’s Safe to Eat & Drink

You’re pregnant, congrats! What a wild, joyful, cosmic, overwhelming, incredible, uncertain, life-altering experience pregnancy and motherhood can be. When you’re pregnant, there’s enough to think about without wondering about what’s safe to eat, yet…


You’re pregnant, congrats! What a wild, joyful, cosmic, overwhelming, incredible, uncertain, life-altering experience pregnancy and motherhood can be. When you're pregnant, there's enough to think about without wondering about what's safe to eat, yet here we are.

Fact is, whether you’re pregnant or not, essentially all food can pose some kind of risk, from E. coli–tainted leafy greens to accidentally undercooked meat. With this in mind, it’s best to take a balanced approach to risk and benefit when choosing ingredients for pregnancy-safe recipes—maximizing taste, nutrition, and variety.

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Turducken Has Been Weird for a Very Long Time

A turducken is weird. Like very weird. It may seem like it’s part of a recent trend in creating super over-the-top food creations all for the sake of posting a jaw-dropping photo on Instagram, but this opulent creation dates back centuries. Three…

A turducken is weird. Like very weird. It may seem like it’s part of a recent trend in creating super over-the-top food creations all for the sake of posting a jaw-dropping photo on Instagram, but this opulent creation dates back centuries. Three incredible meats stuffed on top of one another and rolled up into one package? And a bread stuffing too? It’s the ultimate Thanksgiving dinner. But as bizarre as turducken may seem on the surface, it’s one dish that’s part of a robust culinary tradition known as engastration, which is essentially food stuffed into more food. As you slice deeper and deeper into the story (and the meat itself), it only gets more delicious and odd. Ahead, you’ll find tips for how to make a turducken and dive deep into the robust history of this popular 20th-century dish.

The History of Turducken

The late Cajun chef Paul Prudhomme claimed to have invented the turducken (a turkey stuffed with a duck stuffed with a chicken) in the 1970s. He became synonymous with the dish—and even trademarked the name in 1986 (Turducken™). Yet, there are plenty of skeptics who aren’t quite sold on the origins of the turducken and Prudhomme’s ownership of the invention. 

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44 Recipes From Black Food Bloggers to Celebrate Juneteenth

This year marks the 156th commemoration of Juneteenth. The holiday has largely been celebrated in Texas and certain pockets throughout the American South, but in recent years, people across America and even around the world have taken an interest in wh…

This year marks the 156th commemoration of Juneteenth. The holiday has largely been celebrated in Texas and certain pockets throughout the American South, but in recent years, people across America and even around the world have taken an interest in what Juneteenth, shorthand for June 19th, is all about.

On that day in 1865, more than two years after the Emancipation Proclamation was signed, news reached enslaved African Americans in Texas, finally ending legalized slavery. The day represents freedom, hope, and new beginnings for the Black community, and it is celebrated with parades, educational events, and communing around special foods.

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Spiced Kefta

Persian food, like many of the foods from a region that’s often broadly referred to as the Middle East, takes cues from a variety of influences and cultures as people traverse borders and bring their delicious foods with them. Which is why the food in America is so diverse; people have gifted us with foods from their homelands, such as tacos, sushi, pizza, beer, and…

Persian food, like many of the foods from a region that’s often broadly referred to as the Middle East, takes cues from a variety of influences and cultures as people traverse borders and bring their delicious foods with them. Which is why the food in America is so diverse; people have gifted us with foods from their homelands, such as tacos, sushi, pizza, beer, and bagels. Similarly, France has been blessed to have beans for cassoulet, chocolat chaud (hot chocolate), and croissants.

As a cook, I like dipping into various cuisines and cultures and lately, I’ve been working on Tahdig, a Persian rice dish that’s cooked on the stovetop until the bottom gets crusty, which can take an hour or longer, and requires some patience. Once done, you take a leap of faith and turn it out onto a plate so the crispy part (the tahdig) forms a golden, crackly crown on top of a bed of fragrant, saffron-infused rice…if you do it right.

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How to Cook Pork Tenderloin to Perfection

Reasonably priced and bearing enough meat to feed the whole family, pork tenderloin is the obvious choice for many households when planning a meaty main dish. Still, if not prepared thoughtfully, pork tenderloin can go dry and dull—not what you want af…

Reasonably priced and bearing enough meat to feed the whole family, pork tenderloin is the obvious choice for many households when planning a meaty main dish. Still, if not prepared thoughtfully, pork tenderloin can go dry and dull—not what you want after spending all that energy in the kitchen. When it comes to pork tenderloin, there are a couple tricks to achieving a moist, tender roast.

What Is Pork Tenderloin? Is that Different from Pork Loin?

Pork tenderloin and pork loin are not the same thing. The former (also known as pork fillet or pork tender) is long and thin, cut from the muscle running along the spine; the latter (also known as a pork center rib roast or a center-cut pork loin roast) is a heftier slab of meat with a fat cap, cut from back by the ribs (you may know it better sliced, as a pork chop). Perfect for those “I need dinner in an hour” nights, pork tenderloin cooks up tender and quickly when properly prepped.

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Where to Buy Rabbit, Boar & Other Wild Game Meat

Before my family moved to Maine back in the mid ’90s, I’d only ever had chicken, beef, and pork, with the odd bit of duck and lamb on special occasions. Once we settled in and made friends with folks, I had my first taste of game meat—specifically, dee…

Before my family moved to Maine back in the mid ’90s, I’d only ever had chicken, beef, and pork, with the odd bit of duck and lamb on special occasions. Once we settled in and made friends with folks, I had my first taste of game meat—specifically, deer and moose. Hunting was, and continues to be, a big thing where I grew up. Every November, the handful of our friends that hunted would bag a deer, and we’d inevitably end up with some of it in our freezer. Because of that, I’ve always associated winter with venison stew.

It’s been a long time since I last lived in Maine, but I still get those annual cravings for venison. A few years back, I wondered if I could get my hands on venison online, along with any of the other types of game meat I’d since been lucky enough to try. As always, my old pal the internet provided a bounty of options. Here are my three favorite places to buy wild game meat.

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How Much Ham Per Person Is Just Right?

When it comes to planning the ham for Easter dinner (or any meal where a large-format pork will be the hero), a number of questions present themselves almost immediately: Where should I buy the ham? What type of ham should I buy? Bone-in or boneless? H…

When it comes to planning the ham for Easter dinner (or any meal where a large-format pork will be the hero), a number of questions present themselves almost immediately: Where should I buy the ham? What type of ham should I buy? Bone-in or boneless? How much ham per person? and so on. Odds are your holiday meal will be a bit smaller this year than it has been in years past, but these questions remain just as important when serving your household of three as they were when you were hosting 20. So, let’s break it down.

How much ham per person?

The best rule of thumb for ham is to plan about 1/2 pound per person when picking a bone-in ham (it’s heavier) and 1/3 pound if boneless. Look, at the end of the day, some people will eat more than expected, some will eat less—it’ll even out. If you’re making a lot of side dishes, err on the smaller side; if you texted your roommates "ham party at 3 p.m. on Sunday," consider buying more.

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How to Cook Lamb Chops to Crisp, Tender Perfection

Lamb chops are a scrumptious, savory treat, and a lovely way to bring variety to the typical rotation of chicken, beef, and pork. Quick-cooking and tender—depending on the cut, of course—lamb chops also possess a uniquely rich character that pairs well…

Lamb chops are a scrumptious, savory treat, and a lovely way to bring variety to the typical rotation of chicken, beef, and pork. Quick-cooking and tender—depending on the cut, of course—lamb chops also possess a uniquely rich character that pairs well with many different combinations of herbs and spices. Learn how to cook lamb chops to achieve the best possible result, and bring this impressive dish to the table more often.

Types of Lamb Chops

"Lamb chop" is a broad term that can refer to several different cuts of meat. To understand how to cook a lamb chop, it's important to know which cut you're cooking. The two most popular kinds are rib chops and loin chops, but you'll also see shoulder (or blade), sirloin, and leg chops in the butcher's case from time to time.

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