17 Favorite Kitchen Gadgets—On Sale During Amazon Prime Day

Kitchen deals are continuing to drop every hour during Amazon Prime Day, though we’re seeing things slowing down. With the event taking place from June 21 through June 22 (as in today), it can be overwhelming to sift through all the deals to find the o…

Kitchen deals are continuing to drop every hour during Amazon Prime Day, though we're seeing things slowing down. With the event taking place from June 21 through June 22 (as in today), it can be overwhelming to sift through all the deals to find the ones worth buying.

That’s why we turned to our team for their favorite can’t-live-without kitchen items like a SodaStream for endless sparkling water and a kitchen scale that comes in clutch for baking—all of which happen to be on sale during Prime Day. Our shopping strategy has always been to buy things we absolutely need instead of just what we want, and after years of using these tools, we know you’re going to need ‘em.

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28 Very Doable Ideas to Upgrade Your Rental

Rent Like You Mean It is a series all about giving our rental spaces a new lease. We’ve rounded up a whole host of refreshing spruce-ups (and cover-ups), impactful DIYs (plus how to get them back to square one when you leave), and peeks at real-life re…

Rent Like You Mean It is a series all about giving our rental spaces a new lease. We’ve rounded up a whole host of refreshing spruce-ups (and cover-ups), impactful DIYs (plus how to get them back to square one when you leave), and peeks at real-life rental transformations. Because a lease should never stop you from having a space that feels like yours—even if it’s only for a year.


Renting your apartment is usually temporary—maybe you’re in a certain area for your job, or maybe it’s a pit stop before buying a starter home. But that doesn’t mean you have to be stuck with dated kitchen tile, lack of light, and zero closet space for the rest of your lease—not if we have anything to say about that.

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10 Ways to Decorate Your Kitchen Island—Beyond a Bowl of Fruit

Kitchen islands serve a number of purposes: They’re a valuable food prep station, serve as a dining space, and provide a home for appliances that don’t fit on the countertop. But by no means does that mean that they can’t be aesthetically pleasing while also serving these other functions. We’ve rounded up 10 of our favorite ideas for kitchen island decor—no matter your style, you’re sure to find inspiration.


1. Vintage Touches

Photo by Will Taylor

The kitchen island at Will Taylor’s beach house makes for a cozy dining space but also looks elegant with the addition of classic decorative items, such as a framed picture and brass candlestick. Decor doesn’t need to be loud or overwhelming to make a stylish statement. Sometimes, as demonstrated here, less is more.

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Kitchen islands serve a number of purposes: They’re a valuable food prep station, serve as a dining space, and provide a home for appliances that don’t fit on the countertop. But by no means does that mean that they can’t be aesthetically pleasing while also serving these other functions. We’ve rounded up 10 of our favorite ideas for kitchen island decor—no matter your style, you’re sure to find inspiration.


1. Vintage Touches

Photo by Will Taylor

The kitchen island at Will Taylor’s beach house makes for a cozy dining space but also looks elegant with the addition of classic decorative items, such as a framed picture and brass candlestick. Decor doesn’t need to be loud or overwhelming to make a stylish statement. Sometimes, as demonstrated here, less is more.

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The Legendary Allure of Britain’s AGA Stove

I had always assumed the origins of the AGA stove were uniquely British, but this stalwart appliance was actually created about a century ago by blind Swedish physicist Gustaf Dalén, a Nobel Laureate. It took Dalén and his company seven years of protot…

I had always assumed the origins of the AGA stove were uniquely British, but this stalwart appliance was actually created about a century ago by blind Swedish physicist Gustaf Dalén, a Nobel Laureate. It took Dalén and his company seven years of prototyping to develop the AGA, and it was purpose-built as a solution to his wife Elma’s frustration at having to constantly stoke their cookstove and closely watch over the food she prepared.

At first glance, the AGA, while not without its throwback charm, may look like a curious relic of a bygone era to the uninitiated eye—an intimidating enameled hunk of no-thank-you, salvaged from a locomotive museum. Or something passed on from an old house’s original tenants, left in place, too heavy to extract or dismantle. Certainly it’s not something one would intentionally purchase today, and have placed in their contemporary kitchen, right? Well, guess again. The desire and considerable expense put forth to own and install this venerable tool continues seemingly unabated to this day. Never mind that it also demands users recalibrate their preconceptions of everyday food preparation techniques.

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The Best Lighting For Maximum Kitchen Visibility

Shopping for light bulbs can be as simple or complex as you make it. My roommate and I, who spend an inordinate amount of money at the nearby corner store (because it’s right there!), tend to suffer through whatever light bulbs they’ve got in stock—mor…

Shopping for light bulbs can be as simple or complex as you make it. My roommate and I, who spend an inordinate amount of money at the nearby corner store (because it's right there!), tend to suffer through whatever light bulbs they've got in stock—more often than not they're soft white 60-watt incandescents. I realize I should be embarrassed.

But in our living room, where there are four to five lamps lighting a space barely larger than a dog house, these hazy bulbs create a warm, layered blanket of light that we love in the evenings. In the kitchen, however, where we try to use them in lieu of our fluorescent ceiling fixture, they fail—in the kitchen, it turns out, you actually need to be able to see.

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Century House Reno: Amanda & Timmie Roll Up Their Sleeves

The beach house was built just before the turn of the 20th century, back when the Hamptons were mostly potato fields and pitch pines. William Dwight Whitney, a Sanskrit scholar and linguist, constructed the house with proceeds from his 10-volume Centur…

The beach house was built just before the turn of the 20th century, back when the Hamptons were mostly potato fields and pitch pines. William Dwight Whitney, a Sanskrit scholar and linguist, constructed the house with proceeds from his 10-volume Century Dictionary, published in 1889. For this reason, it became known as “Century House” generations ago—and we call it that to this day.

My husband Tad’s family, and an evolving generational tidal flow, have owned the house since 1915, but even as bankers have built gilded fortresses all around it, the Friends have staunchly resisted the temptation to sell. Instead, they’ve doubled down on keeping the house intact.

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Small-Kitchen Cooking Tips from a Camper-Living Chef

When many New York City dwellers fled to smaller towns and rural areas last year, I, like many others, was skeptical of their intentions. But the journey of one of my favorite voices in the city’s food scene, Lee Kalpakis, was one that felt inspiring (…

When many New York City dwellers fled to smaller towns and rural areas last year, I, like many others, was skeptical of their intentions. But the journey of one of my favorite voices in the city’s food scene, Lee Kalpakis, was one that felt inspiring (and soothing!) to follow during this time. When the pandemic hit, Kalpakis—who has worked as a recipe developer, food stylist, culinary producer, and video host—and her partner both lost their jobs; they decided to give up their Brooklyn loft and move to the Catskills, where they both grew up. But instead of another apartment, they purchased a bare-bones 1976 Fleetwood Prowler van to refurbish. Now, they’re on their own land—much more isolated than when they had started out in 2020—but building a home all their own.

Though Kalpakis has spent most of her professional life working in restaurants (including her parents’ growing up) and large test kitchens, she’s accustomed to cooking in small spaces by nature of living in NYC apartments. Now, she's figuring out how to evolve her cooking, not just for a weekend camping trip, but for the long haul in the woods.

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The Piece of Decor Your Kitchen Is Calling For

It’s practically undeniable at this point that kitchens are the beating heart of our homes. They’re where we gather to make delicious food, deepen our relationships, and forge new memories (not to mention hold 3 p.m. corporate brainstorms and 11 a.m. a…

It’s practically undeniable at this point that kitchens are the beating heart of our homes. They’re where we gather to make delicious food, deepen our relationships, and forge new memories (not to mention hold 3 p.m. corporate brainstorms and 11 a.m. art class). The fluidity of these spaces is of paramount importance: You have to have enough room to seat the whole family, a table that doubles as an eat/work zone, enough gizmos and gadgets to help you take on all the additional home cooking... the list goes on. But for as functional—and beautiful—as many of our kitchens are, are they truly reflective of our homes, and our style? I’d venture a guess and say maybe not.

Ask any designer and they’ll tell you the biggest impact you can make in a space is often with art. Not only does it help tie a room together, but it’s a great way for homeowners to imbue their dwellings with their unique taste and point of view. Yet, oftentimes, the kitchen is the last place we add decor layers like artwork.

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12 Handy Organization Ideas for Small Kitchens

My first apartment in San Francisco was a well-lit 1920s studio on California Street that had a kitchen with capacity for roughly three-fourths of one person at a time. The storage space was virtually nonexistent: I had a single, tiny wall of cabinets …

My first apartment in San Francisco was a well-lit 1920s studio on California Street that had a kitchen with capacity for roughly three-fourths of one person at a time. The storage space was virtually nonexistent: I had a single, tiny wall of cabinets abutting the stove (rendering one section of shelf inaccessible), and just one cabinet next to the kitchen sink.

But a decade later, comprising a stint at Williams-Sonoma HQ, a wedding, and two increasingly larger apartments, I’d officially amassed enough kitchen gear to stock a boutique.

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The Lighting Trick Your Kitchen Is Missing

I have big-time Nancy Meyers aspirations for my home. There’s just something about all the interiors featured in her films (think: Something’s Gotta Give, The Intern, Father of the Bride, et al)—they feel collected and lived-in and cozy, while still bo…

I have big-time Nancy Meyers aspirations for my home. There’s just something about all the interiors featured in her films (think: Something’s Gotta Give, The Intern, Father of the Bride, et al)—they feel collected and lived-in and cozy, while still boasting a thoughtful, design-forward aesthetic. Architectural Digest even wrote an article on the psychology behind the Nancy Meyers dream home, so clearly I’m not the only one here.

But I digress—I got on this topic for a reason, and that reason is kitchen lamps. According to my research (consisting of many purely indulgent, non-scientific viewings of The Holiday and It’s Complicated) rule #247 when it comes to achieving that Nancy Meyers vibe comes in the form of ambient lighting—and lots of it. There’s nothing like a soft, slightly-yellowed glow to make your home—and any room in it—feel totally welcoming and warm. And in no place is it more difficult to achieve that vibe than in your kitchen, where harsh top lighting or single pendants over the island reign supreme.

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