An Over-the-Top Vietnamese Menu From ‘The Red Boat Fish Sauce Cookbook’

While Rodgers and Hammerstein’s favorite feast might include crisp apple strudel and schnitzel with noodles, nothing says holiday to us quite like savory braised pork belly and honeycomb cakes. The dishes on this menu make for a great feast, one that t…

While Rodgers and Hammerstein’s favorite feast might include crisp apple strudel and schnitzel with noodles, nothing says holiday to us quite like savory braised pork belly and honeycomb cakes. The dishes on this menu make for a great feast, one that takes Red Boat founder Cuong Pham back to his mother’s holiday table of years past. They also have the distinct advantage of reducing the stress of the holiday party: Most of these recipes can be prepared ahead of time, so you won’t need to spend the entire evening in the kitchen and miss out on the merriment.

Taro Shrimp Fritters

Our savory fritters of plump shrimp tucked into a nest of taro will please even the pickiest eater. Take advantage of the taro, which stays incredibly crisp once fried, and fry your fritters up to 2 hours ahead. Keep them on a baking pan lined with a wire rack in a warm oven at the lowest setting until you’re ready to serve. They’re excellent either plated or passed around during the party. Don’t forget the nuoc cham on the side!

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The Special Secrecy of Pandan Desserts

A Big Little Recipe has the smallest-possible ingredient list and big everything else: flavor, creativity, wow factor. That means five ingredients or fewer—not including water, salt, black pepper, and certain fats (like oil and butter), since we’re gue…

A Big Little Recipe has the smallest-possible ingredient list and big everything else: flavor, creativity, wow factor. That means five ingredients or fewer—not including water, salt, black pepper, and certain fats (like oil and butter), since we're guessing you have those covered. This week: Author, food photographer, and guest columnist Uyen Luu is sharing a stunningly minimalist dessert from her new cookbook, Vietnamese.


Much of my childhood was spent in anticipation of what my mum would cook. She’s always chasing the taste of her sweet, sour home of Phan Thiet in Vietnam.

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A Viral Hack for Homemade Tteok in Minutes

I come from a long line of tteokbokki lovers on my mom’s side of the family. A few years ago, I even set up a Google Alert that updates me on the latest fusion flavor twists, snack launches, cutesy merch—and one hack I had to try.

Tteokbokki—spicy, st…

I come from a long line of tteokbokki lovers on my mom’s side of the family. A few years ago, I even set up a Google Alert that updates me on the latest fusion flavor twists, snack launches, cutesy merch—and one hack I had to try.

Tteokbokki—spicy, stir-fried rice cakes—is a​ staple dish in South Korea​, often sold from street carts​ and at snack shops​. Tteok traditionally come in two shapes: Tteokguk-tteok, thinly sliced circles, are the slurpable star of Dduk Guk (aka tteokguk), rice cake soup. Garaetteok, finger-sized cylinders, are the preferred vessel in saucier dishes like tteokbokki.

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At the Heart of This Lunar New Year, a Different Kind of Magic

The Lunar New Year falls on Jan. 25 this year. It’s a momentous occasion celebrated by millions around the world, and we reached out to some of our friends to see how they’d be ushering in the Year of the Rat. Eunice Byun and David Nguyen are the food-…

The Lunar New Year falls on Jan. 25 this year. It's a momentous occasion celebrated by millions around the world, and we reached out to some of our friends to see how they'd be ushering in the Year of the Rat. Eunice Byun and David Nguyen are the food-loving co-founders of Material, a thoughtful kitchenware brand that always keeps the home cook (like us!) in mind. See how they honor their respective Korean and Vietnamese cultures during this special time of year.


Eunice on Korean New Year, or Seollal

There is, for me, no better way of ringing in another year than with family and good food. This is the very reason why Korean New Year (or seollal) is one of my favorite holidays. From the communal meal prep to the ceremonial bowing to elders (sehbeh) to the lively game of yutnori (where sticks are thrown in the air like a game of dice—and trust me, it gets rowdy with my family), I love the sense of togetherness and tradition that comes with every Lunar New Year’s gathering.

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