Graham Cracker Cookies

Did you eat graham crackers with frosting when you were a kid? It’s seriously the best treat. And let’s be honest, I still love graham crackers and frosting, it’s such a nostalgic combo. Well, I decided to create a cookie based on one…

Did you eat graham crackers with frosting when you were a kid? It’s seriously the best treat. And let’s be honest, I still love graham crackers and frosting, it’s such a nostalgic combo. Well, I decided to create a cookie based on one of my favorite treats and I think these just might be the…

Caramel Apple & Almond Cream Entremet Tart

This dazzling fall dessert features flavor-packed layers of spiced salted caramel, tart apple, sultry vanilla and elegant almond; topped with a mascarpone whipped cream and gorgeous roses made from thinly sliced apple. With distinct layers of spiced apple caramel, vanilla almond crémeux, and mascarpone whipped cream all in a sweet and salty almond shortcrust, this […]

The post Caramel Apple & Almond Cream Entremet Tart first appeared on Love and Olive Oil.

This dazzling fall dessert features flavor-packed layers of spiced salted caramel, tart apple, sultry vanilla and elegant almond; topped with a mascarpone whipped cream and gorgeous roses made from thinly sliced apple.

With distinct layers of spiced apple caramel, vanilla almond crémeux, and mascarpone whipped cream all in a sweet and salty almond shortcrust, this stunning caramel apple mousse tart will surely be the talk of the table!

Caramel Apple Mousse Tart on a ceramic plate, with smaller tartlets and red apples in the background.

Phew. This recipe almost did me in. Turns out adding bits of apple to chewy caramel resulted in a runny, weepy mess every time, no matter how firm the caramel was to begin with. And drying out the apples enough to avoid this wasn’t nearly as pleasant in terms of texture and flavor.

In the end, the answer to this pomme puzzle was, in fact, gelatin. A little bit added to the caramel/apple mixture took care of any excess moisture and resulted in a perfectly soft and chewy caramel texture without any ooze. Success!

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Chocolate Lover’s Chocolate Chip Cookie Recipe

I know what you are probably thinking, do I really need another chocolate chip cookie recipe? I am here to tell you YES! You most certainly need this Chocolate Lover’s Chocolate Chip Cookie recipe because they are the best. I know there are so ma…

I know what you are probably thinking, do I really need another chocolate chip cookie recipe? I am here to tell you YES! You most certainly need this Chocolate Lover’s Chocolate Chip Cookie recipe because they are the best. I know there are so many “best” recipes out there, but these are our favorite and…

Turkey and Wild Rice Soup

Turkey and Wild Rice Soup is a great way to use up those Thanksgiving leftovers, plus the leftovers are great so it’s the perfect meal prep!

The post Turkey and Wild Rice Soup appeared first on Budget Bytes.

Have you eaten all of your Thanksgiving leftovers yet?? If not, here’s an amazing soup that you can make with that leftover turkey, and any leftover vegetables you may have laying around from all that Thanksgiving prep a few days ago. This Turkey and Wild Rice Soup is rich, flavorful, and just packed with goodies. Plus, it’s one of those soups that tastes even better the next day, so make a pot of this and you’ll be eating GOOD for the next few days!

Overhead view of a bowl of turkey and wild rice soup on a wood surface.

What’s in Turkey and WIld RIce Soup

This recipe is actually based on the filling for my chicken pot pie recipe, but I used leftover Thanksgiving turkey instead and made it a little thinner to be more soup-like.

It starts with a basic medley of vegetables (onion, garlic, carrot, celery, and mushrooms) sautéed until tender, then we add a combination of butter and flour that will help thicken the soup and give it body. Next, we add vegetable broth, herbs, and the wild rice blend, and simmer until the rice is tender. Finally, we add in the cooked chopped turkey, heat through, then add a dose of cream for a rich finish. 👌 Perfect!

Do I Have to Use Turkey?

This recipe is quite flexible, so if you want to make it any other time of the year other than after Thanksgiving, simply swap out the cooked turkey with some chopped rotisserie chicken! Still super delish and hearty!

Overhead view of turkey and wild rice soup in the pot with a ladle.

What Kind of Rice to Use

For this soup, you’ll want to use a wild rice blend. While you can use wild rice by itself, I find that using a blend of different rices adds more texture and color to the bowl and the rice blends tend to be more affordable than wild rice by itself. I used Lundberg’s Wild Blend, but you can sometimes find generic store versions of this, depending on where you shop (last year ALDI had some). And, since rice is shelf stable, you can save the leftovers to use in other recipes, rather than worrying about it going to waste.

How to Store Leftovers

Refrigerate this soup just after cooking so that it cools quickly. Even better yet, divide it into single servings for faster cooling and easier serving and reheating later. Chill completely in the refrigerator overnight, then, if desired, transfer it to the freezer for longer storage. The soup can be reheated in the microwave or in a pot on the stove over medium-low, stirring often, until hot.

Close up side view of a bowl of turkey and wild rice soup.
Overhead view of a bowl of turkey and wild rice soup.
Print

Turkey and Wild Rice Soup

Turkey and Wild Rice Soup is a great way to use up those Thanksgiving leftovers, plus the leftovers are great so it's the perfect meal prep!
Course Dinner, Lunch, Main Course, Soup
Cuisine American
Total Cost $8.94 recipe / $2.24 serving
Prep Time 15 minutes
Cook Time 1 hour
Total Time 1 hour 15 minutes
Servings 4 1.75 cups each
Calories 472kcal

Equipment

Ingredients

  • 1 yellow onion $0.37
  • 2 carrots $0.29
  • 3 ribs celery $0.32
  • 2 cloves garlic $0.16
  • 5 Tbsp butter, divided $0.48
  • 8 oz. mushrooms $1.79
  • 4 Tbsp all-purpose flour $0.06
  • 1/2 cup wild rice blend $1.20
  • 1/2 tsp dried thyme $0.05
  • 1/2 tsp rubbed sage $0.05
  • 1/4 tsp freshly cracked black pepper $0.02
  • 4 cups vegetable broth $0.47
  • 2 cups chopped cooked turkey $3.11
  • 1/3 cup heavy cream $0.55
  • 1/2 tsp salt (or to taste) $0.02

Instructions

  • Dice the onion, slice the carrots and celery, and mince the garlic. Add the onion, carrot, celery, and garlic to a large soup pot with 1 Tbsp butter and sauté over medium heat until the onions are soft.
  • While the vegetables are sautéing, slice the mushrooms. Add the mushrooms to the pot and continue to sauté until the mushrooms are soft.
  • Add the flour and remaining 4 Tbsp butter to the pot. Continue to stir and cook for about one minute more.
  • Add the wild rice, thyme, sage, pepper, and broth to the pot. Stir until all of the flour and butter mixture has dissolved off the vegetables and the bottom of the pot.
  • Place a lid on the pot, turn the heat up to medium-high, and bring the soup up to a boil. Once boiling, turn the heat down to medium-low and let the soup simmer for about 40 minutes, stirring occasionally, or until the rice is tender.
  • Once the rice is tender, add the chopped turkey. Stir to combine and heat through.
  • Stir in the heavy cream, then taste the soup and season with about ½ tsp salt, or to your liking. Enjoy hot with bread for dipping!

See how we calculate recipe costs here.

Nutrition

Serving: 1.75cups | Calories: 472kcal | Carbohydrates: 36g | Protein: 24g | Fat: 27g | Sodium: 1451mg | Fiber: 4g
Close up of a ladle full of turkey and wild rice soup over the pot.

How to Make Turkey and wild rice soup – Step by Step Photos

Carrot, onion, celery, and garlic in the soup pot.

Dice one yellow onion, slice 2 carrots, slice 3 ribs of celery, and mince two cloves of garlic. Add the onion, carrot, celery, and garlic to a large soup pot with 1 Tbsp butter. Sauté over medium heat until the onions are soft.

Sliced mushrooms added to the pot.

While the vegetables are sautéing, slice 8 oz. mushrooms. Add them to the pot and continue to sauté until the mushrooms have softened.

Butter and flour added to the pot.

Add 4 Tbsp butter and ¼ cup flour to the pot. Continue to stir and cook for about one minute more. The flour and butter will form a paste that will coat the vegetables, that is okay.

Wild rice blend and herbs added to the pot.

Add ½ tsp dried thyme, ½ tsp rubbed sage, ¼ tsp pepper, and ½ cup wild rice blend to the pot.

Vegetable broth being poured into the pot.

Add 4 cups of vegetable broth. Stir to combine and dissolve all of the flour and butter off of the vegetables and the bottom of the pot.

Simmered soup in the pot.

Place a lid on the pot, turn the heat up to medium-high, and allow the soup to come to a boil. Once boiling, turn the heat down to medium-low and let it simmer for about 40 minutes, stirring occasionally, or until the wild rice is tender.

Chopped turkey being poured into the pot.

Once the rice is tender, add 2 cups of chopped cooked turkey (or chicken) and stir to combine. Allow the turkey to heat through in the soup.

Cream being stirred into the soup.

Finally, to make the soup extra lush, stir in a ⅓ cup heavy cream.

Finished soup in the pot with a spoon.

Taste the soup and add salt to your liking (I added ½ tsp). Keep in mind that adding a little salt really helps the different flavors pop!

Finished pot of turkey and wild rice soup seen from above.

Serve the Turkey and Wild Rice Soup hot with some hearty bread for dipping!

The post Turkey and Wild Rice Soup appeared first on Budget Bytes.

Chocolate Pecan Slab Pie

Pecans are the great American nut and at no time of the year are they more in demand than around the holidays. There are a lot of different nuts grown in the United States; walnuts, almonds, pistachios, and hazelnuts, but a pie made with toasted pecans is a holiday tradition and every year I have the urge to make one. Recently an American membership-only store…

Pecans are the great American nut and at no time of the year are they more in demand than around the holidays. There are a lot of different nuts grown in the United States; walnuts, almonds, pistachios, and hazelnuts, but a pie made with toasted pecans is a holiday tradition and every year I have the urge to make one.

Recently an American membership-only store opened in France, and while there are many French hypermarchés (mega-stores), this one caused a splash, particularly amongst Americans, because they have things like big rolls of their famous plastic wrap with that superlative cutter, IPA beers, and from what I hear, big bags of pecans.

There’s always been Metro, a similar mega-store that carries more restaurant-supply items. But there’s a huge refrigerator filled with every kind of French cheese (and butter) that you can imagine, sold whole (like an entire wheel of Brie) or butter in large blocks, and they give you down jackets to wear because you want to spend so much time in there. It really is that cold. But you need to be a professional to go there.

I don’t have room for an entire wheel of Brie – and I’m not talking about in my stomach (which I’d be up for trying…), but in my refrigerator – but I do have room for pecans, which I stockpile as the holidays get closer and closer. Over the years, I’ve made Ginger Pecan Pie and Chocolate Pecan Pie with my precious pecans that I haul back from the States because I’m not schlepping out to the boonies on the outskirts of Paris to get a bag of pecans when I can carry them 5500 miles over the Atlantic. (And sometimes pay extra in luggage fees.) That makes sense. Right?

Continue Reading Chocolate Pecan Slab Pie...

Mashed Potatoes

Follow these easy steps to make the smoothest, fluffiest, cloud-like mashed potatoes you’ve ever had! Plus ideas for more flavor add-ins.

The post Mashed Potatoes appeared first on Budget Bytes.

Is there anything better on earth than a big bowl of buttery mashed potatoes? Wait, don’t answer that. Let’s just appreciate how amazing mashed potatoes are in their own right. And if you want to know how to make the creamiest, fluffliest, cloud-like mashed potatoes that you’ve ever had, stick with me. I’m going to show you how it’s done.

Overhead view of a bowl of mashed potatoes with melted butter.

Why Do Mashed Potatoes Get Gluey?

Two things lead to heavy, sticky, gluey mashed potatoes: too much starch and over-whipping or over-stirring. To keep these mashed potatoes light, fluffy, and cloud-like, we rinse the excess starch not once but TWICE during the process, then briefly whip the potatoes after mashing to get them extra smooth and aerated. The result is heavenly.

What Type of Potatoes to Use for Mashed Potatoes

I find that russet potatoes make the lightest and fluffiest mashed potatoes, but if you prefer something a little more dense and stick-to-your-ribs, you can go with something like a red potato or Yukon gold.

Close up side view of a bowl of mashed potatoes with melted butter.

Do I need to Peel the Potatoes?

To peel or not to peel potatoes is totally up to your personal preference. If you’re going for a super smooth and silky mashed potato, you’ll probably want to peel them first. If you want a mashed potato that is a little more rustic, feel free to leave the peels on! The peels do add a nice bit of flavor and texture, which can be fun.

How to Flavor Mashed Potatoes

The recipe below is for a really classic mashed potato, flavored only with milk, butter, salt, and pepper. But there are SO many different ingredients that you can add to mashed potatoes to give them more flavor. Here are some ideas for mashed potato add-ins:

Close up view of a scoop of mashed potatoes on a spoon.
Close up side view of a bowl of mashed potatoes with melted butter.
Print

Mashed Potatoes

Follow these easy steps to make the smoothest, fluffiest, cloud-like mashed potatoes you've ever had! Plus ideas for more flavor add-ins.
Course Dinner, Side Dish
Cuisine American
Total Cost $2.83 recipe / $0.57 serving
Prep Time 15 minutes
Cook Time 10 minutes
Total Time 25 minutes
Servings 5 1 cup each
Calories 274kcal

Equipment

Ingredients

  • 2.5 lbs. russet potatoes $2.00
  • 1/2 tsp salt (to salt the boiling water) $0.02
  • 4 Tbsp butter $0.60
  • 1/2 cup whole milk $0.17
  • 1/2 tsp salt (or to taste) $0.02
  • 1/4 tsp pepper $0.02

Instructions

  • Peel and dice the potatoes into 1-inch cubes. Place the diced potatoes in a colander and rinse well with cool water to remove the excess starch.
  • Place the rinsed potatoes in a pot and add fresh water until the potatoes are covered by one inch. Add ½ tsp salt to the water in the pot.
  • Place a lid on the pot and bring the water up to a boil. Boil the potatoes for 6-7 minutes, or until they are very tender (a fork can pierce the potato effortlessly).
  • Drain the potatoes in a colander and rinse again briefly with warm water.
  • While the potatoes are draining, add the butter and milk to the pot used to boil the potatoes. Heat them over medium until the butter has melted.
  • Add the drained potatoes back to the pot and mash with a potato masher.
  • Season the potatoes with salt and pepper (I used ½ tsp salt and ¼ tsp pepper, but if you use unsalted butter you'll probably want more salt).
  • For extra smooth and fluffy mashed potatoes, use a hand mixer to whip the potatoes until there are no lumps and they are light and cloud-like. Serve and enjoy!

See how we calculate recipe costs here.

Nutrition

Serving: 1cup | Calories: 274kcal | Carbohydrates: 42g | Protein: 6g | Fat: 10g | Sodium: 441mg | Fiber: 3g
Mashed potatoes being scooped out of a bowl.

How to Make Mashed Potatoes – Step by Step Photos

Diced potatoes in a colander.

Peel and dice 2.5 lbs. of russet potatoes (roughly half of a 5 lb. bag) into 1-inch cubes. Place them in a colander and rinse with cool water to remove the excess starch.

Salt being added to a pot full of potatoes and water.

Add the potatoes to a pot and add fresh water until the potatoes are covered by one inch. Add ½ tsp salt to the water.

A fork piercing a potato from the pot.

Place a lid on the pot, turn the heat up to high, and bring the pot up to a boil. Continue to boil the potatoes for 6-7 minutes, or until they are very tender. If there is any firmness left in the potatoes, your mashed potatoes will not be smooth. You can test the doneness by piercing the potatoes with a fork.

Boiled potatoes in a colander after rinsing again.

Drain the potatoes in a colander and rinse briefly with warm water.

Butter and milk in the pot, butter melting.

While the potatoes are in the colander, add 4 Tbsp butter and ½ cup whole milk to the pot that was used to boil the potatoes. Heat the butter and milk until the butter is melted.

Salt and pepper added to mashed potatoes in the pot.

Add the rinsed potatoes back to the pot and mash with a potato masher. Season the potatoes with salt and pepper. I used ½ tsp salt and about ¼ tsp pepper, but if you’re using unsalted butter you may want more salt.

Potatoes being whipped in the pot with a hand mixer.

To make the potatoes extra light and fluffy, beat them with a hand mixer until no lumps remain.

Finished mashed potatoes in the pot being smoothed with a spoon.

Serve the potatoes with your favorite toppings and enjoy!

Close up side view of a bowl of mashed potatoes with melted butter and a spoon.

The post Mashed Potatoes appeared first on Budget Bytes.

Apple Cranberry Pie

This homemade Apple Cranberry Pie is the perfect dessert for the holidays. It always makes an appearance at our dessert table every Thanksgiving and Christmas. It is a showstopper! The pie crust is buttery, flaky, and tender. It is a double crust pie, …

This homemade Apple Cranberry Pie is the perfect dessert for the holidays. It always makes an appearance at our dessert table every Thanksgiving and Christmas. It is a showstopper! The pie crust is buttery, flaky, and tender. It is a double crust pie, so you get pie crust on the bottom and a pretty lattice…

Pumpkin Pie

This pumpkin pie recipe is simple but decadent. With a few of my favorite tricks, you can produce the silkiest pie with the most profound flavors.

The post Pumpkin Pie appeared first on Budget Bytes.

If you’re thinking about making your pumpkin pie this year, this recipe is simple but decadent. With a few of my favorite tricks, you can produce a silky pie with the most profound flavors. And it’s so much better than store-bought! PS I even convinced Beth that the extra steps I take are worth it, and you know how no-nonsense she is!

The Trick To Silky Pumpkin Pie 

Yes, you can buy the cheapest pumpkin puree you can find, mix it with a few ingredients, throw it in a pie shell, and call it a day. But with a little extra work and about a dollar more, you can take your pumpkin pie to the next level. I even convinced Beth, who was totally against taking additional steps and spending extra money UNTIL she tasted my pie. If changing the mind of the Queen of Budgets and Practicality isn’t a mic-drop moment, I don’t know what is. What are the tricks for silky pumpkin pie?

  1. Use high-quality pumpkin puree instead of generic (we used Libby’s).
  2. Cook the filling to bloom the spices and intensify the flavor.
  3. Blend the filling to make it extra silky smooth.

The Best Puree For Pumpkin Pie

The type of puree you use matters. Many pumpkin purees are watery because filling a can with watered-down pumpkin is cheaper than filling it with 100% pumpkin. Many purees blend field pumpkins and squashes that are bitter and bland because they also cost less to produce. The best puree for your money’s worth will always be Libby’s. This is not an ad; it’s just the truth. Libby’s has low water content and is made with a pumpkin variety bred for deep flavor. It’s the only thing they put in the can. If you can’t spring for Libby’s, that’s OK. The following two steps will help make even the cheapest pumpkin puree taste amazing.

Cook Your Pumpkin Pie Filling

Pumpkins are watery beasts. Cooking down their puree eliminates excess liquid and deepens the pumpkin flavor. When you add spices to the pot, the spices bloom. To understand the importance of blooming, think of the moment you add garlic to a hot pan, and the smell goes from sharp to amazing. It’s the same thing with spices. If you add the spices to the puree, you might as well add the sugar. Heat develops deep caramel notes and dissolves the granules, so you don’t end up with a grainy, one-note filling. As you heat it, the puree will start to bubble and burp, and then it will transform into a glossy, fragrant mixture.

Blend Your Pumpkin Pie Filling

To get incredibly velvety pumpkin pie filling, you need to blend it. I know. I know. Nowhere on the back of the can does it mention cooking puree, much less blending it. Just trust me. Pumpkin puree isn’t silky; all you have to do is look at it. Even after cooking it down, it looks coarse. Let it cool for a few minutes, then blend until it lightens. Add the rest of your ingredients, and blend again. One taste, and I promise you’ll never go back to the traditional mix-and-dump method.

Keep The Pie Crust From Getting Soggy

Loads of folks will tell you that you must blind-bake or pre-bake your pie crust so it stays crispy when filling it with pumpkin puree. Feel free to do that if you wish, but I never do, and as you can see from the picture of the crispy, golden, flaky bottom crust above, I get great results.

My trick is to place a rack on the lowest part of the oven. Then I put a sheet pan on the rack and place a cast iron pan in it, bottom side up. (If your cast iron pan does not lay flat, just bake the pie in the pan.) I preheat for an hour. The bottom heating element supercharges the cast iron pan, which holds on to heat like you did your first hundred-dollar bill. Then I bake the pie on top of the over-turned cast iron. That heat focuses on the bottom of the pie, creating the crispiest of crusts. In addition, the sheet pan will collect any run-off juices so the oven doesn’t start to smoke.

Keep A Pumpkin Pie From Burning

The most important step you can take is to use an oven thermometer. Most ovens (I don’t care how fancy they are) aren’t calibrated. A cheap $5 oven thermometer will tell you exactly what temperature it is. If you notice that the crust or the top of the pie is browning early on, tent it with aluminum to prevent it from burning. Tenting is when you loosely place a sheet of aluminum that’s folded in half over the pie like a tent.

Overhead shot of a pumpkin pie.

Keep Pumpkin Pie From Cracking

You need to eliminate sudden temperature changes to prevent your pie from cracking. Leave the oven door closed as much as possible. Opening an oven door even for 15 seconds can change the temperature in your oven by up to 50°.

You also want to pull your pie out of the oven before it looks done. The magic of carry-over cooking will take it to the finish line. Just because the pie isn’t in direct heat doesn’t mean it stops cooking. That heat takes time to dissipate; while it dissipates, it keeps cooking your pie.

Pull the pie when the crust looks golden, and the outer ring of the pie has dulled and looks solid. The middle should still be jiggly. Not wet, but it should move like jello. Allow the pie to cool in a warm place so there’s no sudden temperature change. If your kitchen runs cold, turn the oven off and crack your oven door about 6 inches. Let the pie cool in the oven.

What To Do If Your Pumpkin Pie Cracks

Sometimes, no matter how hard you try, the pie gods deliver a cracked pumpkin pie. You have three choices at this point. First, you can use leftover pie dough and bake a few ornamental leaves to top the pie with. You can also top it with a few dollops of whipped cream. Or you can leave it as is. like we did. If someone dares to complain about a crack in homemade pumpkin pie, they don’t get a slice. 😉

Here’s an easy recipe for pie crust cookies: 

  • Preheat your oven to 350° and line a sheet pan with parchment paper or a silicone mat.
  • Dust your work surface lightly with flour and roll out the leftover pie dough (or the store-bought pie dough) to about 1/4-inch thickness. 
  • Use a cookie cutter or a knife to cut out pieces shaped like leaves. Place the cookie on the sheet pan. 
  • Whisk an egg with a tablespoon of milk and brush the cookies lightly with the egg wash. Sprinkle the cookies lightly with sugar.
  • Bake until they are light golden brown, about 10 minutes. Allow them to cool before topping your pie with them.
Side shot of a slice of pumpkin pie with a dollop of whipped cream on top of it.
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Pumpkin Pie

This pumpkin pie recipe is simple but decadent. With a few of my favorite tricks, you can produce the silkiest pie with the most profound flavors.
Course Dessert
Cuisine American
Total Cost ($7.49 recipe / $0.62 serving)
Prep Time 1 hour 10 minutes
Cook Time 50 minutes
Resting Time 2 hours
Total Time 4 hours
Servings 12 slices
Calories 152kcal

Ingredients

  • 1/2 recipe 3-Ingredient Pie Crust* $1.17
  • 1 3/4 cup pumpkin puree (15 oz can) $2.79
  • 1/2 cup brown sugar $0.22
  • 1 1/2 tsp cinnamon $0.12
  • 1/2 tsp nutmeg $0.04
  • 1 1/2 tsp ground ginger $0.03
  • 1/2 tsp salt $0.04
  • 1 cup sour cream $1.25
  • 1/2 cup whole milk $0.25
  • 1 tsp vanilla $0.58
  • 3 large eggs, room temperature $0.87
  • 1/4 tsp butter, for greasing $0.04
  • 1/4 tsp flour for dusting $0.06
  • 1 tsp heavy cream $0.03

Instructions

  • Place a rack on the lowest part of your oven. Top it with a sheet pan. Place a cast iron pan, bottom side up, in the sheet pan. Preheat your oven to 400°F. Grease a pie dish with butter, dust it with flour, and place it in your freezer. Dust your work surface and roll your pie dough into a 9 x 3-inch rectangle about 1 1/2 inches thick. 
  • Place the long side of the rectangle vertically on your work surface. Fold the top short side towards the center of the rectangle so that the short edge touches the center point. Fold the bottom short side over the center so that it touches the outer edge of the top short side. Roll the dough into a 9×3 rectangle and repeat the folding process a second and a third time. Then chill your pie dough.
  • Set a medium heavy-bottomed pot over medium heat. Add the pumpkin puree, brown sugar, cinnamon, nutmeg, ground ginger, and salt to the pot. 
  • Stir the puree constantly until it begins to thicken and sputter and becomes glossy. Remove from the heat and cool for about 10 minutes.
  • Once the filling has cooled, add it to a blender with the sour cream and milk. Process until it has lightened.
  • Add the vanilla and the eggs to the blender. Mix until the puree is velvety.
  • Dust your work surface with flour and roll out the pie dough into a circle that is 16 inches in diameter. Press the crust into the pie plate. Fold the overhanging edges of the dough under to create a thick lip. Dock the pie crust with a fork by puncturing it about 9 to 10 times. Chill the dough for 10 minutes in the freezer.
  • Crimp the edges of the pie. Add the pumpkin pie filling. Lightly brush the edges of the crust with cream.
  • Place the pie in the preheated 400° oven on top of the overturned cast iron pan—lower the temperature to 350°F. Bake until the outer edges have solidified, but the middle of the pie still has some jiggle, about 50 minutes. Remove the pie from the oven and allow it to cool in a warm spot for at least two hours before serving, so it has time to set.

See how we calculate recipe costs here.

Notes

*Make your pie crust the day before you plan on making your pie. You can also use a store-bought pie crust.

Nutrition

Serving: 1slice | Calories: 152kcal | Carbohydrates: 18g | Protein: 3g | Fat: 8g | Sodium: 164mg | Fiber: 1g

How to Make Pumpkin Pie – Step by Step Photos

Place a rack on the lowest part of your oven. Top it with a sheet pan. Place a cast iron pan, bottom side up, in the sheet pan. Preheat your oven to 400°F. Grease a pie dish with 1/4 tsp butter, dust it with 1/4 tsp flour, and place it in your freezer. Dust your work surface and roll your 1/2 portion of 3-Ingredient Pie Crust into a 9 x 3-inch rectangle about 1 1/2 inches thick. If you are using a store-bought crust, use a single crust, and mash it into a 9×3-inch rectangle.

Place the long side of the rectangle vertically on your work surface. Fold the top short side towards the center of the rectangle so that the short edge touches the center point. Fold the bottom short side over the center so that it touches the outer edge of the top short side. Roll the dough into a 9×3 rectangle and repeat the folding process a second and a third time. Then chill your pie dough.

Set a medium heavy-bottomed pot over medium heat. Add 1 3/4 cups of pumpkin puree, 1/2 cup brown sugar, 1 1/2 tsp cinnamon, 1/2 tsp nutmeg, 1 1/2 tsp ground ginger, and 1/2 tsp salt to the pot. 

Stir the puree constantly until it begins to thicken and sputter and becomes glossy. Remove from the heat and cool for about 10 minutes.

Once the filling has cooled, add it to a blender with the 1 cup sour cream and 1/2 cup milk. Process until it has lightened.

Add the 1 tsp vanilla and the 3 large eggs to the blender. Mix until the puree is velvety.

Dust your work surface with flour and roll out the pie dough into a circle that is 16 inches in diameter. Roll the dough circle onto your rolling pin and unfurl it into the greased and floured pie plate. Press the dough into the pie plate. Fold the overhanging edges of the dough under to create a thick lip. Dock the pie crust with a fork by puncturing it about 9 to 10 times. Chill the dough for 10 minutes in the freezer.

Pour the filling into the pie crust. To ensure there are no bubbles in the puree, allow it to settle for a minute, and then gently pick the pie plate about an inch off the counter and drop it. Continue picking it up and dropping it gently until no more air bubbles come to the surface of the puree.
Crimp the edges of the pie. Add the pumpkin pie filling. Lightly brush the edges of the crust with 1 tsp cream.

Place the pie in the preheated 400° oven on top of the overturned cast iron pan—lower the temperature to 350°F. Bake until the outer edges have solidified, but the middle of the pie still has some jiggle, about 50 minutes. Remove the pie from the oven and allow it to cool in a warm spot for at least two hours before serving, so it has time to set. Slice it up, and enjoy!

More Easy Dessert Pies

The post Pumpkin Pie appeared first on Budget Bytes.

Spiced Pumpkin Banana Bread

This spiced pumpkin banana bread is incredibly moist and flavorful, infused with seasonal spices and topped with pumpkin seeds for extra texture and crunch. Pumpkin and banana aren’t necessarily an obvious combination, but together they make for a stunning seasonal twist on a classic banana bread that’s perfect with your morning coffee (or with your […]

The post Spiced Pumpkin Banana Bread first appeared on Love and Olive Oil.

This spiced pumpkin banana bread is incredibly moist and flavorful, infused with seasonal spices and topped with pumpkin seeds for extra texture and crunch.

Pumpkin and banana aren’t necessarily an obvious combination, but together they make for a stunning seasonal twist on a classic banana bread that’s perfect with your morning coffee (or with your afternoon tea).

Sliced Spiced Pumpkin Banana Bread on a ceramic serving dish, with knife, cup of coffee and dish of pepitas on a gray background.

When you can’t decide between banana bread and pumpkin bread, why not make both? 

But really though, I love both banana bread and pumpkin bread, and who says the two have to be mutually exclusive, anyway? Certainly not me. In fact, putting them together is something I should have done years ago.

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Monkey Bread

If you’re looking for an easy, absolute knockout dessert, try making the buttery, caramelized, pull-apart cinnamon loaf known as Monkey Bread.

The post Monkey Bread appeared first on Budget Bytes.

When it comes to desserts, the easier, the better. Am I right? Well, if you’re looking for an effortless, absolute knockout sweet treat, you’ve found it in Monkey Bread. This buttery, caramelized, pull-apart cinnamon loaf can be made with a handful of ingredients and just a few minutes of work. Bonus: you’re supposed to eat it with your hands, so don’t worry about putting out any plates! It’s time to bring a new favorite to your table!

Side shot of hand pulling a piece of monkey bread out of a loaf.

What Is Monkey Bread Made Of

In its simplest form, Monkey Bread is chopped biscuit dough baked in butter and cinnamon sugar. Think of it like a pillowy, pull-apart, caramelized cinnamon toast. But, you know, without the crunch. In other words: pure, unadulterated heaven.

Why Is It Called Monkey Bread?

Some say Monkey Bread got its name because its texture resembles the rind of an African fruit often eaten by monkeys. Others say it gets its name from how you eat it- by picking off a piece at a time- which looks like the grooming rituals of primates. I prefer the fruit story. I don’t want to think about monkeys picking fleas off each other. But you do you.

Overhead shot of monkey bread on white plate with a few pieces picked out of it .

What Pans Can You Use For Monkey Bread

You can bake Monkey Bread in almost any oven-safe pan, but your choice of pan will definitely affect your results. The best option is a bundt pan because it allows hot air to circulate through the middle of the loaf and cooks the dense biscuit dough evenly. But a pie pan will also work, especially if you place a small, oven-safe ramekin in the middle to help the center of the loaf rise evenly.

What Do You Serve With Monkey Bread

Pair Monkey Bread with savory brunch dishes. Or serve it as a dessert with a strong cup of coffee, a floral tea, or a cold glass of milk. If you want something to break up the sweetness, serve it with salty fresh farmer’s cheese.

How To Store Leftovers

Keep any leftovers out of the fridge, as cool temperatures tend to harden and dry out the dough. Instead, store Monkey Bread at room temperature in an air-tight container. It will keep for a day or two. For more extended storage, freezing is your best bet. Portion it before freezing, as you only want to thaw it once. Wrap it in plastic, then aluminum, and then place it in a freezer-safe container. It should keep for about a month. Then warm it in a 250°F oven for about 20 minutes.

Overhead shot of monkey bread on white plate.
Side shot of hand pulling a piece of monkey bread out of a loaf.
Print

Monkey Bread

If you're looking for an easy, absolute knockout dessert, try making the buttery, caramelized, pull-apart cinnamon loaf known as Monkey Bread.
Course Dessert
Cuisine American
Total Cost ($7.53 recipe / $0.63 serving)
Prep Time 15 minutes
Cook Time 40 minutes
Total Time 55 minutes
Servings 12 cups
Calories 509kcal

Ingredients

  • 1 cup salted butter $2.40
  • 1 cup brown sugar $0.45
  • 1/3 cup heavy whipping cream $0.55
  • 2 tsp cinnamon $0.04
  • 1/2 tsp vanilla $0.36
  • 2 cans biscuit dough, 16 oz each $3.38

Instructions

  • Set a rack in the middle of your oven and preheat it to 375°F. Set a light-colored saucepan over medium heat. Add the butter and reserve the wrappers. The butter will melt, foam, and then the milk solids will caramelize into light golden-brown specks, creating brown butter. Using a light-colored pan will help you see the color change as the butter browns.
  • Add the brown sugar to the pan.
  • Whisk until the brown sugar has completely incorporated with the brown butter and is no longer crystallized. It will form a caramel.
  • Take the pan off the heat and add the cream. Whisk until it has completely incorporated into the caramel.
  • Whisk in the vanilla and the cinnamon.
  • Grease a Bundt pan with the butter wrappers. Add more butter if necessary. While the caramel cools, quarter each of the sixteen biscuits.
  • Dip each biscuit piece into the cooled caramel, then layer it in the Bundt pan.*
  • Top the Monkey Bread with any remaining caramel.
  • Bake at 375°F for 35 to 40 minutes, or until the top of the Monkey Bread springs back when touched.
  • Allow the loaf to cool before inverting it onto a serving dish.

See how we calculate recipe costs here.

Notes

*Please allow the caramel to cool so that you don’t burn yourself when dipping the biscuits into it. Don’t let it get cold, but don’t get your skin anywhere near hot caramel. 

Nutrition

Calories: 509kcal | Carbohydrates: 56g | Protein: 5g | Fat: 30g | Sodium: 854mg | Fiber: 1g
Overhead shot of monkey bread on white plate.

How to Make Monkey Bread – Step By Step Photos

Overhead shot of butter browning in a pot.

Set a rack in the middle of your oven and preheat it to 375°F. Set a light-colored pan over medium heat and add the butter. Reserve the butter wrappers. The butter will melt, foam, and then the milk solids will caramelize into light golden-brown specks, creating brown butter.

Overhead shot of brown sugar being cooked in a pot with butter.

Add the brown sugar to the pan.

Overhead shot of hand mixing caramel in a pot with a whisk.

Whisk until the brown sugar has completely incorporated with the brown butter and is no longer crystallized. It will have formed a caramel.

Overhead shot of hand mixing caramel and cream in a pot with a whisk.

Take the pan off the heat and add the cream. Whisk until it has completely incorporated into the caramel.

Overhead shot of hand stirring caramel with a whisk in a pot and a second hand adding vanilla to the pot with a measuring spoon.

Whisk in the vanilla and cinnamon.

Overhead shot of knife cutting canned biscuit rounds.

Grease a Bundt pan with the butter wrappers. Add more butter if necessary. While the caramel cools, quarter each of the sixteen biscuits.

Overhead shot of hand dipping a biscuit piece into a bowl of caramel with pieces of biscuits and a Bundt pant next to it.

Dip each biscuit piece into the cooled caramel, then layer it in the Bundt pan. Please make sure the caramel has cooled so you do not burn yourself.

Overhead shot of raw Monkey Bread in a Bundt pan.

Top the Monkey Bread with any remaining caramel.

Overhead shot of baked Monkey Bread in a Bundt pan.

Bake at 375°F for 35 to 40 minutes, or until the top of the Monkey Bread springs back when touched.

Overhead shot of monkey bread on white plate.

Allow the loaf to cool before inverting it onto a serving dish. Serve as a whole loaf, and let your loved ones go to town!

The post Monkey Bread appeared first on Budget Bytes.