Banana & Hazelnut Sharing Pancake

Thanks to Lyle’s Golden Syrup for sponsoring this post Every year I look forward to pancake day – it’s usually in close proximity to my birthday and they’re also one of my all-time favourite things to make! I love to change up the flavours and try different types of pancake from savoury, dinner-appropriate ones to luxuriously dessert-y options. This recipe is definitely a dessert-appropriate pancake – it makes a BIG fluffy one, like a cross between a souffle pancake and an American-style pancake, perfect for sharing between 2 for dessert (so perfect for Valentine’s day). To take things up a notch I caramelised some cut bananas in butter and Lyle’s golden syrup for a gooey sweetness which isn’t too overbearing. A handful of crushed hazelnuts stirred in with the bananas at the end adds a little crunch to each bite. Of course, I drizzled the pancake with a bit more Lyle’s Golden Syrup before serving as it’s an essential pancake topping! I also added a dollop of yoghurt (or you can go with whipped cream or even vanilla ice cream).

The post Banana & Hazelnut Sharing Pancake appeared first on Izy Hossack – Top With Cinnamon.

a large sharing pancake topped with caramelised bananas and yoghurt on a table setting with flowers

Thanks to Lyle’s Golden Syrup for sponsoring this post

Every year I look forward to pancake day – it’s usually in close proximity to my birthday and they’re also one of my all-time favourite things to make! I love to change up the flavours and try different types of pancake from savoury, dinner-appropriate ones to luxuriously dessert-y options.

a sharing pancake topped with caramelised bananas and hazelnuts

This recipe is definitely a dessert-appropriate pancake – it makes a BIG fluffy one, like a cross between a souffle pancake and an American-style pancake, perfect for sharing between 2 for dessert (so perfect for Valentine’s day). To take things up a notch I caramelised some cut bananas in butter and Lyle’s golden syrup for a gooey sweetness which isn’t too overbearing. A handful of crushed hazelnuts stirred in with the bananas at the end adds a little crunch to each bite.

Of course, I drizzled the pancake with a bit more Lyle’s Golden Syrup before serving as it’s an essential pancake topping! I also added a dollop of yoghurt (or you can go with whipped cream or even vanilla ice cream).

Banana & Hazelnut Sharing Pancake

Banana & Hazelnut Sharing Pancake

Yield: serves 2
Prep Time: 15 minutes
Cook Time: 15 minutes
Total Time: 30 minutes

A big fluffy pancake (for two!) topped with caramelised bananas and chopped hazelnuts, perfect for sharing.

Ingredients

Pancake batter:

  • 70g plain white flour
  • 1 tbsp granulated sugar
  • 3/4 tsp baking powder
  • 120ml milk
  • 2 eggs, separated
  • 15g (1 tbsp) butter, melted
  • Pinch fine table salt
  • 1 tbsp vegetable oil

Caramelised bananas:

  • 2 tbsp Lyle’s Golden Syrup, plus more for drizzling
  • 15g (1 tbsp) unsalted butter
  • 2 ripe bananas, peeled and halved lengthways or cut into rounds
  • 30g hazelnuts, crushed

Instructions

For the pancake:

  1. Place the flour, sugar, baking powder, milk and egg yolks into a bowl. Stir with a whisk to combine to a smooth batter. Melt the butter in a medium non-stick frying pan then remove from the heat and add to the bowl, stirring to combine.
  2. In a separate bowl whisk the egg whites with the salt until you get stiff peaks. Take 1/3 of the beaten whites and mix them into the batter. Add the remaining egg whites and fold in gently until combined.
  3. Heat the oil in the same frying pan you were using earlier over a medium-low heat. Pour in the pancake batter and cover with a lid. Leave to cook for around 5-6 minutes until the top of the pancake looks almost fully set and the bottom of the pancake is golden brown. Use a spatula to gently loosen the pancake from the pan and then flip over (I find using 2 metal spatulas to be the best way to do this). Cook until the other side is golden (1-2 minutes) then slide the pancake out onto a serving plate.

For the bananas:

  1. Heat the Lyle’s Golden Syrup and butter in the frying pan over a medium heat. Once melted, add the bananas cut side down to the pan and cook until softened and golden underneath. Stir in the hazelnuts and then pour the contents of the pan over the cooked pancake.
  2. Serve with a drizzle of Lyle’s Golden Syrup and a dollop of
    yoghurt or whipped cream if you’d like.



 









Have you made this recipe?
I’d love to see how it went! Tag me on instagram @izyhossack and hashtag it #topwithcinnamon so I can have a look & reshare in my stories!

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No-Knead Cinnamon-Pecan Babka

This recipe was created as part of a paid collaboration with Lyle’s Golden Syrup on Instagram but I’m posting it here too for ease of access! We all love a babka don’t we? So much more impressive looking than cinnamon rolls AND it’s sliceable (which means you can whack a slice under the grill until toasty and then cover it in butter). Whilst chocolate babka will always be my favourite kind I of course have an affinity to a cinnamony babka. It’s like a fancy cinnamon-swirl loaf! Perfect for turning into French toast when it gets a little bit stale and not too sweet overall. I added pecans to the filling since I always seem to find that they work well with cinnamon and brown sugar. This one is a no-knead boy which means that yes, you do need to make the dough the day before (I leave it for at least 10 hours in the fridge), but it also means that it makes the process seem more manageable since it’s broken up by that waiting period. The dough is one I adapted very slightly from the incredibly clever book by Zoe Francois, Holiday & Celebration Breads in 5 Minutes […]

The post No-Knead Cinnamon-Pecan Babka appeared first on Izy Hossack – Top With Cinnamon.

This recipe was created as part of a paid collaboration with Lyle’s Golden Syrup on Instagram but I’m posting it here too for ease of access!

We all love a babka don’t we? So much more impressive looking than cinnamon rolls AND it’s sliceable (which means you can whack a slice under the grill until toasty and then cover it in butter). Whilst chocolate babka will always be my favourite kind I of course have an affinity to a cinnamony babka. It’s like a fancy cinnamon-swirl loaf! Perfect for turning into French toast when it gets a little bit stale and not too sweet overall. I added pecans to the filling since I always seem to find that they work well with cinnamon and brown sugar.

cinnamon pecan babka on a plate

This one is a no-knead boy which means that yes, you do need to make the dough the day before (I leave it for at least 10 hours in the fridge), but it also means that it makes the process seem more manageable since it’s broken up by that waiting period. The dough is one I adapted very slightly from the incredibly clever book by Zoe Francois, Holiday & Celebration Breads in 5 Minutes a Day.

Soaking the baked loaf with a syrup made of diluted golden syrup is also key – the loaf really isn’t that sweet so the syrup does help to boost that but ALSO keeps the loaf moist and soft so don’t skip it!!

No-Knead Cinnamon-Pecan Babka

No-Knead Cinnamon-Pecan Babka

Yield: 1 (2lb) loaf
Prep Time: 30 minutes
Cook Time: 30 minutes
Additional Time: 12 hours
Total Time: 13 hours

Ingredients

Dough:

  • 100g lukewarm water
  • 1 tbsp Lyle’s golden syrup
  • 1 tsp easy-bake yeast
  • 1 medium egg
  • 45g vegetable oil
  • 250g white bread flour
  • ½ tsp fine table salt

Filling:

  • 50g unsalted butter, melted and cooled
  • 60g muscovado sugar
  • 30g Lyle’s golden syrup
  • 5g ground cinnamon
  • Pinch of salt
  • 75g pecans, roughly chopped

Syrup:

  • 50g Lyle’s golden syrup
  • 50g water

Instructions

For the dough:

  1. Place the water, golden syrup, yeast, egg and oil in a medium bowl and mix until combined. Add the flour and salt and stir together until the dough comes together and there are no floury patches remaining (it may be easier near the end of mixing to use your hands to knead it lightly in the bowl).
  2. Drizzle a little bit of vegetable oil on the dough and flip it over a couple of times so the dough is coated in oil. Cover the bowl (I like to use a small, clean bin bag, secured at the side with a food clip) and let rise in a warm place until doubled in volume – around 2 hours.
  3. Once risen, chill the dough overnight. This will do the ‘kneading’ for us and also makes the dough easier to handle when it’s time to shape.

For the filling:

  1. The next day, combine all of the filling ingredients except the pecans in a small bowl. Set aside.

Shape the babka:

  1. Lightly flour a work surface and tip the chilled dough out onto it. Dust with some more flour on top and roll out into a 25 x 30cm rectangle. Spread all of the filling over the surface of the dough and sprinkle with the chopped pecans.
  2. Starting at the long edge, roll the dough up tightly into a log. Pop onto a tray or plate and freeze for 15 minutes – this will keep things neat and easy for the next step.
  3. Remove the dough log from the freezer and cut down the length of the log so you end up with two long strips. Place the cut sides facing up and twist the lengths over each other a few times, pinching the ends to seal.
  4. Carefully transfer the shaped dough to a lined 2lb loaf pan, cover, and leave to rise in a warm place for 45 minutes-1 hour, or until almost doubled in volume.
  5. Around 10 minutes before your dough is ready, preheat the oven to 180C fan. Uncover the babka and bake for 25-35 minutes. It’ll be done when a skewer inserted into the centre comes out with no dough attached.

For the syrup:

  1. As the babka is baking, warm the golden syrup and water in a small pot just until it starts to gently bubble.
  2. Pour the warm syrup over the hot babka and leave it to soak in and cool before slicing and serving.

Have you made this recipe?
I’d love to see how it went! Tag me on instagram @izyhossack and hashtag it #topwithcinnamon so I can have a look & reshare in my stories!

The post No-Knead Cinnamon-Pecan Babka appeared first on Izy Hossack - Top With Cinnamon.

Cranzac Cookies

When the lockdown was announced about a month ago, I thought of all the great things I would finally be able to do. I would finally tackle those five- to seven-season tv series that everyone told me that I just had to watch, that require a hundred-hour commitment to get through them. (Breaking Bad and The Wire, I’m looking at you…) I would have the…

When the lockdown was announced about a month ago, I thought of all the great things I would finally be able to do. I would finally tackle those five- to seven-season tv series that everyone told me that I just had to watch, that require a hundred-hour commitment to get through them. (Breaking Bad and The Wire, I’m looking at you…) I would have the time to go through all those folders of paperwork that pile up like a fallen cheerleader formation when you live somewhere where paperwork is as common (but not as welcome) as wine.

Or I might finally tackle The Goldfinch (769 pages) or finish A Little Life. I only made it to page 30 (of 720 pages) of the latter before my brain felt like an Escher print.

Yet none of those things have happened. I ended up launching a daily Apéro Hour on my Instagram IGTV channel and found myself doing a lot more cooking and baking and writing. I try to squeeze in a little exercise either following videos on YouTube or taking online Pilates classes, and ended up revisiting some vintage recipes, including my variation of one by Marcella Hazan. But I dug into my own personal cookbook archives to make these Cranzac Cookies, and I almost wish I didn’t, because I could not stop eating them. Continue Reading Cranzac Cookies...

Graham Crackers (vegan option)

Light, crisp and sweet with a hint of spices to balance them, these graham crackers are surprisingly easy to make and very moreish! Whenever we visit the States, my mum and I always buy a box of Graham crackers to snack on (and some to bring home to the UK!). They have such a light, airy texture to them and a strong scent of vanilla, it’s very easy to eat a lot of them in one go. What is the UK equivalent of a graham cracker? We don’t really have anything that is specifically like a graham cracker in the UK. In cheesecake bases where recipes indicate using graham cracker crumbs, we would typically use digestive biscuits. Digestives are slightly similar in that they are quite plain, wholegrain-y, crisp ‘biscuits’/cookies. They have a very different flavour and texture though so it’s not really the same thing (however they will do in recipes like the cheesecake base mentioned). What is the ‘graham’ in graham crackers? Unlike what me and Andy joke about, ‘Graham’ is not just some dude who realllly likes crackers. It refers to the specific type of flour – graham flour- used in the crackers. It’s a fine, whole […]

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homemade graham crackers separated on a baking sheet

Light, crisp and sweet with a hint of spices to balance them, these graham crackers are surprisingly easy to make and very moreish!

a bowl of ingredients for making homemade graham crackers

Whenever we visit the States, my mum and I always buy a box of Graham crackers to snack on (and some to bring home to the UK!). They have such a light, airy texture to them and a strong scent of vanilla, it’s very easy to eat a lot of them in one go.

What is the UK equivalent of a graham cracker?

We don’t really have anything that is specifically like a graham cracker in the UK. In cheesecake bases where recipes indicate using graham cracker crumbs, we would typically use digestive biscuits. Digestives are slightly similar in that they are quite plain, wholegrain-y, crisp ‘biscuits’/cookies. They have a very different flavour and texture though so it’s not really the same thing (however they will do in recipes like the cheesecake base mentioned).

homemade graham cracker dough with hands holding it

What is the ‘graham’ in graham crackers?

Unlike what me and Andy joke about, ‘Graham’ is not just some dude who realllly likes crackers. It refers to the specific type of flour – graham flour- used in the crackers. It’s a fine, whole wheat flour which seems pretty hard to get hold of outside of the US. I just use a wholemeal pastry flour which has a low protein content to make sure the crackers are tender. You can’t use a wholemeal bread flour here as that will make the dough heavy.

What gives graham crackers their flavour?

In regular graham crackers, the flavour comes from honey, cinnamon and vanilla. I’ve found that the vanilla flavouring used commercially is an artificial vanilla flavouring which is particularly strong. So, if you want to mimic that specific flavour, you’ll need to get some of the clear vanilla imitation flavouring (e.g. this Wilton one). You can use a ‘real’ vanilla extract in the dough but it will taste less like the shop bought ones.

I’ve used golden syrup in these crackers instead of honey as I prefer the flavour and I like the very crisp texture you get in the end. I’ve tested them with a runny, light honey too and that works well (plus is easier to get in some parts of the world).

cutting out graham cracker dough
docking graham cracker dough with a chopstick

How are graham crackers made?

A dough is formed from dry ingredients of the whole wheat flour, cinnamon, salt, sugar and raising agents. I like to use baker’s ammonia (ammonium bicarbonate) as the raising agent as it provides the lightest, crispest texture to baked goods like this. However, you can use bicarbonate of soda as I know most people won’t have baker’s ammonia to hand! I add a lil bit of ground cardamom to the dough as well for a slightly spicy, background note.

We rub butter (or vegan butter) into the dry ingredients which coats the flour particles in fat, preventing some gluten formation once the liquids are added. That helps to give a nice ‘short’ (i.e. crumbly, snappy) texture to the crackers and prevents them becoming chewy.

Last of all, the wet ingredients – some syrup, a bit of milk and the vanilla. That’s mixed until we get a soft dough and then chilled so it gets less sticky and easier to roll out.

I like to roll the chilled disk out on a piece of baking paper so that I can get the dough really thin. I score the dough and then bake it straight on the same piece of baking paper. I also dock the dough before baking – I used a chopstick end (a la Bravetart) to get a more authentic look. You can use a fork to dock it though to speed things up! The docking helps the dough rise more evenly and become less puffy when baking. I bake the dough as one huge sheet so that as it spreads, the lines stay straight. If you cut them and bake the crackers as individual squares, the edges spread out and become less clean. This is also why I leave the uneven edges in place as the cracker bakes (plus it provides a buffer for if any of the dough around the edges darkens too much).

Once baked, you can finally snap the huge cracker along the score lines into lil squares! Pop them into an airtight container and they’ll actually stay crisp for ages – a few weeks at least.

snapping a large homemade graham cracker sheet into smaller crackers

Graham Crackers

Graham Crackers

Yield: 70-80, 5cm (2-inch) square crackers
Prep Time: 15 minutes
Cook Time: 20 minutes
Additional Time: 30 minutes
Total Time: 1 hour 5 minutes

Ingredients

  • 120g (1 cup) plain white (all-purpose) flour
  • 110g (1 cup minus 1 tbsp) wholemeal (whole wheat) pastry flour
  • 1/2 tsp bicarbonate of soda (baking soda) or bakers ammonia
  • 1/4 tsp fine table salt
  • 1 1/2 tsp ground cinnamon
  • 50g (1/4 cup) granulated sugar
  • 2 pods green cardamom
  • 70g (5 tbsp) unsalted butter or vegan butter
  • 75g (3 1/2 tbsp) golden syrup (see notes)
  • 2-3 tbsp milk or non-dairy milk (I use oat milk)
  • 1 tsp vanilla extract

Instructions

Make the dough:

  1. Combine both of the flours, the bicarb (or ammonia), salt, cinnamon and sugar in a medium bowl. Bash the cardamom pods in a pestle and mortar to break them open, push out the seeds and discard the papery skin. Grind the seeds in the pestle and mortar into a fine powder. Add this to the bowl of dry ingredients too. (If you want to make the dough in a food processor, see the recipe notes below)
  2. Cut the butter into smallish cubes and add to the bowl. Use your fingertips to rub the butter into the dry ingredients until no large lumps of butter remain and the mixture is crubmly. Add the golden syrup, milk (start with 2 tbsp for now) and vanilla extract to the bowl. Use a spoon to stir together to make a moist, soft dough. If it seems too dry, drizzle in a bit more milk and knead it in with your hands.
  3. Divide the dough in half, form into 2 balls and then flatten into disks. Place into a reusable sandwich bag and chill for at least 30 minutes so the dough can firm up.

Roll, shape & bake:

  1. Preheat the oven to 160°C fan (320°F) and grab a large cookie sheet/baking tray (I like to use one without a rim for this but a rimmed sheet is fine).
  2. Cut a piece of baking paper to the size of your baking tray. Place the baking paper on your work surface and dust with some plain flour. Take one disk of dough from the fridge and place onto the baking paper. Dust with more flour. Use a rolling pin to roll it out until the dough is about 2mm thick, dusting with flour as needed to prevent it sticking to the rolling pin.
  3. Cut into 5cm (2-inch) squares and leave them connected like this. We will bake the dough as one big sheet so that the crackers stay in a neat shape, then break them up once they're baked! Dock the crackers all over with a fork (or the small end of a chopstick if you want a more authentic look).
  4. Lift the sheet of dough up with the baking paper still underneath it, and lay onto your cookie sheet. Get them into the oven and bake for 10 minutes. Rotate the cookie sheet so that the crackers can bake evenly. Lower the oven temperature to 140°C fan (280°F) and bake for a further 10 minutes.
  5. Remove from the oven and break along the score lines into squares. Allow to cool and then transfer to an airtight container. Repeat with the remaining disk of dough as above.
  6. They will keep for a couple of weeks like this, if they start to soften just lay on a cookie sheet in an oven at 120°C fan (250°F) and bake for 5-10 minutes until crisp again.

Notes

- Make the dough in a food processor: combine the dry ingredients (as in step 1) but place them into the bowl of a food processor. Add the cubed butter and pulse together until no large pieces of butter remain. Add the syrup, milk and vanilla and blend until you get a soft dough.

- You can also use a light, runny honey in place of some/all of the golden syrup (although this won't be vegan).

- I add cardamom to the dough for a bit more of a fragrant flavour. You don't have to do this if you don't like it though.

Have you made this recipe?
I’d love to see how it went! Tag me on instagram @izyhossack and hashtag it #topwithcinnamon so I can have a look & reshare in my stories!

The post Graham Crackers (vegan option) appeared first on Izy Hossack - Top With Cinnamon.