How to Make a Vegan “Charcuterie” Board

It’s party time, friends! We don’t know about you, but nothing says “party” to us more than an abundance of delicious, beautiful, and satisfying snacks — and nothing says “snacks” better than a charcuterie board!
When crafting this delectable display, …

How to Make a Vegan “Charcuterie” Board

It’s party time, friends! We don’t know about you, but nothing says “party” to us more than an abundance of delicious, beautiful, and satisfying snacks — and nothing says “snacks” better than a charcuterie board!

When crafting this delectable display, we made sure to hit all the marks (salty, sweet, savory, and spicy!) while keeping it super versatile and approachable.

How to Make a Vegan “Charcuterie” Board from Minimalist Baker →

Amaretto Amaretti Thumbprint Cookies

Wouldn’t you know, my always popular soft amaretti cookies work surprisingly well in thumbprint form, filled with amaretto-spiked jam or chocolate ganache. Amaretti cookies are a reader favorite for a reason: these soft and chewy almond cookies are incredibly easy and ever-so versatile, not to mention naturally gluten free! This fun thumbprint version can be […]

The post Amaretto Amaretti Thumbprint Cookies first appeared on Love and Olive Oil.

Wouldn’t you know, my always popular soft amaretti cookies work surprisingly well in thumbprint form, filled with amaretto-spiked jam or chocolate ganache.

Amaretti cookies are a reader favorite for a reason: these soft and chewy almond cookies are incredibly easy and ever-so versatile, not to mention naturally gluten free! This fun thumbprint version can be filled with just about anything, and makes for a perfect addition to your holiday cookie plate.

Rows of Amaretti Thumbprint Cookies in neat rows on a wire rack, alternating between three kinds of filling.

You all can’t get enough of my amaretti morbidi, or soft amaretti cookies. I mean, I wouldn’t have 11 variations in the archives if you didn’t.

I mean, talk about a versatile recipe… so far we’ve tried all sorts of flavors from chocolate to ube, swapped the almond flour for pistachio and hazelnut, mixed in sprinkles, vegan-ified them, and even stuffed them.

But the question today is… will they thumbprint?

I was optimistic they would, considering they usually hold their shape quite well when baking.

The only potential issue I could foresee was the cracking, which I usually encourage in the regular versions (the cracks being what make these cookies so stunning to begin with!) But I worried the cracks would be too big and the filling would ooze out.

Amaretto Amaretti Thumbprint cookies on a gray background, with bowls of the various filling options messily scattered around

I was, however, pleasantly surprised at just how well they transformed into thumbprints (not all cookie recipes can claim such versatility you know).

The cracking is still a concern, but is manageable with a slightly different technique than you may be used to for other thumbprint cookie recipes. Basically, you just need to be very gentle when you’re shaping the thumbprints not to let the cracks get too big, especially if you opt for a looser filling.

The thumbprint version bakes more quickly than the original cookies (give them a few more minutes if you want a bit of crunch on the bottoms), and I still recommend using two stacked cookie sheets to keep the bottoms from browning too quickly.

(more…)

Thumbprint Cookies

I love creating new cookie recipes, but I also love the classics. One of our favorite cookies to make at Christmas time are Thumbprint Cookies. They are a holiday favorite and a great addition to any cookie platter. So what are Thumbprint Cookies? If y…

I love creating new cookie recipes, but I also love the classics. One of our favorite cookies to make at Christmas time are Thumbprint Cookies. They are a holiday favorite and a great addition to any cookie platter. So what are Thumbprint Cookies? If you haven’t had a jam thumbprint, you are in for a…

The post Thumbprint Cookies appeared first on Two Peas & Their Pod.

Chocolate, Tahini and Buckwheat Marble Cake with Chocolate Glaze

Gosh, it seems so long ago when food blogging started. But once word got out, others started jumping in. Not only were there new and even more diverse voices from around the world to be heard, but the next geners were better with their cameras than the rest of us were, setting the standards for the future. (For me, it was quite a learning curve….

Gosh, it seems so long ago when food blogging started. But once word got out, others started jumping in. Not only were there new and even more diverse voices from around the world to be heard, but the next geners were better with their cameras than the rest of us were, setting the standards for the future. (For me, it was quite a learning curve. All I used to know how to do was bake cookies and cakes!) One who really stood out was Aran Goyoaga of Cannelle et Vanille. Her photographs were stunning, she was also from the Basque region, from a family of pastry chefs, so her recipes were solid too.

As people like Pim of Chez Pim went on to open a series of amazing Thai restaurants and earning a Michelin star, Clotilde became a personal coach, Adam of Amateur Gourmet moved to LA to be a screenwriter, Graham of Noodle Pie became an editor and writing coach, Elise, who moved back home with her parents and learned how to cook, sold her massively successful blog, and Matt of MattBites became a much sought-after food photographer, and Aran opened her own photography studio and wrote three cookbooks, including her newest Canelle et Vanille Bakes Simple. Whew!…has time flown by or what?

Continue Reading Chocolate, Tahini and Buckwheat Marble Cake with Chocolate Glaze...

Raspberry Oatmeal Bars

I don’t do desserts too often, and when I do they’re usually made with simple pantry staples that I know I’m already going to have on hand. These super easy Raspberry Oatmeal Bars are the perfect example. They’re just flour, oats, sugar, baking soda, butter, and whatever jam you happen to have (in this case […]

The post Raspberry Oatmeal Bars appeared first on Budget Bytes.

I don’t do desserts too often, and when I do they’re usually made with simple pantry staples that I know I’m already going to have on hand. These super easy Raspberry Oatmeal Bars are the perfect example. They’re just flour, oats, sugar, baking soda, butter, and whatever jam you happen to have (in this case raspberry). This is the perfect fun weekend baking project for when you don’t want to go out to get more ingredients and you don’t want to make anything that is too difficult, but you definitely want something sweet. 😉 

Originally posted 5-23-2010, updated 8-25-2021.

A stack of raspberry oatmeal bars viewed from the side

What Do They Taste Like?

These raspberry oatmeal bars are basically made out of the same mix that you’d use as a crumb topping for a pie. It’s rich, buttery, and has a good amount of texture, thanks to the rolled oats. When you compress this mix into a baking dish it becomes more solid and provides a base layer for the bars, but when you sprinkle it over top, it acts more like a loose crumb topping. And then you can put whatever flavor jam you like in the center!

Do Raspberry Oatmeal Bars Need to Be Refrigerated?

While you don’t need to store the baked oatmeal bars in a refrigerator, they hold their shape better when chilled, so I do prefer to keep mine refrigerated. Make sure they’re in an air-tight container to prevent them from absorbing odor and moisture.

Can I Use Quick Oats?

I used old-fashioned rolled oats for this recipe because they provide a lot more texture to the crumble mixture. You can use quick oats, which as smaller, softer pieces, in place of the rolled oats if needed.

A hand holding a stack of raspberry oatmeal bars close to the camera

A hand holding a stack of raspberry oatmeal bars close to the camera

Raspberry Oatmeal Bars

These easy Raspberry Oatmeal bars are a fast fix for your sweet tooth and they only require a few pantry staples plus your favorite jam!
Total Cost $2.86 recipe / $0.32 serving
Prep Time 15 minutes
Cook Time 30 minutes
Total Time 45 minutes
Servings 9
Calories 325kcal
Author Beth - Budget Bytes

Ingredients

  • 8 Tbsp Butter $0.88
  • 1 cup all-purpose flour $0.10
  • 1 cup rolled oats $0.18
  • 1/2 cup brown sugar $0.32
  • 1/4 tsp baking soda $0.02
  • 1/8 tsp salt $0.01
  • 1 cup raspberry jam $1.35

Instructions

  • Preheat the oven to 350ºF. Use a ½ tsp of the butter to grease the inside of an 8x8-inch baking dish.
  • In a large bowl, combine the flour, oats, brown sugar, baking soda, and salt.
  • Cut the remaining butter into chunks, add it to the bowl with the flour and oat mixture, and use your hands to work the butter into the mixture until everything looks sort of crumbly or like damp sand, and no large lumps of butter remain.
  • Pour half of the oat mixture into the baking dish and press it down until it forms a solid layer.
  • Stir the jam to break up any clumps, then drop the jam in small spoonfuls onto the pressed oat mixture in the baking dish. Try to stay away from adding the jam too close to the edges. It's okay if the jam doesn't form a solid layer. Do not try to spread it with a spoon or knife.
  • Once all of the jam has been added on top of the bottom oat layer, sprinkle the remaining oat mixture on top, leaving it loose and crumbly.
  • Bake the oat bars for about 30 minutes or until the top is nicely golden. Remove the bars from the oven, allow them to cool, then cut into nine squares and serve.

Nutrition

Serving: 1square | Calories: 325kcal | Carbohydrates: 55g | Protein: 3g | Fat: 11g | Sodium: 168mg | Fiber: 2g

Overhead view of raspberry oatmeal bars cut into squares with ingredients on the sides

How to Make Raspberry Oatmeal Bars – Step by Step Photos

buttered square baking dish

Preheat the oven to 350ºF. Use about ½ tsp of butter to grease the inside of an 8×8-inch baking dish.

oats, sugar, and flour in a bowl

In a large bowl, combine 1 cup all-purpose flour, 1 cup rolled oats, ½ cup brown sugar, ¼ tsp baking soda, and ⅛ tsp salt. Stir until everything is very well combined.

Butter added to the bowl with the dry ingredients

Add 8 Tbsp butter (minus the ½ tsp used to butter the dish) to the bowl with the flour, oats, and sugar.

Butter mixed into the dry ingredients in the bowl

Work the butter into the flour and oats until the mixture looks a bit crumbly or damp. No large lumps of butter should remain.

Oat mixture pressed into the bottom of the baking dish

Pour half of the oat mixture into the baking dish, spread it out evenly, and then press it down until it is in a solid layer.

Jam spread out onto the oat mixture in the baking dish

Drop 1 cup raspberry jam (or your favorite flavor) onto the oat mixture, avoiding placing the jam right up against the baking dish (this makes it harder to remove the bars after baking). It helps if you stir the jam well first to break up any clumps, then you can drop small dollops onto the oat mixture to create a fairly even layer. Don’t try to spread the jam with a spoon or knife, as it will pull up the oat mixture.

Crumbled topping added on top of jam

Sprinkle the remaining oat mixture over top of the jam. Leave this layer loose, do not try to press it into a solid layer.

baked raspberry oat bars in the baking dish

Bake the raspberry oat bars in the preheated 350ºF oven for 30 minutes, or until the topping is nicely golden brown. Allow the bars to cool completely before cutting it into nine squares and serving. Running a knife around the edge to loosen any jam that may have baked onto the dish helps when removing the squares from the dish.

A pyramid of raspberry oatmeal bar squares with baking ingredients in the background

Enjoy the buttery, crumbly, oat goodness!

The post Raspberry Oatmeal Bars appeared first on Budget Bytes.

Apple Jelly

I was recently reunited with something I miss very much – a loaded apple tree! Friends of mine who had a house in the French countryside had a tree that, come fall, had so many apples, the limbs threatened to break off. Not wanting to be an accomplice in apple-cide, I decided to do my part to save the tree, and the apples, and make…

I was recently reunited with something I miss very much – a loaded apple tree! Friends of mine who had a house in the French countryside had a tree that, come fall, had so many apples, the limbs threatened to break off. Not wanting to be an accomplice in apple-cide, I decided to do my part to save the tree, and the apples, and make Apple Jelly.

Continue Reading Apple Jelly...

Peanut Butter and Jelly Bars

Peanut Butter and Jelly Bars are packed with two kinds of peanut butter and plenty of jam. These bars are a delicious way to turn a favorite childhood sandwich into dessert!  I don’t know what it is about this time of year, but it seems like every September, right around back-to-school time, I get a […]

The post Peanut Butter and Jelly Bars appeared first on My Baking Addiction.

Peanut Butter and Jelly Bars are packed with two kinds of peanut butter and plenty of jam. These bars are a delicious way to turn a favorite childhood sandwich into dessert! 

Four peanut butter and jelly bars scattered on a white plate next to a knife with peanut butter on the tip

I don’t know what it is about this time of year, but it seems like every September, right around back-to-school time, I get a serious craving for these peanut butter and jelly bars.

These bars are a tried and true Ina Garten recipe that I originally shared way back in the early years of my blog and I have made them countless times since then.

(more…)

The post Peanut Butter and Jelly Bars appeared first on My Baking Addiction.

Cherry Jam

One of the first “recipes” on this blog was No-Recipe Cherry Jam, posted in 2005. Why some hyperventilated about making something without an exact recipe, a lot of people successfully used those guidelines to make cherry jam over the last fifteen years. The basis for it was how I’ve been making jam forever; use 3 parts sugar to 4 parts fruit puree. The standard ratio…

One of the first “recipes” on this blog was No-Recipe Cherry Jam, posted in 2005. Why some hyperventilated about making something without an exact recipe, a lot of people successfully used those guidelines to make cherry jam over the last fifteen years. The basis for it was how I’ve been making jam forever; use 3 parts sugar to 4 parts fruit puree. The standard ratio is to use equal parts sugar to fruit puree but I like to use less.

 

When I scored a full flat of griottes (sour cherries) at the market last week, which are a rare find at the markets. They were well-priced (€10!), which made them even harder to resist bringing them home. Sour cherries don’t last long after they are picked; within 24 hours they’ll start losing their luster and need to be used. So I made cherry jam.

Continue Reading Cherry Jam...

Bubbly Jam Margaritas.

We very much need jam margaritas right now. I’m temporarily bringing back cocktail Thursdays so you can make the ultimate pantry drink this weekend: bubbly jam margaritas!  Oh yes. You can use any flavor of jam that you love – throw it in a shaker with some tequila and lime juice and here we are. […]

The post Bubbly Jam Margaritas. appeared first on How Sweet Eats.

We very much need jam margaritas right now.

These bubbly jam margaritas are easy and delicious! Use your favorite jam instead of simple syrup to create a fruity flavor everyone will love.

I’m temporarily bringing back cocktail Thursdays so you can make the ultimate pantry drink this weekend: bubbly jam margaritas! 

strawberry jam

Oh yes. You can use any flavor of jam that you love – throw it in a shaker with some tequila and lime juice and here we are.

In a very good place.

A very good, salted rim, frothy icy beverage type of place. 

P.S. if you’re in need of other quarantine cocktail ideas, I’ve done thirsty Thursdays here on the blog for yearsss… you have tons of options right here

These bubbly jam margaritas are easy and delicious! Use your favorite jam instead of simple syrup to create a fruity flavor everyone will love.

I’m also gearing up for cinco de mayo at home. I want to make tacos, maybe nachos and definitely a margarita next Tuesday. If you’re in the market for a fantastic margarita at home, aside from my favorite classic, here are my top five: 

Pink grapefruit margaritas

Blood orange margaritas

Watermelon rosé margaritas

Mojito margaritas

Coconut creamsicle margaritas

Don’t they all sound incredible? They are. I promise.

These bubbly jam margaritas are easy and delicious! Use your favorite jam instead of simple syrup to create a fruity flavor everyone will love.

Aside from that, I’ve only been having a cocktail on Friday night! Okay, maaaaybe Saturday. But I’ve made it a little tradition right now to have one on Friday evenings and it’s really nice. This is by far my newest favorite!

These bubbly jam margaritas are easy and delicious! Use your favorite jam instead of simple syrup to create a fruity flavor everyone will love.

So!

The best part about this? You don’t have to make a simple syrup. Simple syrup is ridiculously easy to make, and you can easily make a batch in advance and store it in the fridge, but it’s also just another step, you know?

However, instead of syrup, we’re doing the jam!

This isn’t the first time I’ve made a jam cocktail. Sixish years ago I made a cider jam bourbon cocktail and it inspired a ton of ideas using the jam. It’s the easiest way to make any fruity drink in an effortless manner. 

These bubbly jam margaritas are easy and delicious! Use your favorite jam instead of simple syrup to create a fruity flavor everyone will love.

The varieties I’ve tried so far for margaritas: strawberry, blackberry with jalapeños, apricot, peach and fig. It helps that I have a serious obsession with american spoon and buy at least 12 jams every summer when we are in Michigan. I should be making pitchers of margaritas with all of the jam I have! 

Once you shake everything up with ice, pour it into your salted rim glass, you add a liitttttle top off. I suggest going with a lime seltzer, but I won’t lie: I’ve tried prosecco too! It was delish. Because this entire cup is just wonderful.

Try try try!

These bubbly jam margaritas are easy and delicious! Use your favorite jam instead of simple syrup to create a fruity flavor everyone will love.

Bubbly Jam Margaritas

Print

Bubbly Jam Margaritas

These bubbly jam margaritas are easy and delicious! Use your favorite jam instead of simple syrup to create a fruity flavor everyone will love.
Course Drinks
Cuisine American
Prep Time 15 minutes
Total Time 15 minutes
Servings 1 cocktail, is easily multiplied
Author How Sweet Eats

Ingredients

  • coarse salt or tajin for the rim
  • 2 ounces lime juice
  • 2 ounces your favorite jam
  • 1 1/2 ounces tequila
  • 1 ounce orange liqueur, optional (like Grand Mariner or Triple Sec)
  • 1 ounce lime seltzer
  • lime wedges for garnish
  • optional add: sliced jalapeno peppers

Instructions

  • Rim a glass with a lime wedge and dip it in the salt. Fill the glass with ice.
  • Fill a shaker cup with ice. Add the lime juice, tequila, jam and orange liqueur (if you’re using it!). Shake for 30 seconds, until the drink is frothy. Pour it in the glass over ice. Top with the lime seltzer and garnish with lime wedges!
  • Jam ideas: strawberry, blackberry, apricot, orange, peach, fig, etc!

These bubbly jam margaritas are easy and delicious! Use your favorite jam instead of simple syrup to create a fruity flavor everyone will love.

Annnnd the rest of quarantine will look like this.

The post Bubbly Jam Margaritas. appeared first on How Sweet Eats.

Pink Grapefruit Marmalade

I’ve been making my own jams and marmalades for many years, so with apologies to those who’ve asked me which French jam to buy when they come to Paris, they’re often disappointed when I can’t guide them in the right direction. (Unless they want me to guide them to my jam-crowded kitchen cupboard.) Unless someone has given me a jar of theirs, I have so…

I’ve been making my own jams and marmalades for many years, so with apologies to those who’ve asked me which French jam to buy when they come to Paris, they’re often disappointed when I can’t guide them in the right direction. (Unless they want me to guide them to my jam-crowded kitchen cupboard.) Unless someone has given me a jar of theirs, I have so much on hand that, I can say without a hint of snobbery (but out of necessity) that I only eat my own. Romain is used to them, too, but when he tasted this Pink Grapefruit Marmalade, he put his morning coffee down to tell me that this was the best marmalade that he’s ever had.

Continue Reading Pink Grapefruit Marmalade...