Banana & Hazelnut Sharing Pancake

Thanks to Lyle’s Golden Syrup for sponsoring this post Every year I look forward to pancake day – it’s usually in close proximity to my birthday and they’re also one of my all-time favourite things to make! I love to change up the flavours and try different types of pancake from savoury, dinner-appropriate ones to luxuriously dessert-y options. This recipe is definitely a dessert-appropriate pancake – it makes a BIG fluffy one, like a cross between a souffle pancake and an American-style pancake, perfect for sharing between 2 for dessert (so perfect for Valentine’s day). To take things up a notch I caramelised some cut bananas in butter and Lyle’s golden syrup for a gooey sweetness which isn’t too overbearing. A handful of crushed hazelnuts stirred in with the bananas at the end adds a little crunch to each bite. Of course, I drizzled the pancake with a bit more Lyle’s Golden Syrup before serving as it’s an essential pancake topping! I also added a dollop of yoghurt (or you can go with whipped cream or even vanilla ice cream).

The post Banana & Hazelnut Sharing Pancake appeared first on Izy Hossack – Top With Cinnamon.

a large sharing pancake topped with caramelised bananas and yoghurt on a table setting with flowers

Thanks to Lyle’s Golden Syrup for sponsoring this post

Every year I look forward to pancake day – it’s usually in close proximity to my birthday and they’re also one of my all-time favourite things to make! I love to change up the flavours and try different types of pancake from savoury, dinner-appropriate ones to luxuriously dessert-y options.

a sharing pancake topped with caramelised bananas and hazelnuts

This recipe is definitely a dessert-appropriate pancake – it makes a BIG fluffy one, like a cross between a souffle pancake and an American-style pancake, perfect for sharing between 2 for dessert (so perfect for Valentine’s day). To take things up a notch I caramelised some cut bananas in butter and Lyle’s golden syrup for a gooey sweetness which isn’t too overbearing. A handful of crushed hazelnuts stirred in with the bananas at the end adds a little crunch to each bite.

Of course, I drizzled the pancake with a bit more Lyle’s Golden Syrup before serving as it’s an essential pancake topping! I also added a dollop of yoghurt (or you can go with whipped cream or even vanilla ice cream).

Banana & Hazelnut Sharing Pancake

Banana & Hazelnut Sharing Pancake

Yield: serves 2
Prep Time: 15 minutes
Cook Time: 15 minutes
Total Time: 30 minutes

A big fluffy pancake (for two!) topped with caramelised bananas and chopped hazelnuts, perfect for sharing.

Ingredients

Pancake batter:

  • 70g plain white flour
  • 1 tbsp granulated sugar
  • 3/4 tsp baking powder
  • 120ml milk
  • 2 eggs, separated
  • 15g (1 tbsp) butter, melted
  • Pinch fine table salt
  • 1 tbsp vegetable oil

Caramelised bananas:

  • 2 tbsp Lyle’s Golden Syrup, plus more for drizzling
  • 15g (1 tbsp) unsalted butter
  • 2 ripe bananas, peeled and halved lengthways or cut into rounds
  • 30g hazelnuts, crushed

Instructions

For the pancake:

  1. Place the flour, sugar, baking powder, milk and egg yolks into a bowl. Stir with a whisk to combine to a smooth batter. Melt the butter in a medium non-stick frying pan then remove from the heat and add to the bowl, stirring to combine.
  2. In a separate bowl whisk the egg whites with the salt until you get stiff peaks. Take 1/3 of the beaten whites and mix them into the batter. Add the remaining egg whites and fold in gently until combined.
  3. Heat the oil in the same frying pan you were using earlier over a medium-low heat. Pour in the pancake batter and cover with a lid. Leave to cook for around 5-6 minutes until the top of the pancake looks almost fully set and the bottom of the pancake is golden brown. Use a spatula to gently loosen the pancake from the pan and then flip over (I find using 2 metal spatulas to be the best way to do this). Cook until the other side is golden (1-2 minutes) then slide the pancake out onto a serving plate.

For the bananas:

  1. Heat the Lyle’s Golden Syrup and butter in the frying pan over a medium heat. Once melted, add the bananas cut side down to the pan and cook until softened and golden underneath. Stir in the hazelnuts and then pour the contents of the pan over the cooked pancake.
  2. Serve with a drizzle of Lyle’s Golden Syrup and a dollop of
    yoghurt or whipped cream if you’d like.



 









Have you made this recipe?
I’d love to see how it went! Tag me on instagram @izyhossack and hashtag it #topwithcinnamon so I can have a look & reshare in my stories!

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Vegan Maple Caramel Brownies

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Vegan Maple Caramel Brownies

Vegan Maple Caramel Brownies

Yield: 16
Prep Time: 20 minutes
Cook Time: 25 minutes
Total Time: 45 minutes

Ingredients

Maple caramel:

  • 100ml pure Canadian Maple Syrup (Amber Grade)
  • 50g tahini (or nut butter of your choice)
  • 60g vegan butter
  • pinch of salt

Brownie batter:

  • 120ml aquafaba (chickpea liquid)
  • 1/4 tsp cream of tartar (optional)
  • 220g caster sugar
  • 150g 70% chocolate
  • 100g vegan butter
  • 100g water
  • 100g plain white flour
  • 70g ground almonds
  • 50g unsweetened cocoa powder
  • 30g cornflour
  • 1/4 tsp bicarbonate of soda
  • 1/4 tsp fine table salt
  • Flaky salt, to sprinkle (optional)

Instructions

Make the maple caramel:

  1. Combine the maple syrup, tahini, vegan butter and salt in a small pot. Stir over a medium-low heat until the butter has melted then continue to cook until thickened – about 5 minutes.
  2. Pour the caramel into a bowl and set aside

Make the brownie batter:

  1. Preheat the oven to 180C fan and line an 8-inch square baking tin with baking paper.
  2. Whisk the aquafaba and cream of tartar (if using) in a stand mixer or a large bowl with electric beaters until it starts to become fluffy. Gradually add the caster sugar whilst whisking until all the sugar has been incorporated and the mixture is thick, glossy and looks like stiffly beaten egg whites.
  3. In the same pot you were using earlier, melt the chocolate and vegan butter over a low heat, stirring occasionally to prevent it catching. Lastly, stir in the water and remove from the heat.
  4. In a separate bowl mix the flour, almonds, cocoa powder, cornflour, bicarbonate of soda and salt.
  5. Pour the melted chocolate into the bowl of whisked aquafaba and sift in the flour mixture. Fold together until combined and pour into your prepared tin.    
  6. Take spoonfuls of the maple caramel and dot over the surface of the brownie batter.
  7. Bake for 25-30 minutes until the top looks dry but the centre is still soft. Remove from the oven, sprinkle with the salt and allow to cool completely before slicing into 16 squares.  
  8. Store in an airtight container for up to 1 week.



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Sticky Toffee Pudding for 2 (vegan)

Since London has moved into new restrictions for covid I’m not going home to my family so Christmas will be small with just me and my boyfriend. I wanted to come up with a dessert I could easily make to serve just the two of us for Christmas day. Most Christmas desserts are way too large to be a good option so I thought I’d small-batch a British classic – sticky toffee pudding!! The cake batter is easy to make (just two bowls and some utensils, no mixers or anything like that!). It includes soaked dates, of course, which I mash up with a fork instead of blending. This way you end up with small chunks of dates throughout the cake which adds a nice variation in flavour and texture. The dates are soaked in black tea (I just used a Yorkshire tea bag) but you can soak them in boiling water if you don’t have tea. To make two individual servings I baked the batter in a muffin tin, just filling two of the wells with batter. If you have little metal pudding basins, ramekins or even a couple of sturdy ceramic mugs, those will work too. The toffee […]

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vegan sticky toffee puddings for two, individual servings on plates drizzled with dairy free toffee sauce

Since London has moved into new restrictions for covid I’m not going home to my family so Christmas will be small with just me and my boyfriend. I wanted to come up with a dessert I could easily make to serve just the two of us for Christmas day. Most Christmas desserts are way too large to be a good option so I thought I’d small-batch a British classic – sticky toffee pudding!!

an individual serving of vegan sticky toffee pudding drizzled with toffee sauce and soy cream

The cake batter is easy to make (just two bowls and some utensils, no mixers or anything like that!). It includes soaked dates, of course, which I mash up with a fork instead of blending. This way you end up with small chunks of dates throughout the cake which adds a nice variation in flavour and texture. The dates are soaked in black tea (I just used a Yorkshire tea bag) but you can soak them in boiling water if you don’t have tea.

To make two individual servings I baked the batter in a muffin tin, just filling two of the wells with batter. If you have little metal pudding basins, ramekins or even a couple of sturdy ceramic mugs, those will work too.

The toffee sauce is very simple to make too, no thermometer needed, as it relies on dark brown sugar for that caramelised flavour rather than actual caramelisation of the sugar. I like to make it without treacle in the cake/sauce as I find it can be a bit too strong a flavour but feel free to swap out some of the sugar in the cake/sauce for a bit of treacle if you want that deeper flavour.

The hot toffee sauce is poured over the warm cakes before serving and, if you like, you can drizzle on a bit more soy cream (or add a scoop of non-dairy vanilla ice cream).

two servings of sticky toffee pudding with toffee sauce and soy cream with a bite taken.

Sticky toffee pudding without eggs or butter

As this is a vegan version, the cake uses oil to make it dairy-free and soaked oats to make it eggless! If you’d prefer to use eggs, you can switch the oats for 1/2 a beaten egg.

In the toffee sauce I used vegan butter (tub or block butter will work) and soy cream or oat cream. These are easy to switch for their non-vegan alternatives if you’d like.

Can it be made in advance?

Yes you can bake the cakes and make the sauce up to 2 days in advance. Just make sure you wrap the cakes up in a resealable bag and keep in an airtight container. Put the sauce into a lidded jar and keep in the fridge. Just reheat everything before serving (see below)

Can it be frozen?

Yes you can freeze the cakes as long as they’re cooled & wrapped tightly in a resealable bag. Let them defrost overnight at room temperature OR reheat in the oven at 180C for 15-20 minutes / microwave in 10 second bursts until warmed through.

How to reheat sticky toffee pudding:

For the cakes: unwrap the cakes and put onto a tray in the oven at 180C (350F) for 10 minutes (if fridge-cold) or 15-20 minutes (if frozen) or microwave in 10 second bursts until warmed through.

Sauce: Warm the sauce in a small pot on the stove (adding a little splash of water to loosen if needed) or remove the lid and microwave in 10 second bursts, stirring between bursts, until hot.

Sticky Toffee Pudding for 2 (vegan)

Sticky Toffee Pudding for 2 (vegan)

Yield: 2 servings
Prep Time: 20 minutes
Cook Time: 20 minutes
Total Time: 40 minutes

Ingredients

Cake:

  • 50g pitted dates (weigh after pitting them)
  • 100g boiling water
  • 1 English breakfast tea bag (optional)
  • 2 tbsp porridge oats
  • 50g plain white flour
  • 2 tbsp dark brown sugar (muscovado)
  • 1/4 tsp bicarbonate of soda
  • 1/2 tsp baking powder
  • pinch of salt
  • 2 tbsp vegetable oil

Toffee Sauce:

  • 20g vegan butter (block or tub)
  • 3 tbsp dark brown sugar
  • pinch of salt
  • 1/2 tsp vanilla
  • 4 tbsp soy cream or oat cream

Instructions

  1. Preheat the oven to 180C fan and grease two of the holes in a muffin tin with vegetable oil.
  2. Place the pitted dates, tea bag and oats into a small bowl. Pour over the boiling water and set aside for 10 minutes to soak. After they've soaked, remove the tea bag and use a fork to mash up the dates as much as you can.
  3. In a medium bowl mix the flour, sugar, bicarbonate of soda, baking powder and salt. Pour in the date mixture, oil and non-dairy milk. Stir to combine - don't overmix.
  4. Divide the batter between the two muffin holes - you should be able to fill them right to the top.
  5. Bake for 20-25 minutes until well-risen and, if you gently press the top of the muffins, they spring back.
  6. Gently loosen the cakes from the tin with a butter knife and tip them out onto a plate. Set aside.

For the toffee sauce (make this while the cake is baking):

  1. Combine the butter, sugar and salt in a small pot. Melt over a medium-low heat and, once fully melted, allow to bubble for 1 minute to melt the sugar. Next stir in the vanilla and cream then mix to combine and cook for a further 2-3 minutes until slightly thickened.

Serve:

  1. Place each warm cake onto a dessert plate. Pour over the warm toffee sauce (and extra cream if you like). Eat!


Notes

No muffin tin? Use ramekins, mini pudding basins or even sturdy ceramic mugs/small ceramic bowls instead

Make it non-vegan: use 1/2 an egg in place of the oats. Use dairy butter & cream in the toffee sauce.

Want to make it ahead? Wrap and chill for for to 2 days or freeze for up to 2 months. Put the sauce in a jar and store for up to 1 week in the fridge. For more detail see the post above.

Have you made this recipe?
I’d love to see how it went! Tag me on instagram @izyhossack and hashtag it #topwithcinnamon so I can have a look & reshare in my stories!

The post Sticky Toffee Pudding for 2 (vegan) appeared first on Izy Hossack - Top With Cinnamon.

Vegan Challah with Cranberries & Nuts

Lightly sweetened, super soft and fluffy – a vegan-ised version of challah bread! I used the tangzhong method (pre-cooking a bit of flour and water to form a paste) for the bread as it helps give the lightest texture to this bread without using eggs. The dough is quite a wet one which means that (a) you must knead it using the French fold method – slapping the dough down onto the counter and folding it over itself again and again (for about 10 minutes) until the dough is silky smooth. It’ll stick to the surface at first, leaving a residue, but will eventually become silky and cohesive. As the dough is so soft, I chill it overnight which makes it easier to handle the next day when shaping. It also improves the flavour giving the bread so it’s a win-win really. To incorporate the fruit and nuts, I divided the dough into thirds and rolled each one into a circle which I scattered the mix-ins over. The circle of dough was then rolled up into a snake, kind of like when you’re making cinnamon rolls, to form three long logs. I then plaited the logs together (just a 3 […]

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sliced vegan challah bread on a tray

Lightly sweetened, super soft and fluffy – a vegan-ised version of challah bread! I used the tangzhong method (pre-cooking a bit of flour and water to form a paste) for the bread as it helps give the lightest texture to this bread without using eggs.

The dough is quite a wet one which means that (a) you must knead it using the French fold method – slapping the dough down onto the counter and folding it over itself again and again (for about 10 minutes) until the dough is silky smooth. It’ll stick to the surface at first, leaving a residue, but will eventually become silky and cohesive.

As the dough is so soft, I chill it overnight which makes it easier to handle the next day when shaping. It also improves the flavour giving the bread so it’s a win-win really.

To incorporate the fruit and nuts, I divided the dough into thirds and rolled each one into a circle which I scattered the mix-ins over. The circle of dough was then rolled up into a snake, kind of like when you’re making cinnamon rolls, to form three long logs. I then plaited the logs together (just a 3 stranded plait to keep things simple).

This is the perfect kind of bread for snacking on OR, when it gets a bit stale, for turning into French toast!

close up of sliced vegan challah bread with cranberries, walnuts and almonds
Vegan Challah (with Cranberries & Nuts)

Vegan Challah (with Cranberries & Nuts)

Yield: 1 large loaf
Prep Time: 40 minutes
Cook Time: 35 minutes
Additional Time: 12 hours
Total Time: 13 hours 15 minutes

Ingredients

Tangzhong:

  • 20g plain white flour
  • 50g water

Dough:

  • 250g lukewarm water
  • 50g vegetable oil
  • 85g granulated sugar
  • 480g plain white flour
  • 1 tsp fine table salt
  • 2 tsp instant yeast
  • 50g Crazy Jack dried cranberries
  • 100g Crazy Jack walnut pieces

Topping:

  • 2 tbsp plant-based milk
  • 1 tbsp maple syrup
  • 3 tbsp Crazy Jack whole almonds, roughly chopped
  • 2 tbsp pearl sugar (optional)

Instructions

For the tangzhong

  1. Combine the tangzhong ingredients in a small pot, mixing until smooth. Place over a low heat and stir until super thick – about 3 minutes. Remove from the heat and pour in the lukewarm water, oil and sugar. Stir a bit to combine (the paste will still be chunky, this is fine).

For the dough:

  1. In a large bowl combine the 480g of plain white flour, the salt and yeast. Stir to combine. Pour the contents of the pot into the bowl and stir until no floury patches remain.
  2. Tip the dough out onto a lightly floured work surface. Knead by lifting the dough up and firmly slapping it down onto the work surface and folding the top half of the dough down over the bottom half (google the ‘French fold kneading method’ to see videos on how to do it). The dough will at first be very sticky and will leave residue on your worktop but as you knead it will become more smooth, cohesive and elastic. You can test the dough is ready by the windowpane test – pinch off a small piece of dough and stretch it as thin as possible with your fingers. It should be able to get thin enough to see light through it without breaking.
  3. Grease your mixing bowl with a bit of oil and transfer the kneaded to back into the bowl, flipping it to coat with oil. Cover the bowl (I use a clean bin bag secured at the edge with a chip clip) and place the bowl in the fridge overnight.
  4. Now is a good time to place the cranberries into a small bowl and cover with water – leave them at room temperature overnight so they can become juicy.

The next day:

  1. Tip the dough out onto a clean work surface dusted with flour. Divide into 3 portions and roll each portion into a ball.
  2. Roll each ball out into a ~40cm circle, dusting on top and underneath with flour as needed to prevent sticking. If the dough is resisting as you roll, just leave it to rest for 5 minutes and come back to it.
  3. Drain the cranberries and sprinkle a third of them over each dough circle. Sprinkle a third of the walnut pieces over each dough circle. Roll each circle up tightly (as you would with cinnamon rolls) to form 3 long snakes of dough. Line up the snakes of dough and pinch their top ends together firmly. Plait the strands and then pinch the bottom ends together firmly and tuck them under the loaf.
  4. Transfer the loaf to a baking tray lined with baking paper. Cover and leave to rise somewhere warm until almost doubled in volume – around 20-30 minutes. Meanwhile preheat the oven to 180°C fan.
  5. Combine the milk and maple syrup in a small bowl and brush gently all over the loaf with a pastry brush. Bake for 20 minutes then remove the loaf from the oven, brush again and then sprinkle with the chopped almonds and pearl sugar. Return to the oven for 10-15 minutes until deeply golden all over.
  6. Allow to cool completely before slicing and serving.

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Chocolate, Rye & Amaretto Yule Log

Thanks to Doves Farm for sponsoring this post Every year for Christmas I make the Christmas Day dessert and, for the past few years, I’ve ended up making some kind of yule log. It’s such a great cake to have for festive celebrations – there are so many flavour combos you can do with the cake, filling and glaze, and so many ways to decorate it. I stick with the same roll cake recipe from my mum’s family cookbook and just adapt it differently each time. This year I’ve made things a bit fancier & sophisticated by using Doves Farm Organic Wholemeal Rye Flour (available from Ocado, Sainsbury’s, Tesco and dovesfarm.co.uk) and a touch of cocoa in the sponge. The rye flour really helps to create the softest sponge and highlights the earthy nuttiness of the cocoa powder too. Doves Farm is the UK’s #1 organic flour brand (Kantar Worldpanel 52 w/e 21 April 2019) who produce a range of amazing flours, from traditional types like plain white and self-raising, to their ancient grains range which includes rye and spelt. To add extra layers of chocolatey-ness I included melted dark chocolate in the whipped cream filling which is also spiked […]

The post Chocolate, Rye & Amaretto Yule Log appeared first on Izy Hossack – Top With Cinnamon.

Thanks to Doves Farm for sponsoring this post

Every year for Christmas I make the Christmas Day dessert and, for the past few years, I’ve ended up making some kind of yule log. It’s such a great cake to have for festive celebrations – there are so many flavour combos you can do with the cake, filling and glaze, and so many ways to decorate it. I stick with the same roll cake recipe from my mum’s family cookbook and just adapt it differently each time.

This year I’ve made things a bit fancier & sophisticated by using Doves Farm Organic Wholemeal Rye Flour (available from Ocado, Sainsbury’s, Tesco and dovesfarm.co.uk) and a touch of cocoa in the sponge. The rye flour really helps to create the softest sponge and highlights the earthy nuttiness of the cocoa powder too. Doves Farm is the UK’s #1 organic flour brand (Kantar Worldpanel 52 w/e 21 April 2019) who produce a range of amazing flours, from traditional types like plain white and self-raising, to their ancient grains range which includes rye and spelt.

To add extra layers of chocolatey-ness I included melted dark chocolate in the whipped cream filling which is also spiked with Amaretto for that boozy hit. If you’re serving it to kids though, feel free to replace the alcohol with some brewed, cooled coffee with a touch of almond extract.

The most satisfying part about making this cake is the glaze – just a simple milk chocolate ganache – which you get to pour over the cake, enrobing it in a shiny, glistening coat. I decorated this with flaked almonds, some snowflake sprinkles and edible gold dust but a simpler option is to fork through the ganache (once set) in long streaks to give it a ‘tree bark’ texture and then dust lightly with icing sugar ‘snow’. It always looks so festive and fun when decorated like that I think!

Chocolate, Rye & Amaretto Yule Log

Chocolate, Rye & Amaretto Yule Log

Yield: serves 8
Prep Time: 20 minutes
Cook Time: 15 minutes
Additional Time: 40 minutes
Total Time: 1 hour 15 minutes

Ingredients

Filling:

  • 200ml double cream
  • 30g dark chocolate (70% cocoa), melted
  • 4 tbsp Amaretto

Ganache:

  • 100ml double cream
  • 100g milk chocolate, finely chopped

Instructions

  1. Preheat the oven to 180C fan. Grease a 9 x 13-inch baking tin (or baking tray with high sides) and line with a piece of baking paper. Set aside.
  2. In a large bowl whisk the eggs and sugar using electric beaters until pale, fluffy and tripled in volume.
  3. In a separate bowl, combine the rye flour, white flour, baking powder, salt and cocoa powder. Stir with a fork or whisk to remove any lumps. Add this all to the bowl of beaten eggs and fold together gently using a spatula until just combined.
  4. Pour the batter into the prepared tin and spread out gently into an even layer. Bake for 12-15 minutes until puffed and pale on top. Run a knife around the edges to loosen the cake from the tin as needed.
  5. Dust a clean tea towel with icing sugar and flip the cooked cake out onto it. Trim off the very edges of the cake (they’re crusty so don’t roll well) using a pair of scissors or a sharp knife. Gently peel away the baking paper then, starting at a short edge, roll the cake up with the tea towel (almost as if the tea towel is the filling of the cake). Leave the rolled cake seam side down to cool completely at room temperature.
  6. Once the cake has cooled, make the filling by whipping the cream until billowy but still forming soft peaks. Fold in the melted chocolate (make sure it has cooled a bit before folding in) followed by the amaretto.
  7. Make the ganache by heating the cream in a small pot until gently steaming. Place the chopped milk chocolate into a small heatproof bowl and pour the steaming cream over the top. Let sit for 5 minutes so the chocolate can melt then stir together until completely smooth. Set aside at room temperature so it can thicken slightly – you want it to be the texture of a thick glaze so it’s still pourable but not super runny.
  8. Carefully unroll the cooled cake and spread the filling all over the surface of the cake. Re-roll the cake and place onto a wire rack set over a baking tray.
  9. Pour the cooled ganache over the cake and leave so that the excess glaze drips off onto the tray below. Once the glaze has stopped dripping, use a metal spatula to transfer the cake to a serving platter. You can serve it now or chill for up to 24 hours before serving.

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10 Vegan Cookie Recipes – Free Ebook

To download, just fill in your details in the form below to subscribe to my newsletter and the ebook will be emailed to you immediately. Download the ebook * indicates required Email Address * First Name * Interests Baking Vegan recipes These plant-based recipes cover classics like Bourbon Biscuits and Chocolate Chip Shortbread to modern bakes like Vegan Brownie Cookies and Peanut Butter Crinkle Cookies. The recipes are small batch, perfect for 1-2 people, but can be doubled to make a standard batch which is ideal for edible gifts (especially if you bake a few types!). Be sure to check your spam folder or promotions tab of your email in case it’s in there! Recipes Featured in the Ebook Marbled Party Rings A crumbly, buttery biscuit ring dipped in marbled glaze. Simple and delicious with a cup of tea! Vegan Brownie Cookies No whisking needed! Just melt, stir, drop and bake for these fudgy brownie cookies made with aquafaba and dark chocolate. Vegan Custard Creams The classic biscuit to go with a cup of tea – two crunchy, patterned biscuits sandwiched together with a custard-flavoured buttercream. That nostalgic buttery vanilla flavour is sure to please! Vegan Bourbon Biscuits Despite the […]

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To download, just fill in your details in the form below to subscribe to my newsletter and the ebook will be emailed to you immediately.

Download the ebook

* indicates required
Interests

These plant-based recipes cover classics like Bourbon Biscuits and Chocolate Chip Shortbread to modern bakes like Vegan Brownie Cookies and Peanut Butter Crinkle Cookies.

The recipes are small batch, perfect for 1-2 people, but can be doubled to make a standard batch which is ideal for edible gifts (especially if you bake a few types!).

Be sure to check your spam folder or promotions tab of your email in case it’s in there!

Recipes Featured in the Ebook

Marbled Party Rings

A crumbly, buttery biscuit ring dipped in marbled glaze. Simple and delicious with a cup of tea!

Vegan Brownie Cookies

No whisking needed! Just melt, stir, drop and bake for these fudgy brownie cookies made with aquafaba and dark chocolate.

Vegan Custard Creams

The classic biscuit to go with a cup of tea – two crunchy, patterned biscuits sandwiched together with a custard-flavoured buttercream. That nostalgic buttery vanilla flavour is sure to please!

Vegan Bourbon Biscuits

Despite the name, these biscuits don’t contain alcohol! They’re simply two chocolate wafer cookies sandwiched with a simple chocolate buttercream. Not too sweet and perfect for dunking into a hot drink.

Crispy Chocolate Candy Cane Cookies

A buttery vanilla wafer cookie drizzled with bittersweet chocolate for a snappy finish. A sprinkle of crushed candy canes adds a pop of colour and that holiday flavour.

Vegan Amaretti with Chocolate Chips

The simplest cookies ever! No need to whisk any egg whites or aquafaba. Just mix all the ingredients, roll in powdered sugar and bake to get these soft and chewy almond cookies.

Vegan Oatmeal Cookies

One of my mum’s classic recipes, veganised! With chocolate chips and mixed nuts for texture (but really, whichever add-ins you want will work) and a hint of cinnamon.

Vegan Peanut Butter Crinkles

Chewy peanut butter cookies with soft centres and a crackly crust. These are the best kind! And so easy to make.

Orange, Olive oil & Sesame Cookies

Based off of an Italian cookie recipe from my mum’s nonna, these are the type of cookie you can eat by the handful with a cup of coffee for breakfast. Simple flavours, simple method and they keep well for up to a month.

Crunchy Chocolate Chip Shortbread

Have you had Maryland cookies or Chips Ahoy – the crunchy kind of chocolate chip cookie – and wanted to make them at home? Try these chocolate chip shortbread – they’re crumbly, buttery and crunchy. So so good!!!

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Mocha Caramel Cookies (vegan option)

Thanks to Pact coffee for sponsoring this post Around Christmas time I love baking cookies which bring me back to my childhood. One of my mum’s classics was a chocolate-cinnamon crinkle cookie, rolled in granulated sugar to give them a chewy crust and sparkly appearance. They’re almost like a chocolatey cousin of a ginger cookie in that sense, and the hint of cinnamon in there gives them that warm spiced flavour. I’ve used the recipe for that base dough here but made things extra special by cooking up a soft caramel infused with ground coffee beans (from Pact Coffee) which I stuffed into each cookie dough ball before baking. The result is an even chewier cookie with patches of coffee caramel layered within. Pact Coffee is a flexible coffee subscription service which champions high quality beans and treating farmers fairly (paying them 25-125% above Fairtrade rates!). As I have a coffee grinder (thanks to my incredibly generous neighbour who gave us one a few months ago), I opted to try their wholebean coffee. However, you can order whichever form of coffee you need, from different grinds to Nespresso-compatible pods. If you like a specific type of coffee you can also […]

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Thanks to Pact coffee for sponsoring this post

Around Christmas time I love baking cookies which bring me back to my childhood. One of my mum’s classics was a chocolate-cinnamon crinkle cookie, rolled in granulated sugar to give them a chewy crust and sparkly appearance. They’re almost like a chocolatey cousin of a ginger cookie in that sense, and the hint of cinnamon in there gives them that warm spiced flavour.

I’ve used the recipe for that base dough here but made things extra special by cooking up a soft caramel infused with ground coffee beans (from Pact Coffee) which I stuffed into each cookie dough ball before baking. The result is an even chewier cookie with patches of coffee caramel layered within.

Pact Coffee is a flexible coffee subscription service which champions high quality beans and treating farmers fairly (paying them 25-125% above Fairtrade rates!). As I have a coffee grinder (thanks to my incredibly generous neighbour who gave us one a few months ago), I opted to try their wholebean coffee. However, you can order whichever form of coffee you need, from different grinds to Nespresso-compatible pods. If you like a specific type of coffee you can also refine your search as you browse their site to filter by roast, flavour profile or origin. If, like me, you don’t really know *what* to look for, you can try out a coffee, give it a rating and, based off of that, they’ll select your next coffee.

If you want to give pact a go yourself, you can use my discount code of ‘IZY’ to get £5 off your first bag of coffee! (NB. I don’t get a kickback from this, it’s just for you to enjoy).

The coffee I used in the caramel was the Christmas blend, which has tasting notes of Christmas pudding (think cosy spices and molasses-y dried fruits). It was the perfect pairing for the bitterness of the cocoa and the warmth of the cinnamon. I have to say that the experience is made even better if you have a cup of the same coffee alongside the cookies so you really taste all the flavours!! The Christmas blend is available for a limited time and was created to support Mental Health Foundation, donating 50p from every bag sold to the charity. 

I hope you give the cookies (and coffee) a go and that they bring you a little bit of cosy comfort this winter!

Mocha Caramel Cookies

Mocha Caramel Cookies

Yield: 20 cookies
Prep Time: 20 minutes
Cook Time: 15 minutes
Additional Time: 30 minutes
Total Time: 1 hour 5 minutes

A chewy chocolate cookie, packed with chocolate chips and filled with a coffee caramel centre.

Ingredients

Caramel:

  • 75g granulated sugar
  • 20g golden syrup
  • 20g water
  • 75ml single cream (or soy cream)
  • 10g unsalted butter or vegan butter
  • 10g ground Pact Christmas Blend coffee beans

Cookie dough:

  • 110g unsalted butter or vegan butter, softened
  • 100g dark brown sugar
  • 50g granulated sugar
  • 1 tsp ground cinnamon
  • ½ tsp fine table salt
  • 4 tbsp aquafaba (or 1 egg)
  • 40g unsweetened cocoa powder
  • 80g golden syrup
  • 210g plain white flour
  • 1 ½ tsp bicarbonate of soda
  • 100g dark chocolate chips
  • ~50g granulated sugar, for rolling

Instructions

First make the caramel:

  1. Line a loaf tin with baking paper and set aside.
  2. Place the sugar, golden syrup and water into a medium pot and place over a medium heat on the stove. Stir only until the sugar dissolves then leave to bubble away – you want it to reach 116°C.
  3. Meanwhile, place the cream, butter and ground coffee beans into a small pot and bring to a simmer. Take off the heat and leave to infuse.
  4. Once the sugar mixture is up to temperature, strain the cream mixture through a fine mesh sieve to remove the majority of the coffee grounds. Add the cream to the hot caramel and stand back as it may bubble up.
    After the bubbles have subsided, mix together and put back on the heat. Bring the mixture up to 116°C again then remove from the heat and pour into the lined loaf tin. Leave to cool then freeze so the caramel sets up.

Make the cookie dough:

  1. Cream the butter and sugars together in a large bowl until smooth. Stir in the cinnamon, salt, aquafaba (or egg), cocoa powder and golden syrup. Lastly mix in the flour, bicarb and chocolate chips to get a soft dough.
  2. Chill the dough for at least 30 minutes or up to 24h to help it firm up.
  3. Once the dough has chilled, line two baking trays with baking paper and preheat the oven to 180C fan.
  4. Remove the caramel from the freezer and cut into 20 chunks.
  5. Scoop 2 tbsp worth of cookie dough and roll into a ball. Make an indent in the centre and pop the piece of caramel in there, squeezing the cookie dough around it to cover and seal the caramel within the dough. Repeat with all the cookie dough and caramel
  6. Place the 50g of granulated sugar into a shallow dish and roll each cookie dough ball lightly in the sugar. Set the cookie dough balls onto the baking trays spacing them about 6cm apart to allow for spread.
  7. Bake for 10-12 minutes until the edges are set but the centres are still soft. Leave to cool on the tray for 5 minutes before removing to a cooling rack.
  8. Store in an airtight container for up to 1 week.

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No-Knead Cinnamon-Pecan Babka

This recipe was created as part of a paid collaboration with Lyle’s Golden Syrup on Instagram but I’m posting it here too for ease of access! We all love a babka don’t we? So much more impressive looking than cinnamon rolls AND it’s sliceable (which means you can whack a slice under the grill until toasty and then cover it in butter). Whilst chocolate babka will always be my favourite kind I of course have an affinity to a cinnamony babka. It’s like a fancy cinnamon-swirl loaf! Perfect for turning into French toast when it gets a little bit stale and not too sweet overall. I added pecans to the filling since I always seem to find that they work well with cinnamon and brown sugar. This one is a no-knead boy which means that yes, you do need to make the dough the day before (I leave it for at least 10 hours in the fridge), but it also means that it makes the process seem more manageable since it’s broken up by that waiting period. The dough is one I adapted very slightly from the incredibly clever book by Zoe Francois, Holiday & Celebration Breads in 5 Minutes […]

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This recipe was created as part of a paid collaboration with Lyle’s Golden Syrup on Instagram but I’m posting it here too for ease of access!

We all love a babka don’t we? So much more impressive looking than cinnamon rolls AND it’s sliceable (which means you can whack a slice under the grill until toasty and then cover it in butter). Whilst chocolate babka will always be my favourite kind I of course have an affinity to a cinnamony babka. It’s like a fancy cinnamon-swirl loaf! Perfect for turning into French toast when it gets a little bit stale and not too sweet overall. I added pecans to the filling since I always seem to find that they work well with cinnamon and brown sugar.

cinnamon pecan babka on a plate

This one is a no-knead boy which means that yes, you do need to make the dough the day before (I leave it for at least 10 hours in the fridge), but it also means that it makes the process seem more manageable since it’s broken up by that waiting period. The dough is one I adapted very slightly from the incredibly clever book by Zoe Francois, Holiday & Celebration Breads in 5 Minutes a Day.

Soaking the baked loaf with a syrup made of diluted golden syrup is also key – the loaf really isn’t that sweet so the syrup does help to boost that but ALSO keeps the loaf moist and soft so don’t skip it!!

No-Knead Cinnamon-Pecan Babka

No-Knead Cinnamon-Pecan Babka

Yield: 1 (2lb) loaf
Prep Time: 30 minutes
Cook Time: 30 minutes
Additional Time: 12 hours
Total Time: 13 hours

Ingredients

Dough:

  • 100g lukewarm water
  • 1 tbsp Lyle’s golden syrup
  • 1 tsp easy-bake yeast
  • 1 medium egg
  • 45g vegetable oil
  • 250g white bread flour
  • ½ tsp fine table salt

Filling:

  • 50g unsalted butter, melted and cooled
  • 60g muscovado sugar
  • 30g Lyle’s golden syrup
  • 5g ground cinnamon
  • Pinch of salt
  • 75g pecans, roughly chopped

Syrup:

  • 50g Lyle’s golden syrup
  • 50g water

Instructions

For the dough:

  1. Place the water, golden syrup, yeast, egg and oil in a medium bowl and mix until combined. Add the flour and salt and stir together until the dough comes together and there are no floury patches remaining (it may be easier near the end of mixing to use your hands to knead it lightly in the bowl).
  2. Drizzle a little bit of vegetable oil on the dough and flip it over a couple of times so the dough is coated in oil. Cover the bowl (I like to use a small, clean bin bag, secured at the side with a food clip) and let rise in a warm place until doubled in volume – around 2 hours.
  3. Once risen, chill the dough overnight. This will do the ‘kneading’ for us and also makes the dough easier to handle when it’s time to shape.

For the filling:

  1. The next day, combine all of the filling ingredients except the pecans in a small bowl. Set aside.

Shape the babka:

  1. Lightly flour a work surface and tip the chilled dough out onto it. Dust with some more flour on top and roll out into a 25 x 30cm rectangle. Spread all of the filling over the surface of the dough and sprinkle with the chopped pecans.
  2. Starting at the long edge, roll the dough up tightly into a log. Pop onto a tray or plate and freeze for 15 minutes – this will keep things neat and easy for the next step.
  3. Remove the dough log from the freezer and cut down the length of the log so you end up with two long strips. Place the cut sides facing up and twist the lengths over each other a few times, pinching the ends to seal.
  4. Carefully transfer the shaped dough to a lined 2lb loaf pan, cover, and leave to rise in a warm place for 45 minutes-1 hour, or until almost doubled in volume.
  5. Around 10 minutes before your dough is ready, preheat the oven to 180C fan. Uncover the babka and bake for 25-35 minutes. It’ll be done when a skewer inserted into the centre comes out with no dough attached.

For the syrup:

  1. As the babka is baking, warm the golden syrup and water in a small pot just until it starts to gently bubble.
  2. Pour the warm syrup over the hot babka and leave it to soak in and cool before slicing and serving.

Have you made this recipe?
I’d love to see how it went! Tag me on instagram @izyhossack and hashtag it #topwithcinnamon so I can have a look & reshare in my stories!

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Pumpkin Marshmallows

The shorter, colder days now mean that it’s hot chocolate season!! And that means – marshmallows. Since it’s also probably going to be a edible gift care package holiday for 2020, marshmallows are a great one to make. They last well in an airtight container and aren’t fragile so they work perfectly for mailing. Whilst I’ve done a few different types of marshmallow in the past, haven’t ever tried using a vegetable puree in the base. For these ones, I replaced the water in my usual marshmallow base with canned pumpkin puree and it worked like a dream! I spiced these up with cinnamon, ground ginger, nutmeg and clove for that cosy, Christmassy flavour. I use golden syrup & brown sugar in the syrup for extra flavour as I find if you just use white sugar & glucose syrup, you don’t get that slightly caramel-like edge to the marshmallows. For an even deeper flavour, you can also replace 1/4 of the golden syrup with treacle which boosts that molasses hit. (This recipe was made for a paid instagram collaboration with Lyle’s Golden Syrup & I’ve decided to share the recipe on here too)

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toasted pumpkin marshmallows on a tray

The shorter, colder days now mean that it’s hot chocolate season!! And that means – marshmallows. Since it’s also probably going to be a edible gift care package holiday for 2020, marshmallows are a great one to make. They last well in an airtight container and aren’t fragile so they work perfectly for mailing.

Whilst I’ve done a few different types of marshmallow in the past, haven’t ever tried using a vegetable puree in the base. For these ones, I replaced the water in my usual marshmallow base with canned pumpkin puree and it worked like a dream! I spiced these up with cinnamon, ground ginger, nutmeg and clove for that cosy, Christmassy flavour.

pumpkin marshmallows on a tray with jars of marshmallows behind

I use golden syrup & brown sugar in the syrup for extra flavour as I find if you just use white sugar & glucose syrup, you don’t get that slightly caramel-like edge to the marshmallows. For an even deeper flavour, you can also replace 1/4 of the golden syrup with treacle which boosts that molasses hit.

(This recipe was made for a paid instagram collaboration with Lyle’s Golden Syrup & I’ve decided to share the recipe on here too)

a mug of hot chocolate with pumpkin marshmallows

Pumpkin Marshmallows

Pumpkin Marshmallows

Yield: 36

Fluffy pumpkin spice marshmallows, a delicious edible gift & great for hot chocolate!

Ingredients

  • 125g granulated sugar
  • 125g dark brown sugar
  • 210g Lyle’s Golden Syrup
  • 100g water
  • Pinch of salt
  • 125g pumpkin puree
  • 1 tbsp + 2 tsp (15g) powdered gelatine
  • 1 tsp ground cinnamon
  • 1/2 tsp ground ginger
  • 1/4 tsp freshly grated nutmeg
  • 1/8 tsp ground cloves
  • Icing sugar + Cornflour, for dusting

Instructions

  1. Grease an 8 x 8-inch square baking tin with vegetable oil
    and line with a sling of baking paper. Grease the baking paper with a layer of
    oil too then set aside.
  2. Combine the sugars, syrup, water and salt in a large pot and place on the stove over a medium heat. Leave to cook, stirring occasionally, until the mixture reaches 116°C. If it looks like it’s going to boil over at any point just reduce the heat and the bubbles should subside.
  3. Meanwhile, place the pumpkin puree into the bowl of a stand mixer with the whisk attachment fitted (or a large heatproof bowl if using a handheld electric whisk).  Sprinkle over the powdered gelatine and add all of the spices. Stir together to form a thick paste then set aside.
  4. Once the sugar mixture has reached 116°C, remove it from the heat. Start the stand mixer on a low speed (or start your electric beaters on the slowest setting) and slowly start to pour in the hot syrup, being careful to pour it down the side of the bowl rather than onto the whisk. Once all the syrup is in the bowl, increase the speed to high and whisk until very thick, pale and fluffy.
  5. Working quickly, pour and scrape the marshmallow mixture into the tin you prepared earlier, spreading it out into an even layer. Leave to set for at least 3 hours, or preferably overnight.
  6. To cut the marshmallows, combine equal volumes of cornflour and icing sugar in a small bowl. Dust the top of the marshmallows with this mixture using a sieve. Flip the marshmallows out onto a clean work surface (or a large piece of baking paper) and peel away the greased layer of baking paper from the underside. Dust with more of the cornflour mixture. Use a large, sharp knife to cut the marshmallows – brush the knife with vegetable oil and dust with cornflour mixture to help prevent the marshmallows from sticking to the knife.
  7. Roll each cut marshmallow in more cornflour mixture to ensure all sides are coated. You can toss the marshmallows, a few at a time, into a clean sieve and shake to remove excess cornflour coating. Store the marshmallows in an airtight container for up to 1 month.



Have you made this recipe?
I’d love to see how it went! Tag me on instagram @izyhossack and hashtag it #topwithcinnamon so I can have a look & reshare in my stories!

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Easy Scones – Baking Basics

A classic scone is the perfect tea-time snack, served with clotted cream (or salted butter, as I prefer!) and jam. These little delights are a kind of quickbread (similar to soda bread) so rely on a chemical raising agent, not yeast, and come together extremely quickly. From Mary Berry to the BBC, every scone recipe will vary slightly but the ratios are usually pretty similar and rely on the simple ingredients of plain flour, milk, butter and baking powder. You can play around with add-ins as well, folding in grated cheddar cheese for a cheese scone or some soaked sultanas for a fruit scone. I like the addition of eggs to my scone dough as I think they produce a cakier texture and help the scones stay softer for longer. Some people like using buttermilk but, as it is often hard to find, I prefer to simply thin some natural yoghurt with water (in a 50:50 ratio) to use instead of milk sometimes. Can scones be frozen? Yes, this is a great way to make scones way in advance. Freeze the cut rounds of scone dough on a lined baking tray. Once frozen, slide the scone dough rounds into a […]

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a classic scone, halved and filled with strawberry jam and clotted cream

A classic scone is the perfect tea-time snack, served with clotted cream (or salted butter, as I prefer!) and jam. These little delights are a kind of quickbread (similar to soda bread) so rely on a chemical raising agent, not yeast, and come together extremely quickly. From Mary Berry to the BBC, every scone recipe will vary slightly but the ratios are usually pretty similar and rely on the simple ingredients of plain flour, milk, butter and baking powder. You can play around with add-ins as well, folding in grated cheddar cheese for a cheese scone or some soaked sultanas for a fruit scone. I like the addition of eggs to my scone dough as I think they produce a cakier texture and help the scones stay softer for longer. Some people like using buttermilk but, as it is often hard to find, I prefer to simply thin some natural yoghurt with water (in a 50:50 ratio) to use instead of milk sometimes.

classic scones with clotted cream and strawberry jam and a cup of tea

Can scones be frozen?

Yes, this is a great way to make scones way in advance. Freeze the cut rounds of scone dough on a lined baking tray. Once frozen, slide the scone dough rounds into a resealable food bag and freeze for up to 3 months. You can bake the dough straight from frozen, at the usual temperature, for 20-25 minutes.

You can also freeze already baked scones in a resealable food bag for up to 1 month. Pop them into a 100C (200F) oven for about 20 minutes to defrost & warm them up.

Can scone dough be made in advance & refrigerated?

Yes, you can make scone dough the night before you want to bake them. I think this works best if you roll & cut out the scones, pop them onto a lined baking tray and then chill for up to 24 hours (instead of chilling the un-cut dough). You can then glaze and bake as usual straight from the fridge – the chilling shouldn’t really impact the baking time much. This can actually provide a better rise to your scones as the flour has more time to absorb the liquid in the dough, plus the buttery bits in the dough re-solidify, which both help produce a better texture. Don’t leave the scone dough in the fridge for more than 24h though as the baking powder will start to lose its efficacy meaning your scones won’t rise as much!

Why is scone dough so wet?

The texture of scone dough should be quite wet and sticky as this loose texture really helps to produce the lightest, fluffiest texture once baked. The drier your dough is, the less ability the dough has to rise in the oven and the denser your scones will be. If you’re finding the scone dough is too wet to handle, pop it in the fridge to chill for about 30 to 60 minutes. Make sure you’re using a lightly floured work surface and dust the top of the dough lightly with flour. Also, try to handle it as little as possible to prevent it sticking! Do not try to mix more flour into the dough as you’ll throw off the ratios of ingredients in the recipe resulting in dry, dense scones.

Tips for the best scones

  1. Scone dough is not kneaded – instead it is gently stirred and then patted and folded in half a few times (this is called ‘chaffing’ the dough), trying to work it only until the dry ingredients are incorporated. This is because kneading the dough will develop the gluten structure in the dough past where we want it to be, which leads to a tough, dense scone. On the other hand, chaffing the dough incorporates some air into the dough and encourages formation of distinct layers which help the dough rise AND give a natural ‘fault’ line to your scone meaning you should be able to split it in half by simply pulling the top and bottom apart.
  2. Only stir the batter together until the liquid is just about incorporated – the chaffing step after mixing is where the dough properly comes together so don’t worry if it looks like a complete mess when you tip it out of the bowl. By finishing the mixing job when you’re folding the dough on the work surface, you prevent overworking the dough and ensure you get nice flaky layers in your scones.
  3. Re-roll the dough as few times as possible – you will need to re-roll the scraps if you’re cutting out circles but try your best to do this only 2 or 3 times max. This will ensure you don’t overwork your dough!
  4. Have cold butter and milk – this will help give the scones a light and ‘short’ (crumbly) texture as the cold fat and milk will somewhat inhibit gluten development.
  5. Roll the dough THICK – I like to cut my scones from dough which is about 3cm thick. You’ll probably look at the dough and think ‘that dough is too thick!!’ but it’s not!! It’s probably the most vital part to ensuring your scones rise up tall.
  6. Don’t twist the cutter – when you punch each circle out of the dough, use a straight down & up motion, no twisting!! The twisting effectively seals the cut edges of the circle which means it won’t rise as well.
  7. Don’t let the egg/milk glaze drip down the sides of the scone – again this kind of seals that cut edge of the scone and will prevent it rising.

Can I make these scones with self-raising flour?

Yes, just replace the plain flour and the baking powder in the recipe with 360g of self-raising flour

Can I make these scones without egg?

Yes, they’ll have a slightly less spongey texture but you can replace the eggs in the recipe with an extra 75ml (1/4 cup plus 1 tbsp) of milk.

Easy Scones

Easy Scones

Yield: 8 to 9 scones
Prep Time: 15 minutes
Cook Time: 15 minutes
Total Time: 30 minutes

Big, fluffy scones made with plain flour, milk, butter & eggs. Delicious served with strawberry jam and clotted cream.

Ingredients

  • 360g (3 cups) plain flour (all-purpose flour)*
  • 50g (1/4 cup) granulated sugar
  • 3 1/2 tsp baking powder
  • 1/2 tsp fine table salt
  • 100g (7 tbsp) unsalted butter, cold, cubed
  • 2 medium eggs
  • 100ml (1/3 cup + 1 tbsp) cold milk*

Glaze (optional):

  • 1 egg, beaten OR 2 tbsp milk

Instructions

  1. Preheat the oven to 200°C fan (400°F fan) / 220°C non-fan (430°F non-fan). Line a baking tray with baking paper.
  2. Place the flour, sugar, baking powder and salt in a large bowl. Stir together. Add the cubed butter and used your fingertips to rub the butter into the dry ingredients until the mixture looks kind of sandy and shaggy with some pea-sized lumps of butter remaining.
  3. Make a well in the middle of the flour mixture. Crack the eggs into the centre and pour in the milk. Stir together very briefly to form a messy, sticky dough with some floury patches remaining.
  4. Tip the contents of the bowl out onto a work surface dusted lightly with flour. Pat the shaggy dough out into a rough rectangle about 1.5cm (1/2-inch) thick. Fold the dough in half and rotate 90 degrees. Pat out again and fold in half then rotate 90 degrees. Do this a couple more times until there are no floury patches remaining. You want to work quickly & lightly here - don't overwork the dough or the scones will be tough.
  5. Now dust your dough rectangle with flour on top and underneath. Roll out gently until it's around 3cm thick - it'll look super thick but this is key to getting tall scones!
  6. Dust a 5 or 6cm (2 or 2.5-inch) round cutter (or water glass) with flour and use to cut out rounds of dough. Make sure you're using a simple down-up movement with the cutter (i.e. DON'T twist the cutter as this will seal the cut edge and prevent the scones rising).
  7. Pop the rounds out onto the lined tray. Gently gather the scraps and re-roll, cutting out more rounds from the dough until it's all used up. You should get 8 or 9 scones total.
  8. Brush the tops of the scones with a thin layer of beaten egg (or milk) - try to make sure the glaze doesn't drip down the sides of the scone as this can prevent them rising.
  9. Bake for 12-15 minutes, rotating the tray 180-degrees when they're halfway through their cooking time. They should be well-risen and golden all over.
  10. Serve warm with clotted cream, or butter, and jam.

Notes

*Using self-raising flour: If you don't have baking powder to hand, just replace the plain flour & baking powder with 360g (3 cups) of self-raising flour.

*Using yoghurt in place of milk: I sometimes use a mixture of water and natural yoghurt (50ml of each) in place of milk. It depends on what I have in the fridge and what flavour I'm going for (yoghurt adds a bit more of a tangy flavour to the scones).

Dairy-Free Scones - use a dairy free block butter (like Stork or Naturli) instead of the butter. Use a dairy-free milk (I like oat milk).

Freezing scones before baking - you can freeze the rounds of scone dough before baking on a tray. Once frozen, slide them off the tray into a sandwich bag and pop back into the freezer for up to 3 months. They can be baked from frozen at the same temperature as usual for 20-25 minutes.

Freezing baked scones - cool scones to room temperature then pop into a sandwich bag and freeze for up to 1 month.

Have you made this recipe?
I’d love to see how it went! Tag me on instagram @izyhossack and hashtag it #topwithcinnamon so I can have a look & reshare in my stories!

The post Easy Scones – Baking Basics appeared first on Izy Hossack - Top With Cinnamon.