How to Make Roasted Pumpkin Seeds

I’m a little late on this tutorial this year, but we finally got around to carving our pumpkins this past weekend! Carving pumpkins is fun, but roasting the pumpkin seeds is by far my favorite part. Roasted pumpkin seeds are so crunchy, delicious, and addictive, and I look forward to them every year!

The post How to Make Roasted Pumpkin Seeds appeared first on Budget Bytes.

We finally got around to carving our pumpkins last weekend, so I got to make my favorite fall treat! Carving pumpkins is fun, but the roasted pumpkin seeds are by far my favorite part. Roasted pumpkin seeds are so crunchy, delicious, and addictive, and I look forward to them every year!

And if you’ve already discarded your pumpkin seeds from this year, don’t worry! You can use this same technique for the seeds from other winter squash, like acorn, delicata, butternut, and spaghetti squash. So as you enjoy your seasonal squash over the next few months, make sure to enjoy the seeds as well!

roasted pumpkin seeds on a baking sheet with pumpkins on the side

Can You Eat the Shell?

You may be familiar with pepitas, which are the tender green inner portion of the pumpkin seed. When you remove the pumpkin seeds from the pumpkin, they still have their outer white shell (or hull). While this outer shell is very tough and fibrous, it is edible. It takes a bit of chewing, so if you have difficulty chewing or a delicate stomach, you may want to pass on roasted pumpkin seeds.

What Do Roasted Pumpkin Seeds Taste Like?

Roasted pumpkin seeds have a deliciously nutty flavor and aroma that is kind of similar to fresh popcorn. The flavor is fairly neutral and pairs well with both sweet and savory spices.

How to Flavor Roasted Pumpkin Seeds

The fun thing about roasted pumpkin seeds is that you can flavor them with just about anything you like! I used some Cajun seasoning salt in the recipe below because it’s an easy one-stop-shop for salting and seasoning, but you have so many options. Here are some other great ideas for seasoning your roasted pumpkin seeds:

  • Curry powder
  • Garlic Herb Seasoning
  • Taco Seasoning
  • Ranch seasoning (if this contains buttermilk powder, toss the seeds in melted butter and the seasoning after roasting)
  • Cinnamon and sugar (toss seeds in melted butter, cinnamon, and sugar after roasting)
  • Salt and freshly cracked pepper
  • Italian seasoning

Make sure to check to see if your seasoning blend contains salt. If it does not contain salt, you will want to add salt in addition to the spice blend.

How to Store Roasted Pumpkin Seeds

After roasting the pumpkin seeds, allow them to cool completely to room temperature. Keep the cooled pumpkin seeds in an air-tight container at room temperature for 2-3 weeks. No need to refrigerate, unless they’ve been tossed in butter after roasting.

Roasted pumpkin seeds in a small black ceramic bowl with pumpkins and leaves on the sides
Roasted pumpkin seeds in a small black ceramic bowl with pumpkins and leaves on the sides

Roasted Pumpkin Seeds

Roasted pumpkin seeds are an easy and deliciously crunchy byproduct of pumpkin carving. A fast, easy, and tasty fall treat!
Prep Time 10 minutes
Cook Time 25 minutes
Total Time 35 minutes
Servings 10 ¼ cup each
Calories 78kcal
Author Beth – Budget Bytes

Ingredients

Instructions

  • Preheat the oven to 350ºF. Rinse the pumpkin seeds in a colander and remove any remaining pumpkin flesh that may be attached to the seeds. Place the washed pumpkin seeds in a lint-free dishcloth and pat dry (the seeds have a slippery coating and may not feel totally dry).
  • Place the washed and dried pumpkin seeds in a bowl and add the cooking oil and seasoning. Stir until the seeds are well coated. Pour the seasoned pumpkin seeds out onto a baking sheet lined with parchment paper, and spread them into a single layer.
  • Roast the pumpkin seeds in the preheated oven, stirring every 5-10 minutes, until they are golden brown and have a nutty aroma. Total roasting time will vary depending on the size of the seeds and their moisture level. Allow the pumpkin seeds to cool, then enjoy!

Notes

*Use your favorite high heat cooking oil and your favorite seasoning blend (see notes above recipe for seasoning ideas).

Nutrition

Serving: 0.25cup | Calories: 78kcal | Carbohydrates: 1.69g | Protein: 3.43g | Fat: 7.05g | Sodium: 138.07mg | Fiber: 0.75g

How to Make Roasted Pumpkin Seeds – Step by Step Photos

Pumpkin seeds straight out of the pumpkin

Preheat the oven to 350ºF. This is what your pumpkin seeds will probably look like right after they’re scraped out of your pumpkin. The extra bits of pumpkin are a lot easier to separate from the seeds while they’re in water, so let’s give them a rinse first.

Rinsed pumpkin seeds

Place the pumpkin seeds in a colander and rinse with cool water. Remove the extra bits of pumpkin flesh as you rinse the seeds. Let them drain well then place them in a lint-free towel and pat dry. This helps them get really crispy. The seeds do have a sort of slippery coating, so they may not feel 100% dry.

Season pumpkin seeds

After cleaning and drying, I had about 2.5 cups of pumpkin seeds (from two pumpkins). Place the seeds in a bowl and add your seasoning. I’m using a Cajun seasoning that contains a lot of salt, so I only needed to add the one ingredient (1 tsp). Use your favorite seasoning and don’t forget to make sure it has some salt, or add some separately.

Raw pumpkin seeds on a baking sheet

Spread the seasoned pumpkin seeds out onto a baking sheet lined with parchment paper. Transfer to the preheated 350ºF oven.

Roasted pumpkin seeds on a baking sheet

Roast the pumpkin seeds in the oven for about 25 minutes, stirring every 5-10 minutes (I stirred at 10 minutes, and 20 minutes, then roasted for a final 5 minutes). The total roasting time will vary depending on the size of your pumpkin seeds and their moisture content. You’ll know they’re done when they are golden brown and smell nutty, kind of like popcorn.

Roasted pumpkin seeds on a baking sheet

Allow the pumpkin seeds to cool, then enjoy! Or store in an air-tight container for 2-3 weeks.

The post How to Make Roasted Pumpkin Seeds appeared first on Budget Bytes.

Sourdough Pumpkin Bread (Vegan)

Having recently revived my sourdough starter, my collection of sourdough discard has started up again. Since it’s the spooky season (a.k.a October), it only felt appropriate to make a vegan pumpkin bread version of my sourdough banana bread!! Usi…

Having recently revived my sourdough starter, my collection of sourdough discard has started up again. Since it’s the spooky season (a.k.a October), it only felt appropriate to make a vegan pumpkin bread version of my sourdough banana bread!! Using homemade pumpkin puree I had planned on doing this a few weeks ago but found I …

Sourdough Pumpkin Bread (Vegan) Read More »

The post Sourdough Pumpkin Bread (Vegan) appeared first on Izy Hossack - Top With Cinnamon.

How to Roast Pumpkin Seeds (with 3 Recipes!)

How to Roast Pumpkin Seeds (with 3 Recipes!)
If you’re carving pumpkins, save those seeds that get scraped out and make these delicious crunchy roasted pumpkin seeds. This is an easy, basic method with three seasoning recipes included… use any of the…

How to Roast Pumpkin Seeds (with 3 Recipes!)

If you're carving pumpkins, save those seeds that get scraped out and make these delicious crunchy roasted pumpkin seeds. This is an easy, basic method with three seasoning recipes included... use any of them of your favorite combination of spices! An awesome fall treat!

READ: How to Roast Pumpkin Seeds (with 3 Recipes!)

Poilane’s Corn Flour Bread

At some point, we’re all going to have to decide on the same measuring system. Maybe we can make it our New Year’s resolution? Most of the world is using the metric system while a few holdouts, namely the United States, Liberia, and Burma, are sticking with other systems of measurement. For the record, I know some very good bakers that use cups and tablespoons,…

At some point, we’re all going to have to decide on the same measuring system. Maybe we can make it our New Year’s resolution? Most of the world is using the metric system while a few holdouts, namely the United States, Liberia, and Burma, are sticking with other systems of measurement. For the record, I know some very good bakers that use cups and tablespoons, and I like them as well.

Anyone who says they aren’t accurate hasn’t encountered a French recipe that calls for un verre de vin de lait (a “wine glass” of milk), a cullière à soupe (a soup spoon) of baking powder, or trois feuilles de gélatine, when every sheet of gelatin I’ve come across is either a different size, weight, or strength. And my wine glasses come in a lot of different sizes, too, although I always seem to reach for the largest ones…but not necessarily for baking.

Although books have been written on the subject, my take is that most Americans like holding measuring spoons and cups. It’s more tactile and visceral, kind of like how many of us holdouts don’t want to make dinner in a machine that will make it for us.

Many of us have fond memories of measuring cups, having seen our parents and grandparents using them, and having them handed down to us, but for recipe writers, metrics really are the way to go. The accuracy issue aside, it’s easy to cut a recipe down, say, 20%, which comes in handy when you’re testing a recipe but find that if you could somehow resize the batter down by 20-percent, it’d fit perfectly in a standard cake pan. Otherwise, you’re stuck telling people to use 3/4 cup plus 1 tablespoon of milk, or the 3 tablespoons plus 1/4 teaspoon of heavy cream I saw in a European cookbook that had been translated into English. I don’t know about you, but I’m not measuring out 1/4 teaspoon of cream to make a batch of ice cream.

Continue Reading Poilane’s Corn Flour Bread...

Multigrain and Seed Biscotti

I was browsing some older cookbooks recently. There are so many really great new cookbooks that come out every season that it’s easy to forget some of the beloved ones waiting patiently on our shelves, for us to return to them. Before electronics came on the scene, I used to curl up every night under the cover with an actual book or two, before dozing…

I was browsing some older cookbooks recently. There are so many really great new cookbooks that come out every season that it’s easy to forget some of the beloved ones waiting patiently on our shelves, for us to return to them. Before electronics came on the scene, I used to curl up every night under the cover with an actual book or two, before dozing off to bed.

The downside was that I always ended up bookmarking recipes that I wanted to make, and I’d get excited, and start running up and down (in back and forth) in my mind, about how I’m going to gather the ingredients when I wake up the next morning. Recently one that I came across was a recipe for Multigrain Biscotti in a cookbook from the ’90s that had nearly two dozen ingredients in it. But they sounded so good, I made a little (okay…not-so-little) shopping list, for the next day, using that list as a bookmark, planning to make them the next day.

Continue Reading Multigrain and Seed Biscotti...

Sweet Potato Chowder.

 This sweet potato chowder is a huge hug in a bowl for you!  Because… Monday. Yes yes. We all need a hug today.  Just LOOK AT THIS BOWL. I want to devour every last bite.  This soup is super comforting and hearty. It’s so warming and flavorful, it’s ridiculous! It’s a soup that can easily […]

The post Sweet Potato Chowder. appeared first on How Sweet Eats.

 This sweet potato chowder is a huge hug in a bowl for you! 

This sweet potato chowder is a hug in a bowl! Made with lots of greens and crunchy pancetta and pepitas for topping, it's a perfect weeknight meal.

Because… Monday. Yes yes. We all need a hug today. 

This sweet potato chowder is a hug in a bowl! Made with lots of greens and crunchy pancetta and pepitas for topping, it's a perfect weeknight meal.

Just LOOK AT THIS BOWL. I want to devour every last bite. 

This soup is super comforting and hearty. It’s so warming and flavorful, it’s ridiculous! It’s a soup that can easily be a meal, no salad or bread needed. Of course those are welcome additions and if you feel like pairing with some beer bread or a house salad, I don’t blame you.

This sweet potato chowder is a hug in a bowl! Made with lots of greens and crunchy pancetta and pepitas for topping, it's a perfect weeknight meal.

The whole pot starts off with some pancetta that we crisp up, then reserve for topping later. If you don’t eat meat, you can easily skip this part and use olive oil (or your oil of choice) to start everything off. The pancetta adds a lot of flavor and the crunch that I need on top. 

This sweet potato chowder is a hug in a bowl! Made with lots of greens and crunchy pancetta and pepitas for topping, it's a perfect weeknight meal.

The crunchy bits are what make it SO good. I’m never one to turn down a potato soup. I have a classic loaded potato soup recipe, as well as a loaded sweet potato soup too!

While they are both major comfort food, I always find that they need some texture on top. 

Or should I say… that I need some texture on top. 

Of course I do.

High maintenance for life!

My favorite way to add texture on top is the pancetta and a sprinkling of roasted, salted pepitas. So crunchy! So tasty! And so satisfying.

p.s.I actually loathe the word “tasty” but sometimes no other one will do. It’s a vibe. 

This sweet potato chowder is a hug in a bowl! Made with lots of greens and crunchy pancetta and pepitas for topping, it's a perfect weeknight meal.

After the soup simmers for a while, we’re going to toss in some tuscan kale too. I LOVE THIS. Getting in some greens, but in a warm bowl of comfort food, you know? I like to stir the greens in a few minutes before eating, because the kale holds a little crunch. It will soften by the next day for leftovers but it’s still super good.

Finally I stir in some milk or cream or even coconut cream. A little goes a long way and it makes the soup richer, more satisfying and overall more comforting. It’s not as brothy or thin and makes it FEEL like a heartier dish.

I mean, YUM. There is nothing like a giant pot of love to start the week off right.

This sweet potato chowder is a hug in a bowl! Made with lots of greens and crunchy pancetta and pepitas for topping, it's a perfect weeknight meal.

Sweet Potato Chowder

Sweet Potato Chowder

This sweet potato chowder is a hug in a bowl! Made with lots of greens and crunchy pancetta and pepitas for topping, it’s a perfect weeknight meal.

  • 4 ounces pancetta, (diced)
  • 1 tablespoon unsalted butter
  • 1 sweet onion, (diced)
  • 3 garlic cloves, (minced)
  • ½ teaspoon salt
  • ½ teaspoon pepper
  • ¼ teaspoon ground sage
  • ¼ teaspoon freshly ground nutmeg
  • ½ cup chopped carrots
  • 3 cups chopped sweet potato, (about 1 inch in size)
  • 5 cups reduced-sodium chicken stock
  • ⅓ cup cream, half and half or coconut cream/milk
  • 2 cups chopped tuscan kale
  • 3 tablespoons roasted salted pepitas, (for topping)
  1. Heat a large pot over medium-low heat and add the pancetta. Cook, stirring occasionally, until the fat is rendered and the pancetta is crisp, about 6 to 8 minutes. Remove the pancetta with a slotted spoon and place it on a paper towel lined plate to remove any excess grease.
  2. Keep the pot on medium low heat and add the butter. Stir in the onion, garlic, salt, pepper and sage. Stir in the fresh nutmeg. Cook, stirring occasionally, until the onions softened, about 5 minutes. Stir in the carrots and sweet potato, tossing everything to combine.
  3. Pour in the chicken stock and bring the mixture to a boil. Reduce it to a simmer and cook for 10 minutes. Cover and cook for an additional 10 to 15 minutes, or until the sweet potatoes cubes soften. Stir in the cream/halfhalf/etc. Taste the soup and season with additional salt or pepper if needed, but remember we will add the salty pancetta back on top too!
  4. A few minutes before serving, stir in the kale. I like to serve it almost immediately, but you can simmer the soup for another 10 minutes or so to soften it.
  5. Serve with the pancetta and pepitas for topping.

This sweet potato chowder is a hug in a bowl! Made with lots of greens and crunchy pancetta and pepitas for topping, it's a perfect weeknight meal.

Acceptable to eat for breakfast? I think.

The post Sweet Potato Chowder. appeared first on How Sweet Eats.