Dry Lambrusco Is Delicious—Why Is It Also So Hard To Find?

I can pinpoint the only moment I’ve ever felt cool in the presence of a bartender: It was early summer 2018 at a casual yet self-serious bar in my native Chicago, and I ordered a dry Lambrusco. “I love Lambrusco,” he said, affirming my early-adopter st…

I can pinpoint the only moment I’ve ever felt cool in the presence of a bartender: It was early summer 2018 at a casual yet self-serious bar in my native Chicago, and I ordered a dry Lambrusco. “I love Lambrusco,” he said, affirming my early-adopter status for the first and last time. “I want to get everyone drinking it.” 

A far cry from the cloying, bulk-produced juice that dominated the category in the 1970s and ’80s, the new guard of Lambrusco from Italy’s Emilia-Romagna region represents everything I like in a wine: A chilled, low-ABV red with a gentle, prickly fizz, it’s equal parts no-brainer and deserving of deep contemplation. It’s low intervention and artisanally made, and almost always under $20 a bottle. It’s delicious with pizza, cured snacks, and richly sauced pastas—or all by itself at 5 in the afternoon. It’s also still irritatingly hard to find.

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2 Thanksgiving-Ready Menus That Pair Perfectly With Wine

We’ve teamed up with Erath Winery—known for their critically acclaimed Oregon wines—to share food-and-wine pairing ideas perfect for the fall season. Thanksgiving’s almost here, so we’ve cooked up two holiday-ready menus, including our favorite wines f…

We've teamed up with Erath Winery—known for their critically acclaimed Oregon wines—to share food-and-wine pairing ideas perfect for the fall season. Thanksgiving's almost here, so we've cooked up two holiday-ready menus, including our favorite wines from Erath Winery to sip alongside 'em.


While I'm always happy to sip whatever wine is being poured at the dinner table—especially if I'm a guest at someone else's house—when it comes down to it, I've definitely got my favorites. During the summer, it's rosé all the way, especially something dry with notes of tart fruit and a fresh acidity. But once the cooler weather rolls in, I say goodbye to rosé for the season and dive in to my favorite red wines.

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Yes, There Are Sparkling Red Wines That Taste Good

When I was in college I had a roommate whom I loved dearly, but who had incredibly different taste from me. I whipped cream by hand while she bought a tub of Cool Whip. I drank red wine while she drank fruity vodka concoctions whose names shouldn&rsquo…

When I was in college I had a roommate whom I loved dearly, but who had incredibly different taste from me. I whipped cream by hand while she bought a tub of Cool Whip. I drank red wine while she drank fruity vodka concoctions whose names shouldn’t be repeated in polite company.  

So, when one day she brought home a bottle of sparkling red wine that she was over the moon about, I was skeptical. Plus, red wine isn’t supposed to be fizzy, right?  

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The Only Summer Wines You Need, According to a Wine Pro

These days, we’re certainly spending a bit more time in the house or hanging out with friends at their homes. As we know all too well, 2020 gave us a taste of a slower life, as we spent more time inside than we ever could’ve imagined was possible. Bore…

These days, we’re certainly spending a bit more time in the house or hanging out with friends at their homes. As we know all too well, 2020 gave us a taste of a slower life, as we spent more time inside than we ever could’ve imagined was possible. Boredom set in. We all felt a little like Bill Murray in Groundhog Day.

Fortunately, our resilience came out to play—and when 2020 gave us lemons, we made lemonade. We purchased all the home essentials, decked out our outdoor spaces, and perfected recipes that we’re still proud to share with friends. In short, we all mastered the art of entertaining. And kudos to us for keeping the party going!

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For a Low-Key Night, Snacks & Wine Are All I Need

We teamed up with A to Z Wineworks—a certified B-Corp known for their food-friendly wines made in Oregon—to share the laid-back snacks we’re cozying up with this winter, plus our fave sip to go with: their 2017 A to Z Pinot Noir.

Here’s something yo…

We teamed up with A to Z Wineworks—a certified B-Corp known for their food-friendly wines made in Oregon—to share the laid-back snacks we’re cozying up with this winter, plus our fave sip to go with: their 2017 A to Z Pinot Noir.


Here’s something you should know about me: My ideal holiday evening consists of drinking wine and snacking…while sitting on the couch in my pajamas. Don’t get me wrong, I love to cook a big holiday meal, get dressed up, and hit a cookie-swap party—or three. But this year, I’m staying home and keeping things low-key.

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Why Box Wine Is Your Best Bet This Thanksgiving (& Beyond)

Box wine is sometimes jokingly referred to as “Cardbordeaux,” thought of as a college party drink we wouldn’t serve on a sophisticated table. But we’re here to tell you that times, they are a-changin’. The newer, upscale boxes from smaller domestic pro…

Box wine is sometimes jokingly referred to as “Cardbordeaux,” thought of as a college party drink we wouldn’t serve on a sophisticated table. But we’re here to tell you that times, they are a-changin'. The newer, upscale boxes from smaller domestic producers or cult European importers are a maybe-overlooked, actually optimal choice for this year’s meal—once opened, they store up to a month in the refrigerator.

In Europe, “bag in a box” wines are a growth segment, popular because they’re sustainable—less packaging, less fuel burned in transportation, smaller carbon footprint—and low-cost, usually coming in at $20 to $40 for four-bottles-worth of volume. Here, they can be an insider trick; one of the biggest markets in the U.S. for this wine are chefs in higher-end kitchens who “want wine that is of a higher quality to use in cooking, and stays fresh longer,” says Camilo Ceballos, wine director of New York–based wine importer Omni Wines.

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Best New York Sour

Here’s how to make the New York Sour: of the the best cocktails out there! Make a classic whiskey sour and float a layer of red wine on top. May we introduce you to one of the most stunning and complex cocktails out there: the New York Sour! Now, this Classic Whiskey Sour stands out as a fan favorite (and personal one) in our long list of cocktail recipes. So when we tried this New York Sour: well, it blew us away! First you have the whiskey sour layer: sweet tart and perfectly balanced, sweetened with maple for some nuance. Then float a layer of red wine over the top and it adds intrigue, complexity and a fruity acidity. Not to mention it looks simply stunning with the bright two-toned layer. Even better: it’s easy to make! Here’s how it’s done. What’s in a New York Sour? The New York Sour is a well-known variation on the whiskey sour that floats a layer of red wine on top. It’s thought to have been invented by a bartender in the 1880’s in Chicago, then picked up and made popular in New York City (hence the name). The whiskey sour is a […]

A Couple Cooks – Healthy, Whole Food, & Vegetarian Recipes

Here’s how to make the New York Sour: of the the best cocktails out there! Make a classic whiskey sour and float a layer of red wine on top.

New York Sour

May we introduce you to one of the most stunning and complex cocktails out there: the New York Sour! Now, this Classic Whiskey Sour stands out as a fan favorite (and personal one) in our long list of cocktail recipes. So when we tried this New York Sour: well, it blew us away! First you have the whiskey sour layer: sweet tart and perfectly balanced, sweetened with maple for some nuance. Then float a layer of red wine over the top and it adds intrigue, complexity and a fruity acidity. Not to mention it looks simply stunning with the bright two-toned layer. Even better: it’s easy to make! Here’s how it’s done.

What’s in a New York Sour?

The New York Sour is a well-known variation on the whiskey sour that floats a layer of red wine on top. It’s thought to have been invented by a bartender in the 1880’s in Chicago, then picked up and made popular in New York City (hence the name). The whiskey sour is a actually classic cocktail that’s on the list of International Bartender Association’s IBA official cocktails. This means it has an official definition. Add a layer of wine and you’ve got this classic red wine cocktail:

  • Bourbon whiskey: as high quality as possible (you can use any whiskey, but we prefer the flavor of bourbon)
  • Lemon juice
  • Simple syrup (we use maple syrup; more below)
  • Red wine
New York Sour

How to make a New York Sour (and make a perfect layer)

Though it looks showy, the New York Sour is actually very easy to make! You just need to know a little trick about making that beautiful red wine layer.

  • Shake: Combine the bourbon, lemon juice and syrup in a cocktail shaker and shake until cold Strain it into a glass.
  • Make the red wine layer: Here’s the fun part! Hold the back of a spoon right above the top of the glass. Then gently pour the red wine on top of the spoon into the glass. Because it hits the spoon first, it will settle into a layer on top.
New York Sour

Maple syrup vs simple syrup

The sweetener for a whiskey sour is traditionally simple syrup. But you can also use maple syrup in this New York Sour! Alex and I have switched to using maple syrup for many of our cocktail recipes. Here’s why:

  • Maple syrup gives a nuanced sweetness. Simple syrup gives a drink a straightforward, piercing sweetness. In contrast, the sweetness with maple is more nuanced and adds complexity to the drink. Most importantly: it doesn’t taste like maple at all! (Really.)
  • It’s a natural sweetener (not refined sugar). Maple syrup still contains sugar, of course! But if you like to use natural sweeteners, this is the way to go.

The whiskey: rye vs bourbon

You can make a New York Sour with either rye or bourbon whiskey! But Alex and I generally prefer the sweeter flavor of bourbon to the spicy flavor of rye. In our classic Whiskey Sour, we always use bourbon when we serve it (you can also call it a bourbon sour). Of course, feel free to use whatever suits your fancy! If you have local options, this is a great way to give them a go!

In general, we prefer the taste of bourbon whiskey to rye in cocktails. We use bourbon in our Old Fashioned, Manhattan, and Boulevardier cocktails! We’d highly recommend them if you love bourbon drinks.

Whiskey

Another whiskey sour variation: the Boston Sour

Another variation on the classic whiskey sour is this Boston Sour! It has an egg white foam topping, which is often an addition to sour cocktails. It makes it feel like a true 1920’s style drink! If you’ve never tried an egg white foam, we’ve cracked the code to making that perfect, frothy foam.

More classic sour cocktails!

Here are a few more of our classic cocktails to add to your repertoire that are all part of the family of sour cocktails! Sour cocktails are all mixed drinks that have liquor, lemon or lime juice, and a sweetener.

  • Classic Margarita The very best classic margarita: lime, tequila and Cointreau. One of the original ours! Or try our 10+ margarita variations.
  • Tom Collins Cocktail A Tom Collins is also known as a gin sour: is light and bubbly with soda water.
  • Gin Fizz The Gin Fizz is another gin sour: the classic. It has a frothy egg white foam topping.
  • Classic Daiquiri The Classic Daiquiri is actually not frozen! It’s rum, lime juice, and sweetener.
New York Sour

When to serve a New York Sour

The New York Sour is a red wine cocktail that’s tasty as it is versatile. It’s perfect for sipping as a:

  • Happy hour drink
  • Dinner party drink
  • Summer patio drink
  • Late night drinks drink
  • Guys or girls night drink
  • Cocktail hour drink
Print
New York Sour

BEST New York Sour


1 Star2 Stars3 Stars4 Stars5 Stars (5 votes, average: 5.00 out of 5)

  • Author: Sonja Overhiser
  • Prep Time: 5 minutes
  • Cook Time: 0 minutes
  • Total Time: 5 minutes
  • Yield: 1 drink
  • Diet: Vegan

Description

Here’s how to make the New York Sour: of the the best cocktails out there! Make a classic whiskey sour and float a layer of red wine on top.


Ingredients

  • 2 ounces (4 tablespoons) bourbon whiskey
  • 1 ounce ( 2 tablespoons) lemon juice
  • 1/2 ounce (1 tablespoon) maple syrup or simple syrup
  • 1 ounce (2 tablespoons) dry red wine
  • Optional garnish: lemon twist

Instructions

  1. Add the bourbon, lemon juice, and syrup to cocktail shaker and fill it with a handful of ice. Shake until very cold.
  2. Strain the drink into an ice-filled lowball or Old Fashioned glass.
  3. Carefully pour the red wine over back of spoon just above the surface of the drink, creating a layer on top. Serve with a lemon twist if desired.

  • Category: Drinks
  • Method: Shaken
  • Cuisine: Cocktails

Keywords: New York Sour, New York Sour Recipe, Red Wine Cocktail

A Couple Cooks - Healthy, Whole Food, & Vegetarian Recipes

Afraid of Red Wine Stains? Memorize This Handy Trick

Home is the place we feel the most like ourselves—where we kick off our shoes, share our meals, and make memories. We’re taking our love for all things home and bringing it to Instagram. Follow along at Home52 and make yourselves—well, you know.

On …

Home is the place we feel the most like ourselves—where we kick off our shoes, share our meals, and make memories. We’re taking our love for all things home and bringing it to Instagram. Follow along at Home52 and make yourselves—well, you know.


On a recent Friday night, I ventured to a BYOB restaurant for dinner with a group. After waiting in line for 30 minutes to place our orders, we sat at a picnic table and started to uncork the bottles of wine we'd brought. I was pretty jazzed about my 2017 Les Heretiques, a natural, French Carignan, so I carefully poured healthy servings into flimsy plastic cups and set the open bottle down in the middle of the table. I took a sip and was delighted to find the red table wine was just to my taste—tannic, medium-bodied, and full of dark fruit.

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Red Wine Bucatini with Pancetta and Parmesan.

This is where I try to convince you to make red wine pasta! Annnd moving right along to Valentine’s Day dinner… here we are! Though I have to say that I would like a plate of red wine bucatini for dinner TONIGHT. Just a regular old Wednesday. I mean, why not?  I first saw this […]

The post Red Wine Bucatini with Pancetta and Parmesan. appeared first on How Sweet Eats.

This is where I try to convince you to make red wine pasta!

This red wine pasta is an easy, flavorful dinner! Red wine cooked down with garlic and butter until sauce-like. Throw in noodles and you have dinner!

Annnd moving right along to Valentine’s Day dinner… here we are!

Though I have to say that I would like a plate of red wine bucatini for dinner TONIGHT. Just a regular old Wednesday. I mean, why not? 

garlic + butter

I first saw this recipe before Christmas and instantly wanted it but also instantly thought it would be perrrfect for Valentine’s Day. Seriously, I haven’t stopped thinking about it! And of course, I was super intrigued too – pasta tossed in red wine? HELLO! I am so there. 

I have never seen anything like this or even heard of the dish (though a quick google search told me it’s definitely a thing) – most likely because I have zero Italian roots anywhere. Plus, it’s my least favorite cuisine so it’s not like I’m out searching for Italian recipes to make all the time.

But this! 

Red wine pasta might be a game changer. Italian food is slowly creeping up the list for me. 

bucatini pasta

What I love about this recipe?

It’s oddly simple. Simple in terms of ingredients – not flavor! It’s kind of like a cacio e pepe or an easy traditional carbonara. A pasta tossed with tons of flavor and not lots of ingredients – it’s not like there is shrimp or a lot of roasted vegetables or anything twirled in between the noodles. You know?

This red wine pasta is an easy, flavorful dinner! Red wine cooked down with garlic and butter until sauce-like. Throw in noodles and you have dinner!

Instead, you cook a ton of garlic and red pepper flakes until golden and fragrant and THEN you pour in an entire bottle of red wine. Yes. An entire bottle! You cook it down until it has reduced by nearly half. Then you toss your pasta directly in it (with tons of butter) and the pasta soaks up all the wine. 

In a really good way, that is. It soaks up all the rich flavor.

This red wine pasta is an easy, flavorful dinner! Red wine cooked down with garlic and butter until sauce-like. Throw in noodles and you have dinner!

And then we go and make it even MORE flavorful by topping it with pancetta and parmesan and herbs.

This red wine pasta is an easy, flavorful dinner! Red wine cooked down with garlic and butter until sauce-like. Throw in noodles and you have dinner!

Oh

my 

word. 

This red wine pasta is an easy, flavorful dinner! Red wine cooked down with garlic and butter until sauce-like. Throw in noodles and you have dinner!

I am completely in LOVE with this. It’s so different from anything I’ve had before. And I love the idea of serving it for Valentine’s Day! This alone is filling enough for me (I mean, sure, maybe add some garlic bread, why not?) but you could absolutely add something on the side! Like sautéed shrimp? Serve it as a side to a filet? Or just make a really big house salad to go along with it. 

I swear you are going to love.it. 

This red wine pasta is an easy, flavorful dinner! Red wine cooked down with garlic and butter until sauce-like. Throw in noodles and you have dinner!

Red Wine Pasta with Pancetta and Parmesan

Red Wine Bucatini with Pancetta and Parmesan

This red wine pasta is an easy, flavorful dinner! Red wine cooked down with garlic and butter until sauce-like. Throw in noodles and you have dinner!

  • 4 ounces diced pancetta
  • 1 tablespoon unsalted butter
  • 6 garlic cloves, (minced or pressed)
  • ¼ teaspoon crushed red pepper flakes
  • pinch of salt and pepper
  • 1 (750mL) bottle red wine, such as cabernet or pinot noir
  • 1 pound bucatini pasta
  • 4 tablespoons unsalted butter
  • 2 ounces freshly grated parmesan cheese
  • chopped fresh parsley and basil for topping
  1. Heat a large pot over medium heat and add the pancetta. Cook until the pancetta is crispy and the fat has been rendered. Remove the pancetta with a slotted spoon and place it on a paper towel to drain any excess grease.
  2. Add the 1 tablespoon of butter to the pot and keep it over medium heat. Add in the garlic and pepper flakes with a pinch of salt and pepper. Cook, stirring often, until the garlic is fragrant and slightly golden, about 2 to 3 minutes. Pour in the red wine and bring it to a book. Cook uncovered, stirring occasionally, until the wine reduces by ½ to ⅔ – this will take about 20 minutes.
  3. While the red wine is boiling, bring a pot of salted water to a boil and cook the bucatini. Cook it until it’s very al dente – about 9 to 10 minutes – then transfer it to the red wine in the pot.
  4. Add the butter to the pot with the pasta as well. Toss the pasta in the red wine sauce and cook it for another 2 to 3 minutes – the sauce will thicken and the noodles will soak it up. Toss in the pancetta.
  5. Serve the pasta and top with the parmesan and herbs.

slightly adapted from bon appetit

This red wine pasta is an easy, flavorful dinner! Red wine cooked down with garlic and butter until sauce-like. Throw in noodles and you have dinner!

This dinner is gold.

The post Red Wine Bucatini with Pancetta and Parmesan. appeared first on How Sweet Eats.

Red Wine Short Ribs Are Like a Big Cozy Sweater for Your Taste Buds

We’ve partnered with Cakebread Cellars—a Napa Valley winery renowned for its elegant and food-friendly bottlings—to share Senior Editor Eric Kim’s favorite way to spend a winter evening: cozying up with tender short ribs and a glass of their Two Creeks…

We've partnered with Cakebread Cellars—a Napa Valley winery renowned for its elegant and food-friendly bottlings—to share Senior Editor Eric Kim's favorite way to spend a winter evening: cozying up with tender short ribs and a glass of their Two Creeks Vineyard Pinot Noir.


When it's cold outside, there are certain dishes I turn to over and over: the cozy squash and guanciale pasta that’s easier to make than a sandwich; the blue cheese burger that makes my taste buds dance; and the wine-braised short ribs that are like curling up in an oversized sweater.

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