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Many cuisines around the world feature a ham and cheese sandwich. For instance, in France, there is a ham and cheese baguette. In…
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Many cuisines around the world feature a ham and cheese sandwich. For instance, in France, there is a ham and cheese baguette. In…

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Glazed Ham Steaks

Glazed ham steaks are a quick and easy dinner idea that only takes a few ingredients and about 15 minutes to prepare.

The post Glazed Ham Steaks appeared first on Budget Bytes.

I don’t know about you, but it feels like Thanksgiving was just yesterday and I’m not ready to make another big dinner yet. So for Christmas, I’m making these super simple ham steaks instead of a full glazed ham. They’re so incredibly quick, I get my ham fix, and I can spend Christmas day relaxing. 😎 These glazed ham steaks are so good and so easy that they’ll probably be making their way into my normal dinner rotation, too.

Two glazed ham steaks on a plate with Brussels sprouts and sweet potato

Shown with Roasted Brussels Sprouts and a baked sweet potato.

What Kind of Ham to Use

I like a thick-cut (½-inch thick) sliced ham steak for this recipe because it gives it more of a main-dish type feel. There are many options for sliced ham or sliced ham quarters in the grocery store (near the refrigerated cured meats) and you can use just about any of them. If you end up with ham that is sliced more thinly, you’ll just cook for a shorter amount of time during the browning step below. And you may need to make more glaze if you’re trying to cover more pieces.

Other Glaze Options

The glaze I used here is a sweet and slightly tangy mix that reduces to a nice sticky glaze. You can’t really taste the Dijon mustard in the end, but if you don’t like Dijon or simply don’t have any on hand, you can also use a sweet-spicy-smoky rub like I used in my Glazed Pork Chops recipe.

How are the Leftovers?

I love, love, loved eating the leftovers of this ham. So much so that I think I might meal prep this on a regular basis! Glazes like this don’t stay clear and glossy after refrigeration, but they still taste great!

What to Serve with Glazed Ham Steaks

I served my glazed ham with Roasted Brussels Sprouts and a baked sweet potato, but it would also go great with classics like Homemade Mac and Cheese, Potato Salad, Three Bean Salad, Roasted Broccoli, or a Broccoli Cheese Casserole.

For something like a mini Christmas Dinner, I’d probably pair it with Potatoes Au Gratin, Balsamic Glazed Carrots, Roasted Brussels, and Apple Walnut Stuffing.

Side view of glazed ham steaks on the plate with sides
Side view of glazed ham steaks on the plate with sides

Glazed Ham Steaks

Glazed ham steaks are a quick and easy dinner idea that only takes a few ingredients and about 15 minutes to prepare.
Course Dinner, Main Course
Cuisine American
Total Cost $5.48 recipe / $1.37 serving
Prep Time 5 minutes
Cook Time 10 minutes
Total Time 15 minutes
Servings 4 4oz. each
Calories 220kcal
Author Beth – Budget Bytes

Ingredients

  • 1/4 cup brown sugar $0.12
  • 1 Tbsp Dijon mustard $0.18
  • 1 tsp Worcestershire sauce $0.02
  • 1 tsp apple cider vinegar $0.02
  • 1/8 tsp garlic powder $0.02
  • 1/8 tsp ground cloves $0.02
  • 2 8oz. ham steaks $5.00
  • 1 Tbsp butter $0.10

Instructions

  • Combine the brown sugar, Dijon, Worcestershire sauce, vinegar, garlic powder, and cloves in a small bowl.
  • Cut the ham steaks in half to create four 4oz. portions.
  • Add the butter to a skillet and heat over medium. When the butter is melted, swirl the skillet to coat the surface. Add the ham steaks and cook for 3-5 minutes on each side, or until browned.
  • Spoon half of the glaze mixture over the ham steaks, flip, then add the second half of the glaze. Cook for 1-2 minutes more on each side, or until the glaze becomes thick and sticky. Serve hot.

Nutrition

Serving: 1serving | Calories: 220kcal | Carbohydrates: 14g | Protein: 22g | Fat: 8g | Sodium: 1525mg | Fiber: 1g
Glazed Ham Steaks in the skillet close up

How to Make Glazed Ham Steaks – Step by Step Photos

Ham glaze ingredients in a bowl

Make the glaze first. In a small bowl, combine ¼ cup brown sugar, 1 Tbsp Dijon mustard, 1 tsp Worcestershire sauce, 1 tsp apple cider vinegar, ⅛ tsp garlic powder, and ⅛ tsp ground cloves.

ham steak packages

These are the ham steaks I used. You can use any type of ham steak available, but if they are thinner than ½-inch, you’ll need to reduce the cooking time from the estimates I have given.

Ham steaks cut in half

Each of the ham steaks were 8oz., so I cut them in half to create four 4oz. portions. Portion your ham as you see fit.

Browned ham steaks in the skillet

Add 1 Tbsp butter to a large skillet and heat over medium. When the butter is melted, give the skillet a swirl to coat the surface. Add the ham and cook for a few minutes on each side, or until browned.

Glaze being spooned over the ham steaks in the skillet

Spoon half of the glaze mixture over the ham steaks, then flip them over and add the rest.

Finished glazed ham in the skillet

Cook the ham for a minute or two more on each side, or until the glaze has reduced.

Overhead view of glazed ham on a plate with sides

Serve hot with your favorite sides!

The post Glazed Ham Steaks appeared first on Budget Bytes.

Two Million Pounds of Pork Have Been Recalled Across the U.S.

Not to be dramatic, but you probably shouldn’t serve a spiral-glazed ham for Christmas this year. Not smoked ham either, nor an applewood smoked ham, not even a fully cooked spiral sliced honey ham, and nope, not a boneless ham with water added. Those …

Not to be dramatic, but you probably shouldn’t serve a spiral-glazed ham for Christmas this year. Not smoked ham either, nor an applewood smoked ham, not even a fully cooked spiral sliced honey ham, and nope, not a boneless ham with water added. Those are just a few of the pork products that are being recalled all across the country, due to listeria contamination. The USDA has announced one of the most massive recalls in recent history—it includes more than two million pounds of pork, including two dozen types of ham and multiple pepperoni products.

The pork was distributed, and subsequently recalled, by Alexander & Hornung, a unit of Perdue Premium Meat Company based in Michigan. The products made their way onto the shelves of grocery stores including Big Y and Whole Foods.

Read More >>

What the Hock Is a Ham Hock?

If you’ve ever had slow-cooked collard greens or stewed pinto beans or navy beans, there’s always that deeper, saltier flavor lingering in the background. Sometimes it’s due in part to bacon or pancetta, or if you’re a vegetarian, miso paste and mushro…

If you’ve ever had slow-cooked collard greens or stewed pinto beans or navy beans, there’s always that deeper, saltier flavor lingering in the background. Sometimes it’s due in part to bacon or pancetta, or if you’re a vegetarian, miso paste and mushrooms, but often the flavor comes from a ham hock, which is a cut of pork that’s also known as pork knuckle.

What Are Ham Hocks?

On first read, they’re not the most appealing cut of meat. Pork knuckle is the joint that attaches the ankle and calf of a pig; this cut of meat contains plenty of connective tissue, skin, tendons, and ligaments. This is why hocks take a lot of cooking to become tender. Ham hocks are typically cured with salt and smoked, which brings out the very best flavor of the knuckle. However, as all of the collagen and fat in the hocks breaks down and caramelizes, it renders a smoky, savory flavor that enhances soups, stews, and sauces.

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Leftover Stuffing Muffins

Use up your Thanksgiving leftovers in these customizable savory Leftover Stuffing Muffins. The perfect grab-and-go breakfast!

The post Leftover Stuffing Muffins appeared first on Budget Bytes.

We’re all about reducing food waste over here at Budget Bytes, so I want to make sure you’ve got plenty of options for enjoying your Thanksgiving leftovers later this week! These Leftover Stuffing Muffins have been a reader favorite since they were posted back in 2014, and since I made them again myself last week I decided to give the photos a little facelift. The recipe is the same as always, simple, delicious, and portable. ;) These tasty little savory muffins make a great grab-n-go breakfast!

Originally posted 11/29/2014, updated 11/23/2021.

close up overhead shot of stuffing muffins on a cooling rack

What is a Stuffing Muffin?

Okay, these are basically like those little egg bites that you can get at Starbucks, but with leftover stuffing added into the mix. In addition to the eggs and stuffing, I also added leftover turkey and spinach. So it’s like little single-serving baked eggs with meat, vegetables, and stuffing. Super tasty, super portable, and the perfect make-ahead breakfast!

Choose Your Ingredients

These great little muffins are a super flexible way to combine your Thanksgiving leftovers into a “new” meal and avoid Thanksgiving burnout. The bulk of this recipe is leftover stuffing (dressing), but you can add a variety of other ingredients into the mix and make them your own. Here are some other ingredients that would taste awesome in these Leftover Stuffing Muffins:

  • Chopped broccoli
  • Chopped ham
  • Roasted sweet potatoes or butternut squash
  • Chopped green beans
  • Mushrooms
  • Corn
  • Cheese (cheddar, brie, mozzarella, feta, goat)

Whatever you decide to add, make sure it’s chopped into small pieces!

Bake it as a Casserole

While I haven’t done this yet, you could definitely bake this as a breakfast casserole, just like a strata. This amount of ingredients would probably fit an an 8×8 or 9×9-inch casserole dish. You’ll need to bake it until the center reaches an internal temperature of 160ºF.

How Long Do They Last?

You’ll want to either freeze or eat these leftover stuffing muffins within a few days, assuming you made them the day after Thanksgiving. Unfortunately, there’s no exact lifespan of dishes like this because the freshness and safety of leftovers can depend on so many different things, like how long the ingredients stayed at room temperature before they were refrigerated, the conditions within your refrigerator, and how quickly they were able to cool down once inside the refrigerator. When in doubt, play it safe!

close up of a stuffing muffin that has been bitten into
Close up of leftover stuffing muffins on a cooling rack

Leftover Stuffing Muffins

Use up your Thanksgiving leftovers in these customizable savory Leftover Stuffing Muffins. The perfect grab-and-go breakfast!
Prep Time 15 minutes
Cook Time 25 minutes
Total Time 40 minutes
Servings 12 muffins
Calories 143kcal
Author Beth – Budget Bytes

Ingredients

  • 2 tsp butter (for greasing the muffin tin)
  • 3 cups prepared stuffing or dressing
  • 1 cup chopped turkey or ham
  • 1/4 lb. frozen spinach, thawed and squeezed
  • 6 large eggs
  • 2 Tbsp milk
  • 1/4 tsp salt
  • 1/4 tsp Freshly cracked pepper

Instructions

  • Preheat the oven to 375 degrees. Grease a muffin tin with butter, oil, or non-stick spray. Thaw and squeeze the spinach dry.
  • Add the stuffing, turkey, and spinach to a bowl, then stir gently to combine without breaking up the stuffing too much.
  • Divide the stuffing mixture between all 12 wells of the muffin tin. Leave the stuffing loosely packed in the cups so that the egg mixture can fill in around the stuffing.
  • In a medium bowl, whisk together the eggs, milk, salt, and pepper. Divide the egg mixture among the 12 wells, starting with 2 Tbsp per muffin and then adding a little bit more until all of the egg mixture has been used. The egg will not fully cover the stuffing, it will puff up as it bakes.
  • Bake the muffins for 25-30 minutes or until golden brown and crispy on the top. Allow the muffins to cool slightly, then run a knife around the edges to loosen and remove each muffin. Serve warm.

Nutrition

Serving: 1muffin | Calories: 143kcal | Carbohydrates: 12g | Protein: 7g | Fat: 7g | Sodium: 347mg | Fiber: 2g

How to Make Leftover Stuffing Muffins – Step by Step Photos

Greased muffin tin

Start by preheating the oven to 375ºF. Grease a muffin tin with butter, oil, or non-stick spray.

Stuffing muffin ingredients in a bowl, not mixed

First, mix together your solid ingredients. This is where you can get creative. I used 3 cups of leftover herb stuffing, 1 cup of chopped Thanksgiving turkey, and 1/4 lb. of frozen spinach (thawed and squeezed dry). Whatever you use, make sure it’s chopped into small pieces and all vegetables have been cooked down to remove most of their moisture. 

Muffin ingredients stirred together in a bowl

Gently stir the ingredients together until combined. Try not to stir too vigorously because that moist stuffing can kind of turn into a paste if stirred too much, and you want this mixture to remain chunky.

Solid ingredients added to the muffin tin

Divide the stuffing mixture between the 12 wells of a muffin tin. Do not pack the stuffing down into the well, you want there to be some empty space to be filled in with the egg mixture.

milk and eggs in a bowl with a whisk

Whisk together 6 eggs, 2 Tbsp of milk or cream, 1/4 tsp salt, and ¼ tsp freshly cracked pepper. Whisk until it’s really smooth to make it easier to pour into the muffin tins.

Egg mixture being scooped into the muffin tin

Divide the whisked egg mixture between all 12 wells of the muffin tin. To make sure you don’t run out of egg mixture, start by adding just 2 Tbsp to each well, then go back to add a little bit more to each until you’ve used all of the egg mixture. The egg will not fully cover the solid ingredients. The egg will puff up quite a bit as it bakes.

baked leftover stuffing muffins

Bake the Leftover Stuffing Muffins in the preheated 375ºF oven for 25-30 minutes, or until the tops are brown and crispy on the edges. Let them cool slightly, then run a knife around the edges to help loosen and remove the muffins.

Close up of leftover stuffing muffins on a cooling rack

Allow them to cool to room temperature, then transfer to an air-tight container to store in the refrigerator or freezer. A quick zap in the microwave will make them hot and breakfast ready!

The post Leftover Stuffing Muffins appeared first on Budget Bytes.

A Glistening Glazed Ham for the Holidays (& Lots of Good Leftovers)

We’ve partnered with Imagery Wine Collection—a portfolio of unique, artistically inspired wines—to share a showstopping holiday main from Adrianna Guevara Adarme of A Cozy Kitchen, plus her favorite way to repurpose the leftovers (hint: brunch is invol…

We’ve partnered with Imagery Wine Collection—a portfolio of unique, artistically inspired wines—to share a showstopping holiday main from Adrianna Guevara Adarme of A Cozy Kitchen, plus her favorite way to repurpose the leftovers (hint: brunch is involved).


One of the easiest ways to impress your guests at any holiday meal—besides having a few great bottles of wine on the table, like the ones from Imagery Wine Collection—is with a giant, golden-brown baked ham. It’s a nice detour from the classic turkey, plus there’s no dry meat and you won’t have to worry about anybody fighting over a certain part of the bird. It also makes way better leftovers, if you ask me.

Read More >>

I Have No Idea How Much Ham to Buy Per Person

When it comes to planning the ham for Easter or Christmas dinner (or any meal where a large-format pork will be the hero), a number of questions present themselves almost immediately: Where should I buy the ham? What type of ham should I buy? Bone-in o…

When it comes to planning the ham for Easter or Christmas dinner (or any meal where a large-format pork will be the hero), a number of questions present themselves almost immediately: Where should I buy the ham? What type of ham should I buy? Bone-in or boneless? How much ham per person? and so on. Odds are your holiday meal has been a bit smaller in recent years, but intimate gatherings with family and friends are starting to get back to normal. These questions remain just as important when serving your household of three as they were when you were hosting 20. It’s intimidating enough to host a larger-than-normal group of loved ones and the cost of food, wine, and festive décor can add up fast. You don’t want to spend more than you need to, so, let’s break down exactly how many pounds of boneless or bone-in ham you need per guest.

How much ham per person?

The best rule of thumb for ham is to plan about 1/2 pound per person when picking a bone-in ham (it’s heavier) and 1/3 pound if boneless. Look, at the end of the day, some people will eat more than expected, some will eat less—it’ll even out. If you’re making a lot of side dishes, err on the smaller side; if you texted your roommates "ham party at 3 p.m. on Sunday," consider buying more. And if you definitely want leftovers for ham sandwiches, breakfast omelettes and quiches, or mini ham croquettes, then go for an extra pound or two.

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How to Cook a Spiral Ham (& Enjoy It for Days)

Spiral sliced ham is, in fact, an American invention. Harry Hoenselaar, the founder of the HoneyBaked Ham Company, built the world’s first spiral-slicing machine in 1924. The idea, he said, had come to him in a dream, and his prototype was assembled fr…

Spiral sliced ham is, in fact, an American invention. Harry Hoenselaar, the founder of the HoneyBaked Ham Company, built the world's first spiral-slicing machine in 1924. The idea, he said, had come to him in a dream, and his prototype was assembled from "a tire jack, a pie tin, a washing machine motor, and a knife." If you're as enamored by the idea of this gorgeous meat helix as we are and wondering how to cook a spiral ham at home, you've come to the right place. Let's cut the fat, and get right down to the bone of how to treat your ham right, so you and your guests can properly feast on this succulent American classic.

What Is a Spiral Ham?

A spiral ham is, in a nutshell, a bone-in ham that's been sliced with a special spiral-slicing machine, which carves the meat into perfectly thin slices while allowing it to retain its show-stopping centerpiece shape for optimal presentation. All spiral sliced hams are pre-cooked, so there is actually no need to cook a spiral ham—it's ready to eat. Nonetheless, there are two additional steps to take in order to get the most enjoyment out of your ham: heating and glazing.

Read More >>

Split Pea Soup

Let’s talk soup! It is one of my favorite things to make during the cold months. I love a good one pot meal that is hearty, comforting, and nourishing. This homemade Split Pea Soup is filled with tender vegetables, robust herbs and spices, and it…

Let’s talk soup! It is one of my favorite things to make during the cold months. I love a good one pot meal that is hearty, comforting, and nourishing. This homemade Split Pea Soup is filled with tender vegetables, robust herbs and spices, and it’s flavored with savory ham. This is one of Josh’s all-time…

The post Split Pea Soup appeared first on Two Peas & Their Pod.