Our 19 Favorite Ground Beef Recipes

When it comes to dinnertime, a pound of ground beef can be the start of something great. I’m thinking meatballs floating in tomato-butter sauce or minestrone soup (or even grape jelly—don’t knock it till you’ve tried it!). Or maybe smash burgers slathe…

When it comes to dinnertime, a pound of ground beef can be the start of something great. I’m thinking meatballs floating in tomato-butter sauce or minestrone soup (or even grape jelly—don’t knock it till you’ve tried it!). Or maybe smash burgers slathered with ketchup and mustard, shatteringly crisp lumpia, spicy kebabs wrapped tightly in chapati, a steaming bowl of chili with a skillet of cornbread on the side. Whichever direction your taste buds are sending you, these ground beef recipes will feed a crowd.

Some of these recipes are takes on classic dishes that swap in grains or vegetarian protein for some of the beef. And even if you’re not a meat eater at all (but have somehow found yourself reading this, a roundup of ground beef recipes), there are still options. Swap in a ground faux meat like Impossible or Beyond, which both make vegan ground “beef” offerings that would work relatively seamlessly in any of these 19 ground beef recipes.

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How to Build a Better Noodle Soup, One Bowl at a Time

Gazing into a brothy noodle bowl always elicits delight, comfort, and anticipation to mix and match the array of textures and flavors within. I always say, especially at this time of year when it is cold out, a steaming bowl feels like the ultimate nou…

Gazing into a brothy noodle bowl always elicits delight, comfort, and anticipation to mix and match the array of textures and flavors within. I always say, especially at this time of year when it is cold out, a steaming bowl feels like the ultimate nourishment.

At a noodle bowl’s foundation is a warming, flavorful broth. Whether doctored up store-bought or homemade, both are legit, especially if you plan to add layers and hues and make your noodle bowl chock-full of eat-the-rainbow, punchy elements. If you go the route of using boxed stock, consider first adding aromatics such as garlic and ginger, chile pepper, or dried mushrooms to infuse the broth for a further hit of umami or zest. Each ingredient helps add more depth of flavor towards the dazzling end result. Think of building a broth you might enjoy drinking as an elixir all on its own (like savory, comforting tea!).

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My Favorite Weeknight Staple Takes Less Than a Minute to Cook

Let’s face it: Some nights are harder than others. I can’t tell you the number of times I’ve saddled up, ready to work at my kitchen counter―sleeves pushed up, hair pulled back―and had a stare down with the cutting board, willing a dinner idea to revea…

Let's face it: Some nights are harder than others. I can't tell you the number of times I've saddled up, ready to work at my kitchen counter―sleeves pushed up, hair pulled back―and had a stare down with the cutting board, willing a dinner idea to reveal itself.

And especially these days, that's fine. I don't have to tell anyone about the importance of keeping a well-stocked pantry, but there are a few specific ingredients that have proven their worth, time and time again. In my kitchen, udon noodles enjoy that MVP status.

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A 2-Ingredient Sauce for Spicy, Creamy Noodles

A Big Little Recipe has the smallest-possible ingredient list and big everything else—flavor, creativity, wow factor. Psst: We don’t count water, salt, black pepper, and certain fats (specifically, 1/2 cup or less of olive oil, vegetable oil, and butte…

A Big Little Recipe has the smallest-possible ingredient list and big everything else—flavor, creativity, wow factor. Psst: We don't count water, salt, black pepper, and certain fats (specifically, 1/2 cup or less of olive oil, vegetable oil, and butter), since we're guessing you have those covered. Today, we’re turning three ingredients into anytime noodles.


If winter is for hot commodities like baked ziti, rendang rigatoni, noodle kugel, and brothy pho, then summer welcomes the opposite—noodle dishes that are exhilaratingly cold, like stepping into an A/C-blasted apartment after trudging through the muggy midday sun.

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Ruth Reichl’s Post-Work Late-Night Noodles

As someone that used to cook but now writes about food for a living, I’m embarrassed to admit that aside from her association with Gourmet, I knew little to nothing about Ruth Reichl. Gourmet, for some reason, always struck me as a bit fussy and inacce…

As someone that used to cook but now writes about food for a living, I’m embarrassed to admit that aside from her association with Gourmet, I knew little to nothing about Ruth Reichl. Gourmet, for some reason, always struck me as a bit fussy and inaccessible—and so, by extension, I mistakenly assumed the same of Reichl’s writing.

In a somewhat meta-fashion, the first chapter—titled “Magic Door”— of Reichl’s just-released memoir Save the Plums, pulled me in, not releasing its hold until I was nearly through. I was surprised by what Reichl and I share in common: We both are only children to older parents, and have revered food magazines and cookbooks from a young age. We cooked anything our curious mothers brought us (her, a whole pig; me, a whole duck), and kept cooking because of the closeness it afforded us with our reserved fathers (“...he rarely talked about himself, and I was afraid if I uttered a single sound he would stop speaking”).

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20-Minute Dinners for When You Don’t Feel Like Cooking

It’s the end of the long workday (or the start of an extra-long week) and we’re hungry. Like, “can’t-think-straight” hungry. Luckily, Food52 contributor EmilyC wants to do all the thinking for us. In Dinner’s Ready, her monthly column on weeknight wond…

It's the end of the long workday (or the start of an extra-long week) and we're hungry. Like, "can't-think-straight" hungry. Luckily, Food52 contributor EmilyC wants to do all the thinking for us. In Dinner's Ready, her monthly column on weeknight wonders, she shares three simple, flavor-packed recipes that are connected by a single idea or ingredient. Stick with Emily, and you'll have a good dinner on the table in no time. Today, Emily shows us what to cook if you don't feel like cooking anything (and still eat well).


Suffice it to say, people everywhere are cooking differently (and most of us more) than ever before. We’re stretching our pantry items, creating meal plans (even if we never relied on them in the past), and stocking and cooking from the depths of our freezers. We’re turning to foods that bring us comfort, whether freshly baked bread, big pots of beans, or cakes that do double duty as dessert and breakfast.

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The Absolute Best Way to Cook Pasta, According to Too Many Tests

Someone buy me a ruler, please.

Photo by Ella Quittner

In Absolute Best Tests, Ella Quittner destroys the sanctity of her home kitchen in the name of the trut…

Someone buy me a ruler, please. Photo by Ella Quittner

In Absolute Best Tests, Ella Quittner destroys the sanctity of her home kitchen in the name of the truth. She's boiled dozens of eggs, mashed a concerning number of potatoes, and seared more Porterhouse steaks than she cares to recall. Today, she tackles pasta.


Nobody likes limp, lifeless pasta.

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The Spicy Noodle Soup You’re Sleeping On

Most people go to Nha Trang One, a tiny Vietnamese restaurant on Baxter Street in New York City, for the steaming bowls of phở. The delicately flavored noodle soup is, after all, Nha Trang One’s most popular dish; owner Andy Ha estimates they sell over…

Most people go to Nha Trang One, a tiny Vietnamese restaurant on Baxter Street in New York City, for the steaming bowls of phở. The delicately flavored noodle soup is, after all, Nha Trang One’s most popular dish; owner Andy Ha estimates they sell over 1,000 bowls weekly.

But instead of lingering over the phở selection, flip to the very end of the six-page menu, where, toward the bottom, you’ll find a soup that’s less lauded, and yet which deserves much of your attention: the mì bò sa tế.

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The Spicy Peanut Noodles That Got Me Through My Move to Beijing

Writer Mandy Lee, whom you might know from her blog, Lady & Pups, is one of our favorite recipe developers and storytellers. In her debut cookbook, The Art of Escapism Cooking: A Survival Story, with Intensely Good Flavors, Mandy shares about her j…

Writer Mandy Lee, whom you might know from her blog, Lady & Pups, is one of our favorite recipe developers and storytellers. In her debut cookbook, The Art of Escapism Cooking: A Survival Story, with Intensely Good Flavors, Mandy shares about her journey moving from New York to Beijing—a new home she didn't really like, but wanted to accept because her husband's job brought her there—and how cooking was the only thing that helped her cope with the transition. The following excerpt (plus, three delicious recipes) from The Art of Escapism Cooking is about the kind of food Mandy loves to cook when she's by herself.


When I first arrived in Beijing, I was blissfully excited. Undeniably, a city cloaked in complicated ancient history, much of which is beautifully mysterious and some of which is evidently dark and savage, should be a pulsating magnet for anyone who is the least bit curious about the world at large, including me. Not to mention my adoration of the foods I found there, which obviously inspired many of the recipes in my cookbook. I swear that I went to Beijing with my best effort at an open heart.

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I Ate My Way Through Bangkok, but This Is the Dish I Can’t Stop Thinking About

It was my first day in Bangkok. I woke up in a jet-lagged haze, but I also had a rumbling tummy, and a voice in my head telling me not to waste any time. I rolled over to pick up my phone and read the many restaurant suggestions my friend and former co…

It was my first day in Bangkok. I woke up in a jet-lagged haze, but I also had a rumbling tummy, and a voice in my head telling me not to waste any time. I rolled over to pick up my phone and read the many restaurant suggestions my friend and former colleague—also a former contestant on “Top Chef Thailand” and now a chef in Bangkok—Steve Doucakis had texted me. One of them was the name Jeh-O Chula, accompanied by an address and a note saying, “You gotta go here.”

Outside, it was pouring rain—a hot and steamy July evening. I ordered a Grab (Thailand’s version of Uber), and headed out for an early dinner by myself. It was just before 6 p.m. when I pulled up to Jeh-O Chula. “How many?” asked a man with a clipboard at the entrance. “Just one,” I replied. I was seated almost immediately.

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