6 Latinx & Asian Pantry Staples This Recipe Developer Swears By

Welcome to Kiera Wright-Ruiz’s Pantry! In each installment of this series, a recipe developer will share with us the pantry items essential to their cooking. This month, we’re exploring six staples stocking Kiera’s kitchen.

Nothing makes me realize …

Welcome to Kiera Wright-Ruiz’s Pantry! In each installment of this series, a recipe developer will share with us the pantry items essential to their cooking. This month, we're exploring six staples stocking Kiera’s kitchen.


Nothing makes me realize how packed my pantry is as when I move. It’s easy to toss everything into a box and (sort of easy to) lug them to the next place. Once, an unopened 35.2-oz jar of Nutella somehow made its way from my San Francisco studio to my new spot in Brooklyn. (What was I supposed to do, just leave it?) But when I moved from New York to Hawaii last year, there was no room for Nutella. I had to do a complete pantry purge. As I laid out every half-used bottle of vinegar and seasoning jar in front of me, I felt like I had been slapped in the face. Did I really need all of this? But as I examined each item closer, memories of why I bought them flooded back.

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Jenn de la Vega Has 4 Separate Pantries (at Least)

Welcome to Jenn de la Vega’s pantry! In each installment of this series, a recipe developer will share with us the pantry items essential to their cooking. This month, we’re exploring seven staples stocking Jenn’s kitchen, which includes Japanese, We…


Welcome to Jenn de la Vega’s pantry! In each installment of this series, a recipe developer will share with us the pantry items essential to their cooking. This month, we're exploring seven staples stocking Jenn’s kitchen, which includes Japanese, West Indian, American Southern, and Filipinx ingredients.


I struggle defining the cuisine that I cook. When confronted, I’ll stammer about being a Filipina from California, and living now in Brooklyn, New York. If you ask what I do, the answer depends on the time of year. From January to June, I’m a recipe developer and cookbook recipe tester. Between August and December, I’m mostly a wedding caterer. I say “mostly” because there might be craft services for an indie flick, food styling for a magazine, or a nonprofit fundraiser dinner. On Tuesdays, I curate the hot dogs at a local bar called Wonderville. We look to video games to inspire the names. My current favorite is called “Pancit! At the Disco Elysium,” an all-beef hot dog with vegan stir-fried noodles and crunchy lumpia chips on top. As a result of all these different jobs, I don’t have just one pantry; I have four.

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7 Indigenous American Pantry Staples This Chef Always Stocks

Welcome to Freddie Bitsoie’s pantry! In each installment of this series, a recipe developer will share with us the pantry items essential to their cooking. This month, we’re exploring seven staples stocking Freddie’s Indigenous American kitchen.

I b…

Welcome to Freddie Bitsoie’s pantry! In each installment of this series, a recipe developer will share with us the pantry items essential to their cooking. This month, we're exploring seven staples stocking Freddie’s Indigenous American kitchen.


I began experimenting in the kitchen when I was a kid. Maybe it was the PBS cooking shows that I loved, or maybe it was boredom that drew me, but I began to cook in secret when my family wasn’t looking. I started out with hamburger patties, working through trial and error—like a culinary detective—to figure out what tasted best. When my mom couldn’t find the chicken that she’d placed in the refrigerator one morning, I didn’t want to tell her that I’d accidentally set it on fire. Eventually I got better at not burning chicken and learned traditional Navajo (Diné) cooking techniques from my grandmother, through my travels, and from people I met on the way.

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Amethyst Ganaway’s Pantry Is Based Around a ‘Holy Trinity of Grains’

Welcome to Amethyst Ganaway’s Pantry! In each installment of this series, a recipe developer will share with us the pantry items essential to their cooking. This month, we’re exploring eight staples stocking Amethyst’s Southern and Low Country kitchen….

Welcome to Amethyst Ganaway’s Pantry! In each installment of this series, a recipe developer will share with us the pantry items essential to their cooking. This month, we're exploring eight staples stocking Amethyst’s Southern and Low Country kitchen.


“Southern food” is often used interchangeably with “soul food,” a term coined before, but most commonly used during and after, the Black Power and Civil Rights movements of the 1960s and 1970s. The term describes the foods and foodways of Black Americans, as well as the reclaiming of African roots. Yet even today, some people still view soul or Southern food through the outdated lens of literal table scraps from white people, or as a lesser cuisine compared to European cultures. For me, the food is about honoring who we are at our core. The history and cultures put into a pot and poured into each bowl are rich, unique stories full of deep, different flavors.

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How the Owner of NYC’s Oldest Specialty Food Store Stocks Her Pantry

Welcome to ​​Christine Sahadi Whelan’s Pantry! In each installment of this series, a recipe developer will share with us the pantry items essential to their cooking. This month, we’re exploring 7 staples stocking ​​Christine’s Middle Eastern kitchen.

Welcome to ​​Christine Sahadi Whelan’s Pantry! In each installment of this series, a recipe developer will share with us the pantry items essential to their cooking. This month, we're exploring 7 staples stocking ​​Christine’s Middle Eastern kitchen.


I grew up in a Lebanese household eating mostly traditional foods prepared by my mother and aunts. My mother, Audrey, always cooks like she’s expecting 600 guests, and several times each year we turn out feasts that would do any Aleppo housewife proud. Likewise, the majority of the foods we prepare and sell at Sahadi’s—New York City’s oldest continually operating specialty food store, owned by my family—have their roots in the classic recipes of Syria and Lebanon, and I love hearing our American-born-and-raised customers casually throwing words like 'fattoush' or 'kibbeh' into conversation as they plan their upcoming parties.

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Jing Gao​​ Thinks Sichuan Flavors Are Ever-Evolving

Welcome to Jing Gao​​’s Pantry! In each installment of this series, a recipe developer will share with us the pantry items essential to their cooking. This month, we’re exploring five staples stocking Jing’s Sichuan kitchen.

Sichuan food is known fo…

Welcome to Jing Gao​​’s Pantry! In each installment of this series, a recipe developer will share with us the pantry items essential to their cooking. This month, we're exploring five staples stocking Jing’s Sichuan kitchen.


Sichuan food is known for its diabolically spicy flavor profiles, bright red bubbling hot pots, and piles of chicken dotted with chili. But like its people, Sichuan flavors are complex and ever-evolving.

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Marisel Salazar Thinks If You Can Eat It, You Can Probably Put Adobo on It

Welcome to Marisel Salazar​​’s Pantry! In each installment of this series, a recipe developer will share with us the pantry items essential to their cooking. This month, we’re exploring 8 staples stocking Marisel’s Panamanian, Cuban, and Japanese kitch…

Welcome to Marisel Salazar​​’s Pantry! In each installment of this series, a recipe developer will share with us the pantry items essential to their cooking. This month, we're exploring 8 staples stocking Marisel’s Panamanian, Cuban, and Japanese kitchen.


When you think of Latin American cuisine, Panama may not jump to your mind; we’re mostly known for the canal, as a financial hub, and for our breathtaking beaches. Our food is a mix of African, Spanish, and indigenous (like the Kuna Indians) techniques, dishes, and ingredients, with rice, beans, and corn as basic staples. Since the country is surrounded on both sides by oceans, we have incredible seafood, tropical fruits, and vegetables. In fact, our unique terroir has contributed to the worldwide popularity of the award-winning Geisha coffee.

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Shannon Sarna Refers to Herself As A Pizza Bagel

I’m a pizza bagel (or a “matzo-rella” stick, depending on your preference), by which I mean I am Italian and Jewish—specifically, Sicilian and Eastern European Ashkenazi—which heavily influences everything I do in the kitchen. Italian- and Jewish-Ameri…

I’m a pizza bagel (or a “matzo-rella” stick, depending on your preference), by which I mean I am Italian and Jewish—specifically, Sicilian and Eastern European Ashkenazi—which heavily influences everything I do in the kitchen. Italian- and Jewish-Americans (and especially those of us from New York) have much in common: guilt, family, tradition, and of course, a passion for food.

While no food writer speaks for an entire culture, it’s important to note that “Jewish food” in particular is not a monolith. My family hails from Poland and Ukraine, which influences my palate and cooking style. And while many Americans are most familiar with Eastern European-inspired Jewish food, the Jewish people have lived in or been exiled to wide-ranging lands all over the world, including Syria, Tunisia, Lithuania, Yemen, Ethiopia, Uzbekistan, Iraq, Iran, and Mexico—just to name a few. Much as I love matzo ball soup, pastrami sandwiches, and babka, there are so many other uniquely Jewish-American dishes, and stories, to tell.

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The 6 Pantry Essentials in My Shanghainese-American Kitchen

Welcome to Betty Liu’s Pantry! In each installment of this series, a recipe developer will share with us the pantry items essential to their cooking. This month, we’re exploring 6 pantry staples stocking Betty’s Shanghainese-American kitchen.

China …

Welcome to Betty Liu’s Pantry! In each installment of this series, a recipe developer will share with us the pantry items essential to their cooking. This month, we're exploring 6 pantry staples stocking Betty’s Shanghainese-American kitchen.


China is a vast country with various geographies, terrains, and climates. As culinary preferences stem from the ingredients available from the land, it is not surprising that cuisines across China vary immensely. When I visit China, I take great joy in discovering and trying other regions’ cuisines, but despite my love for this vast spread of regional cuisines, I keep coming back to the food I grew up with, the food that brings me the most comfort: Jiangnan (江南) cuisine. My family is from this region, and this is the food I grew up eating. My debut cookbook, My Shanghai, is an homage to my family’s cooking—homestyle cooking from the Shanghai region and surrounding areas—and a written record of recipes that had previously been passed down orally. I grew up with the flavors of this region; it is no wonder this has helped shape my pantry, which is unequivocally Shanghainese-American.

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The 4 Basque-Pyrenees Pantry Essentials in My Kitchen

Welcome to Asha Loupy’s Pantry! In each installment of this series, a recipe developer will share with us the pantry items essential to their cooking. This month, we’re exploring four Basque-Pyrenees staples in Asha’s kitchen.

As a longtime home cook,…

Welcome to Asha Loupy’s Pantry! In each installment of this series, a recipe developer will share with us the pantry items essential to their cooking. This month, we're exploring four Basque-Pyrenees staples in Asha’s kitchen.

As a longtime home cook, former grocery buyer for a specialty food shop, and now recipe developer, my pantry remains much more well-traveled than I am—from Malaysian sambal and shrimp paste to Pragati turmeric from Andhra Pradesh, to Spanish extra-virgin olive oil and Basque peppers. The euphoria I was filled with at the first thought of sharing my pantry was quickly replaced by stomach-dropping dread—what region or country was I actually qualified to write about?

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