What You Need to Know About the Latest Recall of McCormick Spices

Salmonella concerns are back, and this time you should check your spice cabinet. You’re used to hearing about recall alerts when it comes to romaine lettuce, salad mixes, baby carrots, and other fresh produce. But less often do you hear about salmonella outbreaks when it comes to dry, packaged goods like spice blends. But it’s 2021 and here we are. On Tuesday, July 27, McCormick announced a voluntary recall of three popular seasoning blends: McCormick Perfect Pinch Italian Seasoning, McCormick Culinary Italian Seasoning, and Frank’s RedHot Buffalo Ranch Seasoning. At this time, no illnesses have been reported in connection to the salmonella outbreak.

“McCormick has alerted customers and grocery outlets to remove the product with the affected date codes from store shelves and distribution centers immediately, and to destroy this product in a manner that would prevent any further consumption,” the company said in a statement. The affected products were shipped to 32 states across the United States, as well as Bermuda and Canada, between June 20th and July 21st.

Read More >>

Salmonella concerns are back, and this time you should check your spice cabinet. You’re used to hearing about recall alerts when it comes to romaine lettuce, salad mixes, baby carrots, and other fresh produce. But less often do you hear about salmonella outbreaks when it comes to dry, packaged goods like spice blends. But it’s 2021 and here we are. On Tuesday, July 27, McCormick announced a voluntary recall of three popular seasoning blends: McCormick Perfect Pinch Italian Seasoning, McCormick Culinary Italian Seasoning, and Frank's RedHot Buffalo Ranch Seasoning. At this time, no illnesses have been reported in connection to the salmonella outbreak.

"McCormick has alerted customers and grocery outlets to remove the product with the affected date codes from store shelves and distribution centers immediately, and to destroy this product in a manner that would prevent any further consumption," the company said in a statement. The affected products were shipped to 32 states across the United States, as well as Bermuda and Canada, between June 20th and July 21st.

Read More >>

These Are the Best Substitutes for Cardamom, Hands Down

Cardamom is a powerful, extra-special spice that can add warmth to savory and sweet dishes alike, from challah and roast poultry, to blondies, hot chocolate, snickerdoodles, and rice pudding. “Think about creative ways to use cardamom and make it a go-…

Cardamom is a powerful, extra-special spice that can add warmth to savory and sweet dishes alike, from challah and roast poultry, to blondies, hot chocolate, snickerdoodles, and rice pudding. “Think about creative ways to use cardamom and make it a go-to spice. It can be a substitute for cinnamon, rather than the other way around,” says Angel Anderson, owner of The Spice Suite in Washington D.C. Ahead, learn all about what makes cardamom unique—and, should you ever run out, the best spice substitutes to use in its place.

What Is Cardamom?

Cardamom is a spice that adds warmth to sweet and savory dishes. There are two types of cardamom seeds that you’ll find in a grocery store or spice shop—green cardamom and black cardamom. Green cardamom is the type that home cooks and bakers are more likely familiar with, but both varieties of this expensive spice have a place in savory and sweet dishes. Because it can be pricey to buy both whole and ground cardamom (Anderson notes that it’s the third most expensive spice in the world), you’re more likely to come across recipes that call for green cardamom, so that’s the best variety to have on hand. “Even if you’re not a baker, you can add ground green cardamom to French toast, pancakes, or biscuits—things that most people make all the time—when you’re tired of cinnamon,” she adds.

Read More >>

Our New Favorite Charoset is from the Biggest Jewish Deli in Texas

Every year, in the days leading up to Passover, Ziggy Gruber makes up to 1,500 pounds of charoset. For comparison, my mom will make no more than a pound of the chopped fruit and nut mix, and there will be some left over. But when has Gruber ever done a…

Every year, in the days leading up to Passover, Ziggy Gruber makes up to 1,500 pounds of charoset. For comparison, my mom will make no more than a pound of the chopped fruit and nut mix, and there will be some left over. But when has Gruber ever done anything on a small scale?

David, who goes by Ziggy, is a third-generation deli man. His grandfather, Max, arrived in New York via Budapest at the turn of the century. He found work in delis across the city until 1927 when he opened his own, the Rialto Deli, with his brothers-in-law. The Rialto, they claim, was the first deli to open its doors on Broadway, just two years before the start of the Great Depression. Amidst the anguish of the era, the Rialto thrived, serving the likes of Ethel Merman and the Marx brothers. All three of them. Decades later, Ziggy’s father opened his own deli, on Madison Avenue and called it Genard’s. Once Ziggy came around, the family had moved, shuttered its prospects in the city, and opened a deli in decidedly quieter Spring Valley, New York.

Read More >>

Madras Curry Powder Is the Versatile Spice Blend You Can (& Should!) Make at Home

Here, Michelle Peters-Jones of The Tiffin Box shows you how to mix your own Madras curry powder and customized spice blends to lend the boost that your recipes have been looking for.
If you go to a grocer in India and ask for curry powder, yo…

Here, Michelle Peters-Jones of The Tiffin Box shows you how to mix your own Madras curry powder and customized spice blends to lend the boost that your recipes have been looking for.

If you go to a grocer in India and ask for curry powder, you’re likely to be asked, "Which one?" There is no such thing as a single "curry powder" in Indian cuisine; each dish has its own combination of spices that makes it unique.

Read More >>

How to Organize Your Spices So You Don’t Lose Your Dang Mind

When I moved back into my house last year after a kitchen renovation, I saw it as the clean slate I needed for every single organization project I had been meaning to get done but never did. What can I say, the years months just got away from me.

I de…

When I moved back into my house last year after a kitchen renovation, I saw it as the clean slate I needed for every single organization project I had been meaning to get done but never did. What can I say, the years months just got away from me.

I decided to start micro, so the first order of business was my spice drawer. Plus, I finally now had a place for them to land. Their home was to be a long drawer, almost 4-feet long, that pulled out of a narrow gap next to the fridge. Uniformity was my end goal so I joyfully threw out all the crack-lidded IKEA jars of powdered cinnamon and red stained bags of annatto and put in a sizable order with my local spice mecca, World Spice Merchants. Order would be mine at last! I fantasized about dozens of perfectly matched jars and hunted around for my label maker, no doubt hiding from me after all these years.

Read More >>

How to Get Turmeric Stains Out of Anything

Home is the place we feel the most like ourselves—where we kick off our shoes, share our meals, and make memories. We’re taking our love for all things home and brining it to Instagram. Follow along at Home52 and make yourselves—well, you know.

So y…

Home is the place we feel the most like ourselves—where we kick off our shoes, share our meals, and make memories. We're taking our love for all things home and brining it to Instagram. Follow along at Home52 and make yourselves—well, you know.


So you made a batch of turmeric tea to chase away a cold and poured the golden mixture into a favorite, pale-colored mug. Or you served turmeric soup in a white bowl, or wiped up a slick of curry with a light dish towel, or peeled fresh turmeric for a smoothie. And now your linens, your dishes, your countertop, and your hands all match your recipe: gold. Fresh or dried and ground, turmeric will stain just about anything, and quickly and stubbornly, but take a deep breath—it's going to be okay.

Read More >>

17 Flavor-Packed Ways to Use Turmeric—Fresh or Ground

If you have a jar of ground turmeric in your spice rack, it’s probably for one of two reasons. One: You cook a lot of cuisines that call for it in their dishes (like Indian, Thai, or Persian, perhaps) and your jar of ground turmeric gets almost a…

If you have a jar of ground turmeric in your spice rack, it’s probably for one of two reasons. One: You cook a lot of cuisines that call for it in their dishes (like Indian, Thai, or Persian, perhaps) and your jar of ground turmeric gets almost as much use as salt. Or, two: You picked up a jar of it ages ago for a recipe that called for a small amount—probably more for color than flavor—and your ground turmeric sees less action than juniper berries

Don’t get me wrong, I like its color-boosting powers, especially in scrambled tofu. It has a lot of value as an all-natural coloring agent: It’s used to color everything from mustard to chicken soup. (You can also use ground turmeric to dye Easter eggs.) 

Read More >>

Homemade Orange Bitters

Bitters are used in a number of cocktails. Even if you can’t strongly perceive them while you’re sipping your drink, like salt, lemon zest, and vanilla, bitters are used to balance the flavors in the glass, providing a gentle undernote to bolster or as a contrast to flavors, rather than domineering or taking center stage. When writing Drinking French* I kept in mind that most…

Bitters are used in a number of cocktails. Even if you can’t strongly perceive them while you’re sipping your drink, like salt, lemon zest, and vanilla, bitters are used to balance the flavors in the glass, providing a gentle undernote to bolster or as a contrast to flavors, rather than domineering or taking center stage.

When writing Drinking French* I kept in mind that most people either didn’t have access to a wide variety of bitters, or didn’t want to amass a line-up of little bottles of bitters at home just to make one cocktail. Although sometimes, a certain bitter does make a difference. So a few times, I nudged readers who might want to expand their flavor horizons towards a particular bitter, such as eucalyptus or salted chocolate. But in the overall picture, I like to give choices when writing a recipe in a book, so as many people ca make it as possible.

My fallback bitters are orange and aromatic (Angostura) because I wanted to make sure to use ones that people could easily find. Heck, I’ve even seen Angostura being sold in French supermarkets, as well as at Target stores in the U.S. So there’s really not that much of a barrier to getting your hands on a bottle.

Continue Reading Homemade Orange Bitters...

Claudia Fleming’s Stout Gingerbread

I could probably name about a dozen people who could be called baking legends. One of them is Claudia Fleming, who was the pastry chef at Gramercy Tavern, and whose book, The Last Course, became a cookbook classic. Claudia was known for desserts that managed to balance seasonal fruits, as well as chocolate, spices, herbs, grains, and even vegetables, not by using fancy techniques, but…

I could probably name about a dozen people who could be called baking legends. One of them is Claudia Fleming, who was the pastry chef at Gramercy Tavern, and whose book, The Last Course, became a cookbook classic.

Claudia was known for desserts that managed to balance seasonal fruits, as well as chocolate, spices, herbs, grains, and even vegetables, not by using fancy techniques, but by presenting them with contrasting or complementary ingredients. The Last Course is a compilation of some of her best desserts, which came out in 2001. (My copy, above, is a first edition and I’m proud to say I was one of the first people to buy it.) As books do, this one eventually sailed out of print and used copies went for steep prices. I held on to mine, resisting offers to sell it. But I’m happy to report that The Last Course is back in print, and available to all.

Continue Reading Claudia Fleming’s Stout Gingerbread...

The $3 Trader Joe’s Product I Can’t Stop Sprinkling on Everything

In the last few months, I’ve formed a somewhat obsessive relationship with a condiment.

I discovered my first jar of dukkah two years ago, on the spice shelves of my local Trader Joe’s—and decided to take it home. The next morning, chancing upon it as…

In the last few months, I’ve formed a somewhat obsessive relationship with a condiment.

I discovered my first jar of dukkah two years ago, on the spice shelves of my local Trader Joe’s—and decided to take it home. The next morning, chancing upon it as I grabbed some salt from the pantry, I sprinkled it onto my assembled avocado toast. The result was revelatory.

Read More >>