Air Fryer Soft Boiled Eggs

Once you learn how to make my air fryer soft boiled eggs, you’ll never want them any other way! It’s completely hands-off, and the results are perfectly cooked eggs with a runny yolk! Need more easy egg recipes? Try my over easy eggs, egg w…

air fryer soft boiled eggs recipe.Once you learn how to make my air fryer soft boiled eggs, you’ll never want them any other way! It’s completely hands-off, and the results are perfectly cooked eggs with a runny yolk! Need more easy egg recipes? Try my over easy eggs, egg white omelette, over medium eggs, and sous vide egg bites next. …

Shakshuka, But Better

Shakshuka (Eggs in Purgatory) is one of those dishes that is so iconic that dozens of cultures claim it as their own. Even knowing this, the most basic recipe (eggs poached in a spiced onion and tomato sauce) was totally underwhelming to me. I found the secret: adding white beans and goat cheese changes everything!…

Shakshuka (Eggs in Purgatory) is one of those dishes that is so iconic that dozens of cultures claim it as their own. Even knowing this, the most basic recipe (eggs poached in a spiced onion and tomato sauce) was totally underwhelming to me. I found the secret: adding white beans and goat cheese changes everything! It brings so much flavor and texture to this simple meal, not to mention protein. I LOVE that I always have the ingredients for this dinner on hand. It’s so easy to throw together! My kids adore it.

cast iron skillet with shakshuka, a piece of toast stuck into it, and red and green onion garnish.
Table of Contents
  1. Eggs in Purgatory? Sounds hellish
  2. What is shakshuka anyway?
  3. Where is it from?
  4. Ingredients for shakshuka recipe
  5. How to make shakshuka
  6. What to serve with shakshuka
  7. How to store leftover shakshuka
  8. Can you freeze Shakshuka?
  9. Shakshuka frequently asked questions
  10. More savory breakfast ideas you’ll love
  11. Shakshuka, But Better Recipe

My son Edison, who is 4, sat me down the other day to do some splainin. “Mom, there are 3 kinds of butts.” Right away I’m thinking, okay, we’ve got bum, booty, tushy, where is this conversation heading?

He elaborates. “There’s butt. Then there’s “but MOM!” and then there’s “but DAD!”

Just as I’m sitting there pondering this incredibly logical conclusion, he assures me “But mom, it’s not that you’re a butt.”

Is this his idea of a compliment?? You know what, at this point I will take what I can get. I just hope he doesn’t convince all the other kids that that’s my actual name. Pretty soon the whole neighborhood will know me as “Butmom.” Not the legacy I had planned for myself.

a hand holding a piece of crusty toast dipping into shakshuka.

Summer is trucking along over here! We showed the kids My Big Fat Greek Wedding the other night, when was the last time you watched that movie?? We were all dying laughing. It’s just so classic. I’ve probably linked to the scene where Aunt Voula offers to make lamb for the vegetarian boyfriend more times than anything else ever on the blog. I’m pretty sure I even referenced it on my very last post for Veggie Sandwiches.

Other than the important work of educating our children on proper 90s rom-coms, we’ve been doing a lot of lazy dinners lately, this Shakshuka at the top of the list!

Eggs in Purgatory? Sounds hellish

Eric started reading a book that he got me for Christmas recently (I hardly ever read books. Because I am the scum of the earth. That’s what you’re thinking, right? Don’t lie.) Anyway, he was reading this fantastic book called Taste by Stanley Tucci, all about how Stanley grew up eating amazing Italian American food. Stanley’s dad would make Shakshuka (“uovo fra’diavolo“) every Friday night. It was tradition for his dad to cook once a week. So, not to be out-dadded, Eric got right in the kitchen to make this for the family.

I wanted to be into it. But it was kind of boring, not gonna lie. Sorry Stanley (sorry Eric 😂). I like tomatoes, but I don’t want to eat what is basically straight up chunky marinara sauce, plus some eggs and bread. If we had the Most Amazing Tomatoes in All the Land then I might feel differently. But we’re working with what we’ve got over here — American canned tomatoes.

shakshuka sauce with one poeached agg getting scopped up by crusty bread.

Then my BFF Sarah (of the famed Chicken Fajitas) told me she makes Shakshuka all the time but adds a can of white beans to the tomatoes. This adds a lot more texture and flavor, not to mention protein. I tried it and am NEVER going back. It is SO good. Every single one of my kids loved this!

The combination of the warm spices with the tomatoes, beans, topped with the perfectly cooked eggs and goat cheese… you guys, it’s so good. I love to serve it with crusty artisan bread, Sarah loves to serve it with some Homemade Naan. Pita bread or Roti would also be good options. You need something to sop up all the saucy goodness.

This is one of my favorite summer meals because it’s stupid fast, and I ALWAYS have the ingredients on hand. (I am barely scraping by with the menu planning over here!) Canned tomatoes, canned beans, eggs, garlic and onion, bread tucked in the freezer. I can handle that. And it’s done in like 30 minutes, tops. Plus super cheap?? And I don’t have to turn on the oven?? It’s made for these crazy busy July days!

The leftovers are also perfect for revamping. If you eat all the eggs and still have sauce left, you can toss it back in the pan on day two or three, crack in more eggs, and you are back where you started. Shakshuka be like the cruse of oil over here.

cast iron skillet with white bean shakshuka and 8 poached eggs, with three slices of toast.

What is shakshuka anyway?

At it’s most basic, shakshuka is tomatoes and onions cooked in warm spices and oil, with a few eggs cracked on top, poaching in the sauce. From there, you can really add whatever you like. The word “shakshouka” is from an Arabic dialect and means “mixed.” I love to add white beans for texture, flavor, and protein.

But you do you. Fancy some mushrooms? Fry them with the onions! Want something green? Add a handful of spinach to the simmering tomatoes! If it’s an ingredient you would add it to an omelette, you can add it to shakshuka.

Where is it from?

Shakshuka originated in northern Africa, and has cultural roots in Tunisia, Libya, Algeria, and Morocco. The recipe got around over time, and is now a super popular dish in several countries, especially Israel (they eat it for breakfast!) You can find versions of it throughout the Middle East, and even parts of Eastern Europe. It’s kind of like how Mexican Wedding Cookies have 1,000 names (Russian Tea Cakes, Snowballs, Polvorones.) Everyone claims shakshuka.

showing half a cast iron skillet with poached eggs in shakshuka sauce with bread on side.

Ingredients for shakshuka recipe

I’ll go out on a limb and guess you already have most of these ingredients at home! Lots of spices, canned tomatoes, canned beans, and eggs. Such an easy pantry meal to make!! Be sure to check the recipe card for full measurements and instructions.

ingredients for shakshuka like canned beans, canned tomatoes, eggs, and more.
  • oil
  • onion
  • paprika
  • smoked paprika
  • cumin
  • oregano
  • crushed red pepper
  • black pepper
  • kosher salt or sea salt
  • garlic
  • crushed or whole tomatoes
  • fire roasted tomatoes
  • cannelini beans
  • fish sauce (optional)
  • eggs
  • cilantro
  • green onions
  • feta or goat cheese

How to make shakshuka

Start by chopping up your onion and smashing and mincing your garlic. I was devastated last night when I made this again for the umpteenth time and was completely out of fresh garlic, something I ALWAYS keep tucked in my panty. So I used the garlic from the jar in the fridge…and guess what. It was amazing.

But, still. If you have time. Smash and mince up some fresh garlic. You just can’t beat it when it comes to aromatics.

top: chopped onion and garlic on wood cutting board, bottom onions browning in pan.

Saute the onion in plenty of olive oil. Plenty, I say! It’s a key component of this simple dish.

top: mix of spices in glass bowl, bottom spice mix dumped on onions in pan.

Mix up all the spices in a little bowl. We’ve got paprika, smoked paprika, oregano, cumin, salt..all the good stuff. I love this mixture. It’s so earthy and warm.

Saute the onions and spices for a couple minutes before you add the garlic.

top: onions and spices all mixed up with garlic dumped on top, bottom tomatoes added in.

Cook the garlic only for about a minute or so before you add the tomatoes and beans. I used crushed tomatoes when I took these photos because it’s what I had on hand, but whole tomatoes are even better.

two 28 ounce cans of tomatoes, organics brand and cento brand, on a wood table

I love the Cento brand of tomatoes. They are expensive but worth every penny. (The are expensive because they are only grown in Italy.) I take a deep dive on the nuances of canned tomatoes in my Bolognese Sauce recipe, if you’re interested! Nerd stuff!!

Now add in the white beans to the tomato mixture. I love navy beans (pictured) or Cannellini beans , which are a little bigger. Both types have the perfect neutral flavor that immediately adopts the flavor of the spices, onions and garlic. And they add such great texture to this dish.

top: beans dumped on top of sauce in pan, bottom all sauce ingredients mixed together.

Now it’s time to simmer, just for a little bit. We want this sauce to cook down and get a little thicker, plus we want to give the flavors time to marry. But honestly, if you’re in a hurry…

8 raw eggs nestled in the top of the sauce ready to be poached.

You just get right on to cracking those eggs in. I’m not there in your kitchen to judge you. Git er done. Don’t forget to sprinkle with a lil salt and pepper.

Cover the pan right away and leave the heat at medium. Let the eggs cook for about 5 minutes, checking on them every now and then until they are as runny or cooked as you like them. Covering the pan makes the eggs cook faster but forms a white film over the yolks. So if you want pretty yellow yolks, leave the lid off and cook a bit longer.

close up of crusty bread scooping into white bean shakshuka and egg.

And voila! That’s it! Now dunk your Naan or Homemade French Bread or Roti and die and go to heaven.

What to serve with shakshuka

The best part about shakshuka is that it is perfect for any meal of the day: breakfast, lunch, or dinner! Your sides can vary depending on when you’re serving it. No matter what, you’ll definitely want something bread-like to scoop up all the saucy-sauce!

ceramic bowl filled with eggs and shakshuka sauce, and crusty pieces of bread surrounding it.

How to store leftover shakshuka

After it has cooled, transfer any leftovers to a tupperware. Tomato sauces tend to stain plastic tupperware, so if you have any glass containers with lids it’s a great option! (If you don’t, spray your plastic tuppers with nonstick spray before adding the tomatoes! #momhack lol)

Make sure your shakshuka has an airtight lid. Stick it in the fridge, and it’ll be good to eat for another 3-4 days! If there is leftover egg, it tastes best within a day or two. To reheat, it’s best to warm it up in a small frying pan on the stove so the egg doesn’t get too hot and overcooked in the microwave. Nobody likes a rubbery egg.

If you plan to eat this over the course of a few days, you can cook just as many eggs as you’ll eat in one sitting and store the remaining sauce. The next meal you want some, warm up the sauce and cook as many eggs you want again fresh for that meal.

Can you freeze Shakshuka?

I definitely do not recommend freezing already cooked eggs. Things get WEIRD, y’all, it’s just not worth it. The sauce and beans, on the other hand, can totally be frozen and will do super well. Put the cooled sauce (NO EGGS) in an appropriately sized ziplock freezer bag, then squeeze out as much air as possible and seal. It’ll last in the freezer for 4-6 months. To reheat, thaw overnight in the refrigerator or on the counter for a few hours. Heat in a pan on the stove, and once hot, follow the instructions in the recipe card for adding and cooking the eggs!

This sauce is super easy to prepare, so it would make a good batch freezer meal. Make a batch or double batch, add single serving size amounts to bags, label, and freeze. Then, anytime the call for shakshuka arises, you’ll have some ready to go!

cast iron skillet filled with shakshuka with white beans and 8 poached eggs.

Shakshuka frequently asked questions

Where does shakshuka come from?

Shakshuka is native to northern Africa. Some say that Tunisia is the birthplace, but the history is a little murky when so many cultures claim it as their own! It’s a staple in Tunisian, Libyan, Moroccan, and Algerian cuisine and very popular through the whole region. It’s so popular, the recipe was carried to the middle east and is very popular in that region as well. There are definitely slight variations depending on where you go, but they all follow the basic format: heavily spiced tomato sauce (often with onions and/or peppers, in this recipe we’re using beans) topped with eggs that get poached in the sauce, and scooped up with bread to eat.

what do you eat shakshuka with?

You can skip the spoon or fork. Grab a naan, pita, or crusty hunk of bread to shovel this goodness into your pie hole. You can channel Katniss from the Hunger Games, when she abandons her silverware after Effie tells her how undignified last year’s tributes were to eat with their hands. 😂
Truly though, shakshuka is traditionally eaten by being scooped up by some kind of bread, almost like a dip. It is the best way!

If you are looking for additional sides to accompany, it will depend on when you are serving it. For breakfast, try serving some baked bacon or sausage alongside, or adding chorizo to the onions for a fun Spanish twist. For lunch or dinner, a nice green or cucumber salad or some grilled chicken would be delicious. Check out the What to serve with Shakshuka section above for more ideas!

what does shakshuka taste like?

Think of a deliciously aromatic tomato sauce, with tons of flavor from all the spices like paprika, cumin, oregano, and red pepper flakes. The sauce cooks down and really deepens all the flavors. So much so, that it should get very thick, almost like a paste. Then we add in beans for even more flavor. In the last stage of cooking, eggs are poached right in the sauce til that perfect runny stage (or whatever stage you like), so all the eggy bits mix with the sauce as you sop it all up with bread. THEN top with goat cheese and fresh herbs. YUM.

white bean shakshuka with dollops of goat cheese over the top and toast pieces along the edge of pan.

More savory breakfast ideas you’ll love

While I will definitely eat this any time of day, technically shakshuka is a breakfast food. Which is great, because sometimes I get sugared out on sweet breakfasts. (Eric and I are always the ones ordering an omelette and French toast and going halfsies.) Check out these savory breakfast recipes!

shakhuka with egg garnished with red onion and a small piece of toast.

Facebook | Pinterest | Instagram

cast iron skillet with shakshuka, a piece of toast stuck into it, and red and green onion garnish.
Print

Shakshuka, But Better

Shakshuka (Eggs in Purgatory) is one of those dishes that is so iconic that dozens of cultures claim it as their own. Even knowing this, the most basic recipe (eggs poached in a spiced onion and tomato sauce) was totally underwhelming to me. I found the secret: adding white beans and goat cheese changes everything! It brings so much flavor and texture to this simple meal, not to mention protein. I LOVE that I always have the ingredients for this dinner on hand. It's so easy to throw together! My kids adore it.
Course Main Course
Cuisine Mediterranean
Prep Time 5 minutes
Cook Time 25 minutes
Total Time 30 minutes
Servings 6
Calories 232kcal

Ingredients

  • 3 tablespoons oil
  • 1 yellow onion chopped
  • 1 tablespoon cumin
  • 1 tablespoon oregano
  • 1 and 1/2 teaspoons paprika
  • 1 and 1/2 teaspoons smoked paprika
  • 1/4 teaspoon crushed red pepper or more if you like it spicy
  • 1/2 teaspoon black pepper plus more for eggs
  • 2 teaspoons kosher salt or sea salt plus more for eggs
  • 5 cloves garlic
  • 1 (28 ounce) can whole tomatoes or crushed tomatoes (Cento brand is best)
  • 1 (14-ounce) can fire roasted diced tomatoes
  • 2 (14-ounce) cans cannellini beans drained
  • 1 teaspoon Chicken Base concentrate*
  • 7 eggs or 6, or 8
  • 6 ounces crumbled goat cheese or feta cheese, add more to taste
  • cilantro chopped
  • green onions chopped
  • shallots sliced, optional
  • crusty bread for serving

Instructions

  • Start by chopping up your garlic and your onions. Smash the 5 garlic cloves with the side of your knife, peel, then mince finely. Set aside. Chop the onion.
  • Set a large 12-inch skillet over medium heat on the stove. When it is hot, add 3 tablespoons olive oil and swirl to coat. Add the onions (not the garlic) to the pan and stir occasionally for about 3 minutes.
  • In a small bowl, combine the spices: 1 tablespoon cumin, 1 tablespoon oregano, 1 and 1/2 teaspoons paprika, 1 and 1/2 teaspoons smoked paprika, 1/4 teaspoon crushed red pepper, 1/2 teaspoon black pepper, and 2 teaspoons kosher salt. Add the spices to the onions and continue cooking for 2-4 minutes, until the onions are tender and the spices are toasted (add a bit more oil if it starts to stick.)
  • Add the minced garlic and saute for 1 minute, until fragrant.
  • Add all the cans: 1 (28-ounce) can whole tomatoes. 1 can diced tomatoes. Use a fork to smash the whole tomatoes into smaller pieces. Drain the 2 cans of white beans, and add to the tomatoes.
  • Stir the sauce together, and add 1 teaspoon Chicken Base.*
  • Let this mixture simmer over medium heat for 5-10 minutes, the longer the better. The goal is to let the flavors meld together, and for the sauce to thicken. If you only have a couple minutes that's fine.
  • Crack the eggs into the tomatoes one at a time. Make sure to space them out as best you can, but if they run into each other it's okay. Sprinkle the top of each egg with salt and pepper.
  • Cover the pan with a lid.** Cook the eggs without disturbing for about 5 minutes. Lift the lid and use a spoon to nudge the yolks. If they are pretty soft still, cover again and wait another couple minutes. Keep in mind that the eggs will cook a little bit even after you take them off the heat (especially if you keep the lid on.) So if you love runny eggs, take them off sooner than you think.
  • Crumble 6 ounces goat cheese (or feta). (I used the same bowl I mixed the spices in). Sprinkle the cheese over the eggs and sauce and let it melt a little bit.
  • Chop cilantro and green onions and sprinkle over the top just before serving. You could also try parsley (or even dill or basil), if you're one of those cilantro-is-dirt people.
  • Serve Shakshuka with crusty artisan bread from the store. I actually really love the Costco Country French loaves. Or if you really want to fancy it up, make homemade Naan or Homemade French Bread or Roti and die and go to heaven.
  • Storage: Transfer leftovers to a tupperware with a tight lid. Stick it in the fridge, and it'll be good to eat for 3-4 days! If there is leftover egg, it tastes best within a day or two. To reheat, it's best to warm it up in a small frying pan on the stove so the egg doesn't get too hot and overcooked in the microwave. Nobody likes a rubbery egg.
    If you plan to eat this over the course of a few days, cook just as many eggs as you'll eat in one sitting, then store the remaining sauce. The next meal you want some, warm up the sauce in a pan, and cook as many eggs you want again fresh for that meal.

Notes

*I like Better Than Bouillon Chicken Base, or Zoup Chicken Base is another excellent brand that just started making a competitive product (I like and use them both).
Technically this chicken base is an optional ingredient, but I’m telling you, it majorly amps up the flavor of the tomato sauce. It adds the perfect umami flavor without having to wait as long for the tomatoes to cook. Obviously it makes it not vegetarian, so if that’s an issue, sub with a teaspoon of soy sauce. Or 1 teaspoon Anchovy Paste or Fish Sauce would be great substitutes too. 
**Covering the pan: If you cover the pan, your egg yolks will turn white on top. This is totally fine, but if you want yellow yolks, leave the lid off and just cook a few minutes longer, it might even take up to 10-15 minutes without a lid. Keep an eye on it!

Nutrition

Calories: 232kcal | Carbohydrates: 5g | Protein: 13g | Fat: 18g | Saturated Fat: 6g | Polyunsaturated Fat: 3g | Monounsaturated Fat: 8g | Trans Fat: 0.05g | Cholesterol: 204mg | Sodium: 1038mg | Potassium: 172mg | Fiber: 1g | Sugar: 1g | Vitamin A: 1117IU | Vitamin C: 2mg | Calcium: 104mg | Iron: 3mg

Homemade Hash Browns

These homemade hash browns are golden brown and crispy on the outside yet fluffy in the center. Made with simple ingredients, I love how freezer-friendly they are! Craving more savory breakfast recipes? Try my air fryer turkey bacon, savory pancakes, e…

hash brown recipe.These homemade hash browns are golden brown and crispy on the outside yet fluffy in the center. Made with simple ingredients, I love how freezer-friendly they are! Craving more savory breakfast recipes? Try my air fryer turkey bacon, savory pancakes, egg white omelette, and Starbucks spinach feta wrap next. Growing up, I was obsessed with…

Sausage McMuffin

This copycat sausage McMuffin recipe features a toasted English muffin topped with a perfectly cooked egg, savory breakfast sausage, and melty cheese. Only 4 ingredients needed! Keen on more McDonald’s copycat recipes? Try my Big Mac salad, spicy…

sausage mcmuffin recipe.This copycat sausage McMuffin recipe features a toasted English muffin topped with a perfectly cooked egg, savory breakfast sausage, and melty cheese. Only 4 ingredients needed! Keen on more McDonald’s copycat recipes? Try my Big Mac salad, spicy chicken sandwich, Big Mac sauce, and crispy hash browns next. Unpopular opinion: McDonald’s breakfast menu is far…

Over Easy Eggs

Learn how to make over easy eggs featuring cooked egg whites and runny yolks. My step-by-step tutorial guarantees perfectly cooked eggs every time! Looking for the perfect egg recipe? Try my over-medium eggs, over-hard eggs, egg white omelette, or sous…

over easy eggs.Learn how to make over easy eggs featuring cooked egg whites and runny yolks. My step-by-step tutorial guarantees perfectly cooked eggs every time! Looking for the perfect egg recipe? Try my over-medium eggs, over-hard eggs, egg white omelette, or sous vide egg bites next. Everyone has their favorite way of cooking eggs, but I reckon…

Over Medium Eggs

Learn how to make perfect over medium eggs with my tried and tested method. Ready in just 3 minutes, they seriously taste like the ones you’d find at any good cafe or restaurant. If you love your eggs like I do, add my over hard eggs, over easy e…

over medium eggs.Learn how to make perfect over medium eggs with my tried and tested method. Ready in just 3 minutes, they seriously taste like the ones you’d find at any good cafe or restaurant. If you love your eggs like I do, add my over hard eggs, over easy eggs, air fryer soft boiled eggs, and…

Air Fryer Turkey Bacon

Learn how to make turkey bacon in the air fryer in under 5 minutes! It’s fast and easy and yields crispy and crunchy bacon every single time. Love cooking turkey in the air fryer? Try my air fryer turkey breast, air fryer turkey meatballs, and ai…

air fryer turkey bacon recipe.Learn how to make turkey bacon in the air fryer in under 5 minutes! It’s fast and easy and yields crispy and crunchy bacon every single time. Love cooking turkey in the air fryer? Try my air fryer turkey breast, air fryer turkey meatballs, and air fryer turkey burgers next. As much as I love…

Vegan Breakfast Burritos

square image of a close up vegan breakfast burrito with eggy mixture and potato veggiesDelicious and easy to make Vegan Breakfast Burritos are loaded with tofu scramble, vegan queso and easy potato veggie hash. They freeze perfectly for quick and filling weekday morning breakfasts! Want more savory vegan breakfast ideas? Try my Vegan Breakfast Sandwiches (freezer friendly), The Best Tofu Scramble and JUST Egg Omelette. There isn’t usually time…

square image of a close up vegan breakfast burrito with eggy mixture and potato veggies

Delicious and easy to make Vegan Breakfast Burritos are loaded with tofu scramble, vegan queso and easy potato veggie hash. They freeze perfectly for quick and filling weekday morning breakfasts!

Want more savory vegan breakfast ideas? Try my Vegan Breakfast Sandwiches (freezer friendly), The Best Tofu Scramble and JUST Egg Omelette.

burrito cut in half with foil around it on wood board with eggy mixture plus veggies

There isn’t usually time for fluffy pancakes or vegan omelettes during busy weekday mornings. We need a meal or snack that is filling, nutritious and full of flavor to grab and head out the door.

If you’re in the mood for something savory, try these Vegan Breakfast Burritos. They’re made with filling ingredients like eggy tofu scramble mixed with an incredible vegan queso, and breakfast hash with potatoes and beans.

Breakfast burritos are the best option to enjoy when you need a change from your usual overnight oats or green smoothies. Warm, savory, and satisfying, this protein-packed breakfast will keep you full for hours. 

How to make vegan breakfast burritos

Find the complete recipe with measurements in the recipe card below.

First, make the super easy vegan queso in your blender. Set aside while you make the hash.

For the breakfast hash, all you need to do is warm oil in a large skillet and add the potatoes (I used a combination of sweet and yellow). Stir to coat in the oil, sprinkle with salt and pepper, cover and cook for about 10 minutes.

Uncover and add the red pepper and cook for another 15 minutes, until the potatoes and cooked and golden. Lastly, add the garlic, cook for a minute, then remove from heat and stir in the drained and rinsed beans.

breakfast hash in pan with sweet and regular potatoes, red pepper and beans

Next, make the easy tofu scramble. Stir the delicious queso into the tofu scramble. YUM.

Lastly, assemble the burritos by laying a large tortilla flat. Add some of the tofu-queso mixture, followed by the hash. You can add anything else you want, like avocado slices, vegan sour cream, pico de gallo, cilantro or hot sauce, but I keep them simple for freezing.

Fold the sides over the filling and roll up, tucking the edges as you go.

tortilla on wood board with veggie potato beans and eggy mixture

Frequently Asked Questions

Do breakfast burritos freeze well?

Yes, that’s my favorite thing about this recipe. Wrap each one in foil or other wrap and place in a freezer friendly bag or container. Freeze for up to 3 months.

What is the best way to reheat frozen breakfast burritos?

Since I’m usually in a hurry, I just wrap in a paper towel and microwave them for 1 minute, then flip and microwave for 1-2 more minutes, until warm in the middle.

You can also bake at 350 degrees F wrapped in foil in the oven for about 20-30 minutes.

How do I prevent a soggy burrito?

Don’t add a lot of liquid in the filling, like watery salsa, especially if freezing. Make sure your tofu scramble isn’t super watery; cook the water from the tofu off, then mix in the queso.

What else can I add to vegan breakfast burritos?

Pickled red onions, tempeh bacon, vegan sausage, chorizo, vegan sour cream, pico de gallo, hot sauce, cilantro and/or avocado.

yellow eggy looking mixture in vegan breakfast burrito, a hand holding a cut in half burrito
square image of a close up vegan breakfast burrito with eggy mixture and potato veggies
Print

Vegan Breakfast Burritos

Delicious and easy to make Vegan Breakfast Burritos are loaded with tofu scramble, vegan queso and easy potato veggie hash. They freeze perfectly for quick and filling weekday morning breakfasts!
Course Breakfast
Cuisine American, Mexican
Prep Time 20 minutes
Cook Time 30 minutes
Total Time 50 minutes
Servings 8 burritos
Calories 476kcal

Ingredients

Queso

  • 1 1/2 cups raw cashews
  • 3/4 cup medium chunky salsa
  • 1/4 cup pickled jalapeños
  • 1/4 cup juice from pickled jalapeño jar
  • 1/4 cup nutritional yeast
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt

Hash

  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 2 medium russet potatoes peeled and diced small
  • 2 medium sweet potatoes peeled and diced small
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon black pepper
  • 1 medium red bell pepper seeded and diced
  • 3 large garlic cloves minced
  • 15 ounce can pinto beans drained and rinsed

Tofu Scramble

The Rest

  • 8 large tortillas
  • optional hot sauce, avocado, pico de gallo, cilantro

Instructions

Make the queso

  • Soak the cashews: Bring 3-4 cups of water to a boil (I use my tea kettle). Pour the hot water over the cashews and let soak for 5 minutes or up to an hour.
  • Blend: Drain the cashews, discard the soaking water and add to a high powered blender. Add the salsa, jalapeños and the juices, nutritional yeast and salt and blend until very smooth. Scrape down the sides of the blender if needed. Set aside.

Make the hash

  • Warm the oil over medium heat in a large nonstick skillet. Add the potatoes and toss them to coat with oil, sprinkle with salt and pepper, then place a lid on the pan and cook for 10 minutes.
  • Remove the lid and increase the heat to medium-high. Add the red bell pepper and cook for another 15 minutes or so, stirring occasionally, until the potatoes are cooked and golden brown.
  • Lower the heat to medium and add the garlic and cook for 1-2 more minutes, stirring so it doesn't burn. Remove from heat and stir in the beans.

Make the tofu scramble

  • Heat a tablespoon of olive oil in a skillet over medium heat. Remove the tofu from the package and drain the water. Crumble the tofu into the pan with your hands then cook, stirring frequently, for 3-4 minutes until the water from the tofu is mostly gone.
  • Add the nutritional yeast, black salt and turmeric and stir into the tofu. Cook for 5-10 minutes.
  • Remove from heat. Pour the queso into the pan with the tofu scramble and stir.

Assemble the burritos

  • Place a tortilla flat. Add some tofu scramble with queso, followed by a generous serving of the hash. Add hot sauce, cilantro, tomatoes or anything else you like (but avoid adding anything more if freezing).
  • Fold the sides of the tortilla over the filling, then roll, tucking the edges as you go.
  • If desired, coat a pan with oil and pan fry the burritos on each side until golden brown, about 3 minutes on each side.
  • Serve immediately, or wrap each one tightly in foil or other wrap and freeze. To reheat a frozen burrito, wrap in foil and warm in the oven at 350 degrees F for 20-30 minutes, or microwave for about 2-3 minutes flipping halfway through, until warm.

Notes

  1. Gluten free – Use a large gluten free tortilla.
  2. Lower sodium – To keep these lower in sodium, use salt free canned beans, and don’t add as much salt to the queso, hash or tofu scramble. 
  3. Soy free – Use scrambled JUST Egg instead of tofu, or chickpea scramble.

Nutrition

Serving: 1of 8 burritos | Calories: 476kcal | Carbohydrates: 57g | Protein: 18g | Fat: 21g | Saturated Fat: 4g | Polyunsaturated Fat: 5g | Monounsaturated Fat: 11g | Sodium: 1115mg | Potassium: 932mg | Fiber: 9g | Sugar: 8g | Vitamin A: 8672IU | Vitamin C: 25mg | Calcium: 178mg | Iron: 5mg

Truly The Best Crepes I’ve Ever Had

The best crepes of your life…and I’ve been to France, guys. Homemade is best! This crepe recipe is truly my favorite! Crepes are kind of like a pancake in that they are flat and you put toppings on them, but really the comparison ends there. They are impossibly thin but not at all crispy. The…

The best crepes of your life…and I’ve been to France, guys. Homemade is best! This crepe recipe is truly my favorite! Crepes are kind of like a pancake in that they are flat and you put toppings on them, but really the comparison ends there. They are impossibly thin but not at all crispy. The are flexible and velvety. They are so buttery and golden, they will make you cry into your strawberries and cream. I’ll show you exactly how to make crepes, step by step! SO easy.

ceramic plate filled with several crepes topped with strawberry topping and powdered sugar.
Table of Contents
  1. The absolute best crepes you will ever have
  2. What is the secret of a good crepe?
  3. Crêpes au Citron (Lemon Sugar Crepes)
  4. Do you need a special pan for crepes?
  5. What is a crepe made of?
  6. Crepe recipe ingredients
  7. How to make crepes
  8. Filling ideas for crepes recipe
  9. Savory crepe fillings
  10. What to serve with crepes
  11. How to store leftover crepes
  12. Can you store crepe batter?
  13. Can you freeze crepes?
  14. Frequently asked questions for crepes
  15. More amazing breakfast ideas
  16. Truly The Best Crepes I’ve Ever Had Recipe

When I was 15 and my brother was 17, my parents went on a trip to Italy without us. It was summertime and we were busy with our lifeguarding jobs (and ok fine, we weren’t invited. Don’t worry I’m not bitter.)

Mom and Dad left us with a wad of cash that was our “Emergency Money.” No discussions were had about what exactly constituted an emergency. We were pretty good kids, though. They knew we weren’t going to be throwing any crazy parties.

But, I mean, we were teenagers. Not exactly above temptation. On the way home from the pool one afternoon, we saw him: the strawberry man. If you’ve ever been to California in the summer, you know what I’m talking about.

The strawberry sellers start popping up every spring (the first one just hit the streets in my neighborhood this week. I practically tripped in my rush to find some cash). The fun part is that you never know exactly what corner they will be on, or how long they will be there, so you have to act fast.

huge stack of quarter folded crepes with strawberries on the side.

I can’t tell you the number of times my mom would be driving calmly down the road when BOOM she saw it, and suddenly the car has veered off the side of the road, ready to be loaded with an entire flat of the biggest, juiciest, reddest strawberries you ever laid eyes on. Strawberry haze hits lightning fast.

This exact thing happened to my brother Nathan and I. When we saw the strawberry man, our pupils were replaced with little tiny strawberries, and we rushed home to get the “Emergency Money” because by golly THIS WAS AN EMERGENCY. We bought $40 worth of strawberries (because apparently we needed an entire flat of 10 pounds of strawberries for each of us??)

We came home and made these crepes. Sooooo many crepes. With strawberries inside, strawberries on top, strawberries on the side, and some strawberry jam and soft cream cheese for good measure.

All these years later and I can still taste them. I’ve done my best to recreate what we had that day, but I don’t know if I will ever be able to match the vibe of a teenage summer day with a best friend and Emergency Money and no responsibilities, no schedule, and more strawberry crepes than anyone could possibly eat.

several folded crepes topped with powdered sugar and a ladle of macerated strawberries.

The absolute best crepes you will ever have

My mom has been making crepes her whole life and is a pro. I took her recipe and compared it with dozens of others, and paid special attention to Julia Child’s recipes (because you know, it’s Julia). Hers were a little fussy in my opinion (do we REALLY need to let the batter rest overnight? Read: NO.)

I’ve landed on my go-to crepe-for-all-occasions that is

  • easy and FAST to make
  • has incredible flavor (thank u butter 🥹)
  • is sturdy enough to NOT tear constantly (while still being incredibly delicate) and
  • can be adapted for both sweet AND savory fillings.

I know you think of dessert when you think of crepes but DO NOT underestimate the amazingness of a savory crepe. I grew up eating my mother’s Chicken Crepes, which are kind of like enchiladas, EXCEPT MADE WITH CREPES (you dump straight-up cream on top and add Pepper jack cheese, and you might die and go to heaven, literally, from all the artery clogging that’s going on, but by golly you will die happy.)

crepes filled burrito style with cream cheese spread and fresh mixed berries.

What is the secret of a good crepe?

  • Use butter in the batter. Many crepe recipes don’t call for butter, but it adds fat and flavor to the final crepe, making them unbelievably golden and the perfect texture.
  • Use a blender to get your crepe batter mixed really well, lightning fast.
  • Don’t cook in too big of a pan. An 8-inch pan is perfect.
  • Don’t overcook the crepes. They should be soft and pliable, not too brown, and certainly not so crisp that they hold a flat shape when you lift them up. They should be floppy and annoyingly difficult to flip, because they are so soft and tender.
hand holding a crepe and showing a pliable and thin it is, without falling apart.

These are the kind of crepes that are dangerous, because once you taste one that you have freshly cooked, eating it right out of the pan, you might never even get to the topping part. They are good just by themselves, the hotter and fresher the better.

Crepes are not hard to make, but there are some particular techniques you need to know to get the flipping part right. Crepes that are too thick (when you pour too much batter into the pan) are not the right texture. You want to pour them as thin as humanly possible, which can get a little dicey when you have to use a spatula to flip it 30 seconds later.

Rips and tears happen, especially when you’re first starting out. Crepe pouring, swirling, and flipping takes some practice. The trick is to just eat the first few that you mess up, right out of the pan, before anyone notices, then you can just present the perfect ones to your family or guests and they will never know. Follow me for more kitchen tips and tricks! 😂

Crêpes au Citron (Lemon Sugar Crepes)

When I was in college, I met a friend (hi Robert!) who had lived in France for 2 years serving a mission for our church. He was always talking about how amazing the crepes were, so we decided to make some together. He changed my crepe life forever that day by dumping straight up sugar directly on the crepe, squeezing a lemon over the top, and folding. It’s called Crêpes Citron Sucre and it has become my absolute FAVORITE. So bright and citrusy!

top spoon pouring sugar on a crepe, bottom squeezing juice from a lemon over both.

When I traveled to France over 10 years later, I remembered the Lemon Sugar Crepes and was determined to try them the first chance I got. The first evening in Paris, we were at the Eiffel tower and saw a food truck selling crepes. French street food! What could be better!

We rushed over and ordered lemon crepes. The guy poured the batter in the pan, used his fancy T-tool to spread out the batter, and moments later a fresh, real-French crepe was being laid on a plate. He sprinkled it with some sugar and then…reached over to a yellow squeeze bottle and squirted FAKE LEMON JUICE all over my precious crepe.

3 rolled up crepes with lemon juice and sugar rolled into each.

I mean, I’m not saying I didn’t have ANY decent crepes in France, but that experience taught me that man, sometimes if you want to get something done right, you gotta do it yourself. I promise, today’s recipe will match the best crepes you can find in France!

Do you need a special pan for crepes?

No ma’am! I like to use an 8-inch frying pan. And about that fancy T-tool I mentioned that the French guy used: you do not need one. I bought one in France because I think they are so cute (I display it in my kitchen) but this tool is meant to be used with a professional enormous crepe pan that is perfectly flat (no edge at all). They drag the top part of the T over the batter after it’s poured, to make sure it’s ultra thin. But it’s not really useful for a pan that has any kind of lip on the edge, which is what you and I are working with. Don’t fret, I promise you can get super thin crepes without the pan or the T-tool. You just need to practice. It’s all in the wrist. 😉

ceramic plate topped with strawberries and multiple crepes folded into quarters.

What is a crepe made of?

A crepe is made from very simple ingredients: flour, sugar, salt, milk, eggs, vanilla, and butter. The trick is getting the quantities of each just right. I tried it a bunch of different ways to get my recipe to buttery-velvety-perfection (so you don’t have to!)

Like I mentioned, the method for cooking crepes requires some solid technique to get a crepe that’s ultra thin and flexible, and not a crispy mess. I will show you everything in the how to section below!

Crepe recipe ingredients

I bet you have just about every ingredient you need to make these crepes right now! Such a simple recipe with mostly pantry ingredients. The full ingredient amounts and instructions are in the recipe card.

For the crepes

  • whole milk. Really. Don’t use low fat milk
  • large eggs
  • vanilla
  • flour

For the filling

  • cream cheese
  • powdered sugar
  • strawberries

How to make crepes

Add all the ingredients (except the butter) to a blender, starting with the milk and eggs. This makes it easier on your blender.

milk being poured from a measuring cup into a blender that already has eggs in it.

We are using an entire tablespoon of vanilla in these babies. Bring on the flavor!!

top pouring vanilla into the blender, bottom blender from the side showing ingredients to blend.

Dump the flour and salt on top, then blend away. Once it has come together, open the top spout and pour in your melted butter, with the blender on low.

top adding melted butter to the blender while it runs on low, bottom all blended and ready.

And voila! That’s seriously it. It takes 5 minutes to whip this up. You can put a lid on this and keep it in the fridge for a few days if you like! Whisk (or blend again) before using, adding a little milk if it’s thick.

Now it’s time to cook. You can start cooking these right away, the batter does not need to rest.

Set a stick of butter by the stove and heat up your 8 inch pan.

hand holding knife with butter on it and a measuring cup with batter in it on counter.

Dunk a 1/4 cup measuring cup right into the blender, you don’t need to fill it all the way. 1/4 cup is 4 tablespoons. So anywhere between 3-4 tablespoons of batter is what you want.

Add about 1-2 teaspoons butter to the pan and swirl it around to melt. My pan was hot enough that it browned the butter right away, this is fine. You can turn the heat down if you aren’t into browned butter (weirdo. I’m judging you.)

butter browning in a white frying pan, then adding crepes batter to the pan.

Then dump your batter in all at once. Immediately lift the pan with your other hand and start turning.

pouring batter into a frying ban coated with butter, then swirling the pan.

You want to keep the pan moving constantly to create a VERY thin layer of batter on the bottom of the pan, in as close to a large-circle shape as you can manage.

spreading crepe batter in a white frying pan, tilting pan.

You might think it’s time to stop tilting now, but not for me. I despise thick crepes. Don’t stop tilting the pan until the batter no longer drips.

tilting a white frying pan to make batter into a crepe.

This might mean that you don’t end up with a perfect circle. That’s ok! Add in a couple drops of batter in the empty spots to fill it in. Or, scrape off the edges that are uneven if that’s easier.

crepe batter perfectly spread out in a white pan.

See? Now we’re cookin. A perfect circle. Even when I tilt the pan all the way up, the batter won’t drip around at this point. Wait just a moment longer…until the batter no longer looks shiny on top, like the photo below. As soon as it starts to look matte, or a little bit dried, it’s time to flip. Can you see the difference?

final crepe in a pan, ready to be flipped. Then a flipped browned crepe.

Then shove a spatula underneath as far as you can, and flip.

I can’t believe I don’t have a better photo of a flipped crepe in the pan. Look at this poor guy, he’s all mushed! That’s kind of the deal with crepes though, they are not always perfect, and that’s okay. They still taste amazing. If we had the fancy pan and crepe-T-tool, they would look better. But I promise, these taste great and the texture is perfect.

You would not believe how many times I made Eric help me take these process photos. We probably shot the swirling technique for about 10 crepes, with me taking a thousand photos each time. It’s kind of hard to capture this process in photos, even with a buddy! At least for me, ha, I’m no pro.

We don’t have enough light for photos by our stove, so we would heat the heck out the pan, walk all the way over into the other room by the window, and pour the batter in, doing the swirling over the wood board photo backdrop that you can see underneath. Don’t be like us. Stay right by your stove 😂

Crepes on a plate with strawberries in a bowl on the side with a blue stripe napkin.

My one plea: do NOT over cook your crepes. You want them to just be barely browned, or not at all, depending on what you like. But if you have gotten to the point that the crepe has enough structure to stay flat as you flip them, then you have cooked too long. They should be floppy flexible.

crepes stacked on a white plate, then folded over by someone's hand.

You can see this one has spots that are a little too dark. It’s no biggie you guys. You better believe I still ate the heck out of that crepe. It’s just a little darker and crisper than is ideal.

Okay! Now it’s time to fill our crepes!! The best part!

Add some soft cream cheese and powdered sugar to a mixing bowl and beat it up.

top cream cheese and powdered sugar in mixing bowl, bottom all mixed together smoothly.

Add in some vanilla and a lil salt. Then spread some down the middle of your crepe…

top crepe topped with cream cheese mixture, bottom strawberries added to top.

And top with your strawberry filling. I have a simple recipe for macerated strawberries below, but if you want to take it even one step further, try my recipe for Fresh Strawberry Topping. It’s the same strawberry recipe I put on Strawberry Shortcakes, and it’s unbelievably juicy and fresh.

crepe on a plate topped with mixed berries and a drizzle of the cream cheese spread.

Or you could go with simple mixed berries and cream cheese. It’s really hard to go wrong at this point?? Just look around your kitchen, you will find something to fill your crepes with.

Often with leftovers the next morning, I spread crepes with peanut butter and sprinkle with sugar, for a little protein. My kids love it! ↓ here are some more ideas:

Filling ideas for crepes recipe

I’m pretty sure the options are limitless! Think of any kind of food you like, and put it in a deliciously thin buttery wrap and voila, a new kind of crepe is born. My family likes to have everything served buffet style and everyone gets to choose and mix whatever fillings they like to make various concoctions. Here’s a short list of the MANY possibilities:

Sweet crepe fillings

Savory crepe fillings

What to serve with crepes

You can make your crepes (and all their fillings) the whole show, or you can round out the meal with some additional menu items. Between making the crepes themselves and the filling, having crepes for a meal can be a labor of love so if I have sides I keep them very simple. If I am making crepes with a sweet filling, I go for savory sides and of course do sweeter sides with savory crepes. Here are some ideas!

large stack of fresh folded crepes topped with powdered sugar and strawberries on the side.

How to store leftover crepes

Crepes are actually quite simple to store! First, make sure they cool completely, otherwise the heat will turn into condensation and the crepes will get soggy. Some people like to separate each crepe in a stack with wax or parchment paper, but I find it unnecessary. Just stack them up on a plate and cover with plastic wrap.

If you plan to store them for a couple days, keep them in a gallon size ziplock bag, squeezing out as much air as possible before sealing. The seal on the bag helps keep the crepes moist. You can also store them in an airtight container, but I don’t have one big enough to keep them flat, which I prefer. They will stay good in the refrigerator for 2-3 days.

To reheat, put a nonstick skillet over medium heat. Once it’s hot, add each crepe individually and warm on each side for 30-60 seconds. Remove to a plate, add your fillings, and you’re good to go! If you are adding a savory filling, be sure to warm the filling up separately in the microwave before adding to the hot crepe.

Can you store crepe batter?

Crepe batter is great for making ahead of time. Store the batter in a sealed container in the fridge for 2-3 days. Stir well before cooking. If after making the first crepe, you feel the batter is too thick, add milk to the batter 1 tablespoon at a time.

Can you freeze crepes?

Crepes are a great candidate for freezing, so make a big stack and thank yourself in the future! To freeze, first make sure the crepes are completely cooled. You can add parchment paper between each one (or skip it, honestly they never stick for me), then add the whole stack to a gallon size ziplock freezer bag and squeeze all the air out before sealing.

To eat them after freezing, let the bag sit on the counter for an hour or two (or in the fridge overnight) until they are pliable enough to separate. Add one crepe at a time to a skillet over medium heat and warm for about 30 seconds to a minute until the crepe is totally heated through.

close up of a crepe stuffed with cream cheese spread and strawberry topping.

Frequently asked questions for crepes

What is a crepe?

A crepe is kind of like a large, flat pancake. The ingredients are very similar: milk, eggs, flour, vanilla, butter, etc. But in a crepe, more liquid is added and there is little or no leavening so it has no rise. This makes for an ultra thin, but ultra pliable and soft crepe.

What are the ingredients for crepes?

You’ll find that while there is some variation, most crepes follow the same recipe pattern. This recipe uses whole milk, large eggs, vanilla, flour, sugar, kosher salt, and butter.

Is crepe batter the same as pancake batter?

No sir! Pancakes and crepes are similar in that they are round, sweet breakfast items. But pancake batter is thicker and contains a leavening agent to make them rise so they’re nice and thick and fluffy. Crepe batter looks thin and runny in comparison; there is much more liquid added, and no leavening, making the cooked crepe extremely thin and delicate.

why are crepes healthier than pancakes?

Crepes by themselves end up being healthier than pancakes because they are just so much thinner, there’s literally less volume. That being said, I know I end up adding WAY more filling to my crepes than on top of my pancakes so in the end the calories may be a wash. If you’re looking to limit calories (something I personally have no interest in when making crepes 😂), you’ll really want to pay the most attention to what you use for a filling.

More amazing breakfast ideas

I’m pretty sure delicious breakfast foods are a love language. Forget sweet nothings, give me a sweet crepe or an incredible breakfast casserole! Here are some of my favorites.

Facebook | Pinterest | Instagram

ceramic plate filled with several crepes topped with strawberry topping and powdered sugar.
Print

Truly The Best Crepes I’ve Ever Had

The best crepes of your life…and I've been to France, guys. Homemade is best! This crepe recipe is truly my favorite! Crepes are kind of like a pancake in that they are flat and you put toppings on them, but really the comparison ends there. They are impossibly thin but not at all crispy. The are flexible and velvety. They are so buttery and golden, they will make you cry into your strawberries and cream. I'll show you exactly how to make crepes, step by step! SO easy.
Course Breakfast
Cuisine American, French
Prep Time 5 minutes
Cook Time 20 minutes
Total Time 25 minutes
Servings 18
Calories 235kcal

Ingredients

For the crepes:

  • 2 cups whole milk don't use low fat milk*
  • 4 large eggs
  • 3 tablespoons sugar see notes for savory crepes
  • 1 tablespoon vanilla see notes for savory crepes
  • 1 and 1/2 cups flour spooned and leveled
  • 3/4 teaspoon kosher salt
  • 1/4 cup butter melted (for the batter)
  • 1/2 cup butter for cooking the crepes

For the cream cheese filling:

  • 8 ounces cream cheese (1 block), softened
  • 1/2 cup powdered sugar
  • 2 tablespoons whole milk more or less to taste
  • 1/2 teaspoon vanilla
  • 1/8 teaspoon kosher salt

Strawberry filling:

  • 1 and 1/2 pounds strawberries sliced or quartered
  • 1/4 cup granulated sugar
  • 2 tablespoons strawberry jam

Other filling ideas

  • fresh lemon juice with powdered or granulated sugar
  • nutella
  • mixed berries
  • cinnamon sugar
  • whipped cream

Instructions

  • Prep the strawberries: Wash and hull the strawberries, then slice or quarter so they are whatever size you like. Add to a serving bowl. Top with 1/4 cup granulated sugar and 2 tablespoons strawberry jam. Stir together and set aside for about 20 minutes to let the strawberries macerate. (If you want to step it up a notch, make this Fresh Strawberry Topping, which calls for condensing the jam first.)
  • Make the cream cheese filling: This is optional but SO good. Add 8 ounces softened cream cheese to a large bowl or stand mixer. Beat for 1 minute until smooth and creamy, scraping the sides. Add 1/2 cup powdered sugar, 2 tablespoons whole milk, 1/2 teaspoon vanilla, and 1/8 teaspoon salt. Beat well until combined with no lumps, and transfer to a serving bowl.
  • Make the crepe batter: Add 2 cups whole milk and 4 eggs to a blender. (If you don't have a blender, add to a bowl and beat with a hand mixer.) Add 3 tablespoons sugar and 1 tablespoon vanilla. (See notes for savory crepes)
  • Add 1 and 1/2 cups flour and 3/4 teaspoon kosher salt. Spoon the flour into the measuring cups and level off!
  • Blend it together. Melt 1/4 cup butter in a small bowl. With the blender running on low, take the center spout off the blender and add the melted butter while the blender is running. Scrape the edges of the blender bowl and make sure all the flour is incorporated.
  • Set an 8-inch pan on the stove over medium heat. Let it heat for at least 60-90 seconds so it gets nice and hot. Set a stick of butter and the batter near the stove. When the pan is hot, add about 2 teaspoons butter to the hot pan. Swirl it around to coat the entire bottom and up the sides of the pan.
  • Use a 1/4 cup measuring cup to add batter to the pan. You want about 3-4 tablespoons batter for each crepe. (the 1/4 cup measuring cup doesn't need to be entirely full)
  • Add the batter to the center of the pan, dropping it in quickly. Use your other hand to lift the pan and swirl the batter out from the center. Work quickly. The batter sets fast, and you don't want a thick crepe. Continue moving the pan in circles until there is no more liquid batter that will drip around. Try to avoid creating holes in your crepe (this is easier said than done and takes some practice.) If you DO create some holes, quickly fill them in with a tiny bit more batter.
  • Cook the crepe for about 60 seconds. The top of the crepe should look dry and matte, not wet anymore. The bottom of the crepe should just barely be getting golden. Use a spatula, chopsticks, or an offset spatula to carefully lift the edge of the crepe, then insert it underneath as far as you can, and flip the crepe. This takes practice! Don't be discouraged if you need a few tries to get this right. Eat the evidence.
  • When you flip the crepe, it should be very flexible, not flat and hard. This of course makes it more difficult to flip, but a crepe that holds it's shape when lifted 1) either had too much batter poured into it, OR, 2) it was cooked too long. The edges should not be crispy, or if they are, just slightly.
  • Cook on the second side for 10-20 seconds, until the batter is cooked, but not so much that it has time to get crisp. A little browning is okay, but not too much.
  • Remove the crepe to a plate. You can either use a spatula to lift it, or you can lift the pan entirely and flip it over to let the crepe fall onto the plate. Stack the crepes one by one on top of each other on the plate.
  • Decide whether you need to turn the heat up or down. If your crepe has little baby bubbles that pop up right away all over your crepe before you need to flip, your pan is too hot; turn the heat down a little.
  • Continue cooking the crepes until the batter is gone. Sometimes I like to bust out a second frying pan so I can get two crepes cooked at once.
  • Eat hot, and eat them right away! See below for storage options!
  • Strawberry Cream Cheese Crepes: Add a few spoonfuls of cream cheese filling down the center of a crepe. Top with strawberries, and roll up like a burrito. Or, spread a thin layer of cream cheese all over the crepe, add strawberries, and fold into quarters. Top with whipped cream, if you want.
  • Strawberry Nutella Crepes: Add a few spoonfuls of nutella down the center of a crepe. Top with strawberries, and roll up like a burrito. Or, spread a thin layer of nutella all over the crepe, add strawberries, and fold into quarters. Top with whipped cream, if you want.
  • Lemon Sugar Crepes: Sprinkle 1-2 tablespoons granulated sugar all over the top of a crepe. Squeeze a fresh lemon over the top of the sugar. Fold or roll and serve, top with lemon zest if you want extra lemon love.
  • Mixed Berry Cream Cheese Crepes: Add a few spoonfuls of cream cheese filling down the center of a crepe. Top with raspberries, blueberries, and blackberries, and roll up like a burrito. Or, spread a thin layer of cream cheese all over the crepe, add berries, and fold into quarters. Top with whipped cream, if you want.
  • Cinnamon Sugar Crepes: Brush a crepe with melted butter. Sprinkle with cinnamon sugar (about 2-3 teaspoons cinnamon combined with 1/3 cup sugar.) Roll or fold. Top with whipped cream.
  • How to store: I always stack the crepes on a large plate as I am cooking them. If you are not serving them right away, cover the plate well with plastic wrap and keep in the fridge for up to 3 days. I don't bother separating the crepes with wax or parchment paper.
  • How to store batter: You can make this batter ahead of time. Store the batter in a sealed container in the fridge for 2-3 days. Stir well before cooking. If after making the first crepe, you feel the batter is too thick, add milk to the batter 1 tablespoon at a time.

Notes

*You can make these crepes with a lower fat milk, but they will tear and rip a lot more. You need the fat in the milk to help bind the crepes together. 
Savory Crepes:
To make these crepes for a savory dish, like my mama’s Chicken Crepes, reduce the sugar and omit the vanilla. Here are the ingredients:
  • 2 cups + 1 tablespoon whole milk
  • 4 large eggs
  • 1 tablespoon sugar
  • 1 and 1/2 cups flour, spooned and leveled
  • 3/4 teaspoon kosher salt
  • 1/4 cup butter, melted
 

Nutrition

Calories: 235kcal | Carbohydrates: 23g | Protein: 5g | Fat: 14g | Saturated Fat: 8g | Polyunsaturated Fat: 1g | Monounsaturated Fat: 4g | Trans Fat: 0.3g | Cholesterol: 78mg | Sodium: 242mg | Potassium: 150mg | Fiber: 1g | Sugar: 13g | Vitamin A: 517IU | Vitamin C: 22mg | Calcium: 64mg | Iron: 1mg