The TikTok Tortilla Hack the Internet Is Flipping Out About

Every once in a while, the wheel is reinvented. If we’re lucky, smart, or even particularly ingenious, we find new ways to do old things. These novel approaches can flip convention completely on its head, or ever so slightly tweak a well-known formula….

Every once in a while, the wheel is reinvented. If we’re lucky, smart, or even particularly ingenious, we find new ways to do old things. These novel approaches can flip convention completely on its head, or ever so slightly tweak a well-known formula. The latter is precisely the case with a recent internet hack that’s been sweeping the internet.

It all started on TikTok (duh, where else?), when, on December 29th, user crystalscookingfun took a flour tortilla, cut a slit along its radius, placed a single ingredient into each of the circle's quadrants, folded accordingly, and griddled the whole affair to crisp perfection in a panini press. Her folded wrap included a sliced chicken cutlet, spring mix, tomatoes, and grated cheese. Here's the general formula:

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Joanna Gaines Has a New Cooking Show: Here’s What We Know

Joanna Gaines, queen of shiplap, Waco and HGTV, has added a jewel to the crown that is her ever increasing lifestyle empire. Just last weekend, her new cooking television show, Magnolia Table with Joanna Gaines, premiered on the Food Network.

The seri…

Joanna Gaines, queen of shiplap, Waco and HGTV, has added a jewel to the crown that is her ever increasing lifestyle empire. Just last weekend, her new cooking television show, Magnolia Table with Joanna Gaines, premiered on the Food Network.

The series features Gaines anchored behind the counter of her immaculately decorated and sun-drenched kitchen, cooking and explaining her way through a repertoire of favorite recipes. According to her website, spending time in the kitchen has been a boon to Gaines during stressful times. “Nothing about the way I cook is fancy or complicated, but over the years the kitchen has become such an important space for me, so it’s an honor to cook alongside you as we make some of my favorite recipes,” she writes.

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10 Food Trends That Took Over TikTok in 2020

There are so many things to say about the stranglehold TikTok had over the culture this year. As our social, professional and entertainment lives collapsed into the same space, most of us split our time between staring at the screen of our computers an…

There are so many things to say about the stranglehold TikTok had over the culture this year. As our social, professional and entertainment lives collapsed into the same space, most of us split our time between staring at the screen of our computers and the screen of our phones. TikTok was the app that seemed to win the largest portion of our increasingly feeble attention spans. The app touts 50 million active daily users in the U.S..

TikToks, those 15 second snippets of online video content, have virtually taken over, appearing on Instagram, Twitter, and in family group chats (I watch about 20 TikToks a day and I don’t even have the app).

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What Is a Charcuterie House? And Why Are(n’t) You Making One?

Listen, meat and cheese (and sometimes olives and jams and dried fruits) arranged artfully across a surface is a good thing. I like charcuterie boards. They’re endlessly customizable, nice to look at when done right, generally crowd-pleasing and pretty…

Listen, meat and cheese (and sometimes olives and jams and dried fruits) arranged artfully across a surface is a good thing. I like charcuterie boards. They’re endlessly customizable, nice to look at when done right, generally crowd-pleasing and pretty low-maintenance.

In recent years, we’ve watched charcuterie boards soar in popularity. They’re on restaurant menus, at dinner parties, on Instagram (in a big, big way) and, like any trend, they’ve morphed with the times: they’ve gotten bigger and more elaborate. But two recent charcuterations (that’s charcuterie iterations, mind you) are giving me pause.

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The Royal Family’s Christmas Pudding Recipe Is Here

Like almost everyone else I know with access to a Netflix password, I just finished the fourth season of The Crown. And while there’s much to be said about Princess Diana and Margaret Thatcher and the stag tragically shot at Balmoral, I’m here to talk …

Like almost everyone else I know with access to a Netflix password, I just finished the fourth season of The Crown. And while there’s much to be said about Princess Diana and Margaret Thatcher and the stag tragically shot at Balmoral, I’m here to talk about the food.

The show itself doesn’t hone too much on the royal palate—the camera pays closer attention to decorum rather than dinner—yet sometimes we’re let into the wood-paneled dining rooms, where the relatives cavort over Scotch eggs and salmon, asparagus and armagnac. The table is often the site where the difference between the royal family and their less royal counterparts becomes apparent.

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The Most Popular Thanksgiving Dish in Your State

Photo by satelliteinternet.com

There’s one side dish that my family’s Thanksgiving table is never complete without. My grandmother’s mashed rutabagas, or “rooties” as w…

Photo by satelliteinternet.com

There’s one side dish that my family’s Thanksgiving table is never complete without. My grandmother’s mashed rutabagas, or “rooties” as we call them, are like Lindsay Lohan at a nightclub circa 2005: always making an appearance. We might fry the turkey or dry-brine it, we might sub Brussels sprouts for green beans, we might even celebrate on Zoom across three different countries. But the one thing that will remain the same (even in 2020!) is the rutabagas.

What is that dish for your family’s Thanksgiving? Mashed potatoes? Green bean casserole?

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How to Cook Thanksgiving for a Smaller-than-Usual Crew (or Just You)

I’ll spare you the bit about Thanksgiving looking a bit different this year. You know it, I know it. I’ll be celebrating (is that even the word?) from Europe and Zooming in to my family’s table in Texas. And while it may seem tough to sit around and co…

I’ll spare you the bit about Thanksgiving looking a bit different this year. You know it, I know it. I’ll be celebrating (is that even the word?) from Europe and Zooming in to my family’s table in Texas. And while it may seem tough to sit around and cosplay normalcy,, that doesn’t mean Thanksgiving need not exist. It, just like so many other things in 2020, can look, well, different. Didn’t I say I wasn’t going to go there?

Perhaps we’ll be eating with different people than usual, or a different number of people. Perhaps we’ll sit at a table that’s not our own, or the same table we’ve been sitting at for nine months now. Perhaps we’ll eat a turkey with gravy, stuffing and all the steadfast fixings, or maybe we’ll throw convention out the window and eat a bowl of cereal because it’s 2020 and why the hell not.

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Meet the Home Cook Making Every Ina Garten Recipe—Ever

Trent Pheifer was celebrating. He arranged oysters and clams—lustrous, exposed on the half shell—shrimp, crabs, and four blazing-red lobsters over ice. Among the shellfish menagerie he slipped lemon wedges and three dips: mignonette, cocktail, and must…

Trent Pheifer was celebrating. He arranged oysters and clams—lustrous, exposed on the half shell—shrimp, crabs, and four blazing-red lobsters over ice. Among the shellfish menagerie he slipped lemon wedges and three dips: mignonette, cocktail, and mustard sauce. The impressive spread was to commemorate a milestone for Pheifer: Over the course of five years, he has cooked more than 1,000 of Ina Garten’s recipes. And in a little over a year from now, he’ll have cooked his way through her entire culinary oeuvre.

Pheifer began his project, Store Bought Is Fine, five years ago (October 10 is the official anniversary). In the years since its inception, he’s learned a bevy of culinary techniques, sharpened his photography skills, amassed a sizable online following, and even met his culinary idol. What began as a whim has become an all-consuming and life-altering project.

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It’s Not Too Late to Start a Vegetable Garden—Blue Hill Shows Us How

You might have a scallion, shooting out of its bulb, sitting in your windowsill. Or a stalk of romaine, stretching up and away from its leafy base, waiting to be plucked. The coronavirus pandemic and widespread stay at home orders saw our ideas about k…

You might have a scallion, shooting out of its bulb, sitting in your windowsill. Or a stalk of romaine, stretching up and away from its leafy base, waiting to be plucked. The coronavirus pandemic and widespread stay at home orders saw our ideas about kitchens, and our practices of feeding ourselves take new shape, much of it couched in self-sufficiency. As we eke into the fifth month spent relatively homebound, the team at Blue Hill at Stone Barns is developing an even more comprehensive way to grow at home.

When COVID-19 hit, like many restaurants across the country, Blue Hill at Stone Barns was forced to let go of a majority of their employees. Located an hour north of New York City, the restaurant and the farmland upon which it sits were suddenly, uncharacteristically empty. Chef Dan Barber and Jack Algiere, the Stone Barns farm director, considered their now-jobless cooks, starting with a guiding inquiry: “What would it look like if out-of-work cooks around the world dug in and built a garden?” Thus, the The Kitchen Farming Project, was born: An online curriculum for first-time gardeners wanting to plant, harvest, and cook all their own food at home.

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How Community Fridges Are Fighting Food Insecurity

On a sidewalk, in a corner of Bed-Stuy in Brooklyn, there sits a fridge. It hums quietly—indicating it’s working, and not abandoned. The fridge is painted purple and sports a face with arched green eyebrows and a playful curl down its forehead. Beneath…

On a sidewalk, in a corner of Bed-Stuy in Brooklyn, there sits a fridge. It hums quietly—indicating it’s working, and not abandoned. The fridge is painted purple and sports a face with arched green eyebrows and a playful curl down its forehead. Beneath the face, a written message: “Free food for all! Take some, leave some, keep it clean!” Inside, on its shelves, is fresh produce, left there by caring neighbors, supportive passersby, or bought with donations made to Playground Coffee Shop, a community-minded cafe run by Zenat Begum. Everything inside the fridge is free.

In a little over a week, Begum and her team of Playground employees, volunteers, and friends have set up almost 10 such fridges across Brooklyn—the majority in Bed-Stuy, Crown Heights, and Sunset Park. The premise is simple: functioning fridges, usually sourced through Craigslist, filled with fresh fruits and vegetables for the taking. “We’re only encouraging people to give fresh produce because that’s what the war is on,” Begum tells me over the phone. Most of the fridges are also set up near local independent businesses, in the hopes that they’ll also receive some of the attention the fridges attract. “We’re using our own sidewalks to do this because that’s where the people are at.”

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