Celebrating Day of the Dead With a Spread of Beloved Recipes

Mexico’s Dia De Los Muertos (Day of the Dead) celebrates loved ones who have passed. Some families put together an ofrenda, an altar created in their honor, featuring photographs and the deceased’s favorite foods and drinks. Other families picnic at th…

Mexico’s Dia De Los Muertos (Day of the Dead) celebrates loved ones who have passed. Some families put together an ofrenda, an altar created in their honor, featuring photographs and the deceased’s favorite foods and drinks. Other families picnic at the burial sites of their loved ones. “When you travel to the cemetery to feast and celebrate the lives of your ancestors,” Mexican Chef Tello Carreon (formerly of Nixta in St. Louis) says, “It’s an experience you don’t really forget.”

While Mexico is known for its street food, the variety of vendors setting up shop depends on the day of the week and time of the day. You might be craving esquites, a cup brimming with boiled corn off the cob, dressed in a combination of lime, chile, salt, butter, mayo, and cheese; however, if it’s mid-day or earlier, you’ll have to wait until after dinner to get your fix. That’s not the case with tamales. Wrapped in corn husk and filled with meats, cheese, or sweets, tamales can be found on every corner, throughout the day. This inexpensive food is commonly grabbed on the go for breakfast—en route to a Dia De Los Muertos ofrenda, perhaps—with some vendors offering it up in a bolillo (a Mexican baguette, if you will).

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